Nebraska: Horse slaughter bill sends message to HSUS | TSLN.com

Nebraska: Horse slaughter bill sends message to HSUS

The Nebraska Legislature Wednesday, March 30, advanced a bill that could lead to the slaughter of horses in the state – and in doing so, sent a message to the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and similar groups, said State Sen. Tom Carlson, chairman of the Agriculture Committee.

“It tells them that they aren’t welcome here, that they won’t be successful here and that they will be defeated,” he said. The measure, LB 305, cleared the first of three needed rounds of approval on a 35-1 vote.

The bill was scaled back from its original form, as introduced by Sen. Tyson Larson. That bill would have created a state meat inspection program, which could have led to horse slaughter. However, on Wednesday Larson introduced an amendment, to simply require a study of what would be needed to start a state program.

His amendment followed comments by USDA officials that the Congressional ban on federal inspection of horse slaughter and processing plants also applies to state programs. Carlson blamed the ban on HSUS, which he called a “dangerous outside group” that wants to destroy agriculture.

The Nebraska Legislature Wednesday, March 30, advanced a bill that could lead to the slaughter of horses in the state – and in doing so, sent a message to the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and similar groups, said State Sen. Tom Carlson, chairman of the Agriculture Committee.

“It tells them that they aren’t welcome here, that they won’t be successful here and that they will be defeated,” he said. The measure, LB 305, cleared the first of three needed rounds of approval on a 35-1 vote.

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The bill was scaled back from its original form, as introduced by Sen. Tyson Larson. That bill would have created a state meat inspection program, which could have led to horse slaughter. However, on Wednesday Larson introduced an amendment, to simply require a study of what would be needed to start a state program.

His amendment followed comments by USDA officials that the Congressional ban on federal inspection of horse slaughter and processing plants also applies to state programs. Carlson blamed the ban on HSUS, which he called a “dangerous outside group” that wants to destroy agriculture.

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