National Research Council says Kansas biodefense lab poses FMD risk | TSLN.com

National Research Council says Kansas biodefense lab poses FMD risk

There’s at least a 70 percent chance the planned biodefense lab in Manhattan, KS, will accidentally release foot and mouth disease (FMD) within a 50-year time span, according to a report released Monday Nov. 15 by the National Research Council (NRC) . Defenders of the proposed federal National Bio and Agri-Defense Facility (NBAF) said the Council review, requested by Congress, failed to consider the many security precautions being developed to greatly reduce the risk of pathogen release when the lab opens in 2018.

The lab is still in the planning stages. Supporters, while quick to defend the lab’s safety precautions, agreed the Council’s findings could help make the lab even safer. Tom Thornton, president of the Kansas Bioscience Authority, said the lab, on the Kansas State University campus, will feature “every safeguard, every safety protocol, every mitigation strategy available.”

The six members of the state’s Congressional delegation put out a joint statement, saying, “We are confident this facility will be the safest research laboratory in the world, and its mission is critical in order to protect our nation’s food supply.”

University of Louisville Professor Ronald Lake led the Research Council study. He said, “It is up to policy makers to decide whether the risks are acceptable. The Department of Homeland Security will need to determine what steps to take.”

There’s at least a 70 percent chance the planned biodefense lab in Manhattan, KS, will accidentally release foot and mouth disease (FMD) within a 50-year time span, according to a report released Monday Nov. 15 by the National Research Council (NRC) . Defenders of the proposed federal National Bio and Agri-Defense Facility (NBAF) said the Council review, requested by Congress, failed to consider the many security precautions being developed to greatly reduce the risk of pathogen release when the lab opens in 2018.

The lab is still in the planning stages. Supporters, while quick to defend the lab’s safety precautions, agreed the Council’s findings could help make the lab even safer. Tom Thornton, president of the Kansas Bioscience Authority, said the lab, on the Kansas State University campus, will feature “every safeguard, every safety protocol, every mitigation strategy available.”

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The six members of the state’s Congressional delegation put out a joint statement, saying, “We are confident this facility will be the safest research laboratory in the world, and its mission is critical in order to protect our nation’s food supply.”

University of Louisville Professor Ronald Lake led the Research Council study. He said, “It is up to policy makers to decide whether the risks are acceptable. The Department of Homeland Security will need to determine what steps to take.”

There’s at least a 70 percent chance the planned biodefense lab in Manhattan, KS, will accidentally release foot and mouth disease (FMD) within a 50-year time span, according to a report released Monday Nov. 15 by the National Research Council (NRC) . Defenders of the proposed federal National Bio and Agri-Defense Facility (NBAF) said the Council review, requested by Congress, failed to consider the many security precautions being developed to greatly reduce the risk of pathogen release when the lab opens in 2018.

The lab is still in the planning stages. Supporters, while quick to defend the lab’s safety precautions, agreed the Council’s findings could help make the lab even safer. Tom Thornton, president of the Kansas Bioscience Authority, said the lab, on the Kansas State University campus, will feature “every safeguard, every safety protocol, every mitigation strategy available.”

The six members of the state’s Congressional delegation put out a joint statement, saying, “We are confident this facility will be the safest research laboratory in the world, and its mission is critical in order to protect our nation’s food supply.”

University of Louisville Professor Ronald Lake led the Research Council study. He said, “It is up to policy makers to decide whether the risks are acceptable. The Department of Homeland Security will need to determine what steps to take.”

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