Mitchell Angus | TSLN.com

Mitchell Angus

Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns

Photo courtesy Mitchell Angus

Eminent author Rudyard Kipling spoke of East being East and West being West and the two never meeting. We might think the same reasoning could apply to Town and Country, but across our region many communities not boasting large populations draw much of their lifeblood from the surrounding countryside. Many whose living is made in the country are deeply involved and quite influential within those same communities.

The Mitchell family of the South Creek region a few miles north of Kadoka, SD, is a good example. Chip Mitchell’s father went to work for George Renning on South Creek a long time ago, and the third generation lives there now.

George was an established rancher breeding registered Angus and Hereford cattle and holding a responsible place in the community, and the Mitchell’s have followed suit. Young Brandon Mitchell says, “George Renning had a big influence on my life.” Today the Mitchell’s own the Renning homesteads and still raise Angus cattle… some red and some black.

It’s always wise to diversify, and Mitchell’s epitomize the practice. Brandon’s parents Chip and Mitzi Mitchell breed the Black Angus; Brandon and his wife Belinda run Red Angus; and Brandon’s brother Tyrel raises Simmental cattle.

Eminent author Rudyard Kipling spoke of East being East and West being West and the two never meeting. We might think the same reasoning could apply to Town and Country, but across our region many communities not boasting large populations draw much of their lifeblood from the surrounding countryside. Many whose living is made in the country are deeply involved and quite influential within those same communities.

The Mitchell family of the South Creek region a few miles north of Kadoka, SD, is a good example. Chip Mitchell’s father went to work for George Renning on South Creek a long time ago, and the third generation lives there now.

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George was an established rancher breeding registered Angus and Hereford cattle and holding a responsible place in the community, and the Mitchell’s have followed suit. Young Brandon Mitchell says, “George Renning had a big influence on my life.” Today the Mitchell’s own the Renning homesteads and still raise Angus cattle… some red and some black.

It’s always wise to diversify, and Mitchell’s epitomize the practice. Brandon’s parents Chip and Mitzi Mitchell breed the Black Angus; Brandon and his wife Belinda run Red Angus; and Brandon’s brother Tyrel raises Simmental cattle.

Eminent author Rudyard Kipling spoke of East being East and West being West and the two never meeting. We might think the same reasoning could apply to Town and Country, but across our region many communities not boasting large populations draw much of their lifeblood from the surrounding countryside. Many whose living is made in the country are deeply involved and quite influential within those same communities.

The Mitchell family of the South Creek region a few miles north of Kadoka, SD, is a good example. Chip Mitchell’s father went to work for George Renning on South Creek a long time ago, and the third generation lives there now.

George was an established rancher breeding registered Angus and Hereford cattle and holding a responsible place in the community, and the Mitchell’s have followed suit. Young Brandon Mitchell says, “George Renning had a big influence on my life.” Today the Mitchell’s own the Renning homesteads and still raise Angus cattle… some red and some black.

It’s always wise to diversify, and Mitchell’s epitomize the practice. Brandon’s parents Chip and Mitzi Mitchell breed the Black Angus; Brandon and his wife Belinda run Red Angus; and Brandon’s brother Tyrel raises Simmental cattle.

Eminent author Rudyard Kipling spoke of East being East and West being West and the two never meeting. We might think the same reasoning could apply to Town and Country, but across our region many communities not boasting large populations draw much of their lifeblood from the surrounding countryside. Many whose living is made in the country are deeply involved and quite influential within those same communities.

The Mitchell family of the South Creek region a few miles north of Kadoka, SD, is a good example. Chip Mitchell’s father went to work for George Renning on South Creek a long time ago, and the third generation lives there now.

George was an established rancher breeding registered Angus and Hereford cattle and holding a responsible place in the community, and the Mitchell’s have followed suit. Young Brandon Mitchell says, “George Renning had a big influence on my life.” Today the Mitchell’s own the Renning homesteads and still raise Angus cattle… some red and some black.

It’s always wise to diversify, and Mitchell’s epitomize the practice. Brandon’s parents Chip and Mitzi Mitchell breed the Black Angus; Brandon and his wife Belinda run Red Angus; and Brandon’s brother Tyrel raises Simmental cattle.

Eminent author Rudyard Kipling spoke of East being East and West being West and the two never meeting. We might think the same reasoning could apply to Town and Country, but across our region many communities not boasting large populations draw much of their lifeblood from the surrounding countryside. Many whose living is made in the country are deeply involved and quite influential within those same communities.

The Mitchell family of the South Creek region a few miles north of Kadoka, SD, is a good example. Chip Mitchell’s father went to work for George Renning on South Creek a long time ago, and the third generation lives there now.

George was an established rancher breeding registered Angus and Hereford cattle and holding a responsible place in the community, and the Mitchell’s have followed suit. Young Brandon Mitchell says, “George Renning had a big influence on my life.” Today the Mitchell’s own the Renning homesteads and still raise Angus cattle… some red and some black.

It’s always wise to diversify, and Mitchell’s epitomize the practice. Brandon’s parents Chip and Mitzi Mitchell breed the Black Angus; Brandon and his wife Belinda run Red Angus; and Brandon’s brother Tyrel raises Simmental cattle.

Eminent author Rudyard Kipling spoke of East being East and West being West and the two never meeting. We might think the same reasoning could apply to Town and Country, but across our region many communities not boasting large populations draw much of their lifeblood from the surrounding countryside. Many whose living is made in the country are deeply involved and quite influential within those same communities.

The Mitchell family of the South Creek region a few miles north of Kadoka, SD, is a good example. Chip Mitchell’s father went to work for George Renning on South Creek a long time ago, and the third generation lives there now.

George was an established rancher breeding registered Angus and Hereford cattle and holding a responsible place in the community, and the Mitchell’s have followed suit. Young Brandon Mitchell says, “George Renning had a big influence on my life.” Today the Mitchell’s own the Renning homesteads and still raise Angus cattle… some red and some black.

It’s always wise to diversify, and Mitchell’s epitomize the practice. Brandon’s parents Chip and Mitzi Mitchell breed the Black Angus; Brandon and his wife Belinda run Red Angus; and Brandon’s brother Tyrel raises Simmental cattle.

this article appeared in the 2009 winter cattle journal, a publication of tri-state livestock news.

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