Nebraska Cattlemen consider dropping brand inspections | TSLN.com

Nebraska Cattlemen consider dropping brand inspections

The Nebraska Cattlemen are considering asking for legislation ending brand inspection, a state law since 1941. Cattlemen staff member Melody Benjamin said they don’t want to end branding, just the inspections. They plan to hold informational and educational meetings across the state before deciding whether to approach a state senator about sponsoring a bill ending the inspections.

The Associated Press this week reported that many ranchers no longer want to pay the 75 cent/head fee for inspection whenever cattle are sold, or when they cross the north-south inspection line in central Nebraska that divides farming and ranching country.

Benjamin, on ending the inspections said, “Why is it that there are only 13 states…that find it necessary to have inspection of some sort? Why are we special? Why is this necessary here?”

Count State Sen. LeRoy Loudon, a rancher, as being against changing the law. “We’re having problems now with cattle being stolen and hauled off,” he said.

The AP also reported that Brand Committee investigators have obtained 14 felony convictions in the past five years related to livestock theft and fraud. Steve Stanec, the committee’s executive director, said each of the convictions “relied heavily on brand inspection documents…issued when brand inspections were performed. Without that paper trail, those convictions would be hard to obtain.”

The Nebraska Cattlemen are considering asking for legislation ending brand inspection, a state law since 1941. Cattlemen staff member Melody Benjamin said they don’t want to end branding, just the inspections. They plan to hold informational and educational meetings across the state before deciding whether to approach a state senator about sponsoring a bill ending the inspections.

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The Associated Press this week reported that many ranchers no longer want to pay the 75 cent/head fee for inspection whenever cattle are sold, or when they cross the north-south inspection line in central Nebraska that divides farming and ranching country.

Benjamin, on ending the inspections said, “Why is it that there are only 13 states…that find it necessary to have inspection of some sort? Why are we special? Why is this necessary here?”

Count State Sen. LeRoy Loudon, a rancher, as being against changing the law. “We’re having problems now with cattle being stolen and hauled off,” he said.

The AP also reported that Brand Committee investigators have obtained 14 felony convictions in the past five years related to livestock theft and fraud. Steve Stanec, the committee’s executive director, said each of the convictions “relied heavily on brand inspection documents…issued when brand inspections were performed. Without that paper trail, those convictions would be hard to obtain.”

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