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Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture Aggies applaud FFA equine sciences

CURTIS, NEB. – Quentin Anderson is headed to college thanks, in part, to his skill with horses.

The Pierce High School senior and FFA chapter treasurer will graduate in May then head to the Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture in Curtis.

There, he will major in animal science and agribusiness and compete with Aggie Rodeo in calf roping.

Anderson was among Nebraska FFA members who recently earned Equine Science Proficiency Awards at the Nebraska FFA Convention.

The 2017 recipients and FFA chapters were:

Equine Science, Placement – 1. Quentin Anderson, Pierce; 2. Michael Anderson, Norris; and 3. Chantelle Schulz, McCool Junction.

Equine Science, Entrepreneurship – 1. Jared Fulton, Valentine; 2. Tallli Pokorny, Wheeler Central; and 3. Allison Stracke, Stuart.

Career-long accomplishments in equine science entrepreneurship or equine science placement were recognized statewide.

"I was honored to visit with these high school students about their FFA Supervised Agricultural Experience programs in equine science," said Ron Rosati, NCTA dean.

"The equine management program is an increasingly popular and highly successful aspect of the animal science academics at NCTA," Rosati said. "We look forward to welcoming Quentin Anderson and Chantelle Schulz to NCTA in the fall."

Dean Rosati presented plaques sponsored by NCTA to the equine placement students. First National Bank sponsored the equine entrepreneurship awards.

Proficiency awards recognize the technical knowledge and skills that students develop throughout their SAE experience in high school. Equine Science is one of 50 categories at chapter, district and state levels.

Quentin Anderson's experience around horses started when he was young, as his family bought colts for training and the enterprise grew.

"We started with a few horses and I began growing them and turned them into rope horses," said Anderson. He won the award for his management, training and achievement with the enterprise.

"I learned a lot in 4-H and FFA, and through some good friends who are ropers. They took me under their wing and helped me learn the trade."

Anderson registers for classes at NCTA on April 17. "I liked the idea of the small school, being allowed to rodeo and it has equine and agribusiness."

NCTA freshman classmate Chantelle Schulz of McCool Junction plans to major in agricultural education.

Additional information about the NCTA animal science and agricultural education programs can be gained from Professor Doug Smith, division chairman, at dsmith@unl.edu or call 1-800-3CURTIS. F

–Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture