More Americans familiar with factory farming term, study finds | TSLN.com

More Americans familiar with factory farming term, study finds

A July, 2010 consumer study, funded by the beef checkoff, found that the percentage of consumers familiar with the term “factory farming” increased to 64 percent, compared to 49 percent just two years ago – although the number of consumers who associate cattle with factory farming has remained fairly stable since 2008. These findings are troubling, the Beef Board said, because that term is one of the weapons used to attack the beef industry, used to paint a picture of animal suffering, food safety concerns, environmental damage, and excessive antibiotic and hormone use.

The study also found that more than half of consumers believe the beef they buy at the supermarket is from animals raised in factory farms – and more than half of these consumers worry about the safety of the beef they buy. “It’s frightening how disconnected consumers have become from the everyday workings of our farms and ranches,” said Daryl Owen, chairman of the checkoff’s Public Opinion and Issues Management Group. “This report may help us learn how to present our story in a way that improves consumers’ perceptions of modern beef production. Consumers need to know about the conscientious animal care and the focus on safety, to which our industry is dedicated.”

The checkoff has prepared a 34-page book “with helpful tips on how to tell” the industry’s story. It’s titled “Beef: The Real Story is Your Story.” A free copy can be requested by e-mailing Melissa Slagle at the Beef Board, mslagle@beefboard.org.

A July, 2010 consumer study, funded by the beef checkoff, found that the percentage of consumers familiar with the term “factory farming” increased to 64 percent, compared to 49 percent just two years ago – although the number of consumers who associate cattle with factory farming has remained fairly stable since 2008. These findings are troubling, the Beef Board said, because that term is one of the weapons used to attack the beef industry, used to paint a picture of animal suffering, food safety concerns, environmental damage, and excessive antibiotic and hormone use.

The study also found that more than half of consumers believe the beef they buy at the supermarket is from animals raised in factory farms – and more than half of these consumers worry about the safety of the beef they buy. “It’s frightening how disconnected consumers have become from the everyday workings of our farms and ranches,” said Daryl Owen, chairman of the checkoff’s Public Opinion and Issues Management Group. “This report may help us learn how to present our story in a way that improves consumers’ perceptions of modern beef production. Consumers need to know about the conscientious animal care and the focus on safety, to which our industry is dedicated.”

The checkoff has prepared a 34-page book “with helpful tips on how to tell” the industry’s story. It’s titled “Beef: The Real Story is Your Story.” A free copy can be requested by e-mailing Melissa Slagle at the Beef Board, mslagle@beefboard.org.

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