Nebraska: Leopold Conservation Award given to Mathewson family | TSLN.com

Nebraska: Leopold Conservation Award given to Mathewson family

Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman was joined by the Nebraska Cattlemen in announcing the recipient of the 2011 Nebraska Leopold Conservation Award. The award is presented annually to private landowners who practice responsible land stewardship and management.

The 2011 award will be presented later this year to three generations of the Mathewson family who operate near Potter in western Nebraska. Rodney Mathewson started a small farming and cattle operation in the 1940s. His commitment to protect the health of natural resources was instilled in son, Randy, and grandson, Beau, who run the ranch today with their wives, Gina and Kahla, respectively.

“As we prepare to celebrate Earth Day, we want to acknowledge the conservation efforts of Nebraska landowners,” Gov. Heineman said. “Ninety-three percent of all acres are utilized by farmers and ranchers. It is being well cared for by Nebraskans who take on the responsibility of leaving things better for future generations. Conservation on private land is something Nebraskans do very well. We all benefit from the work of private landowners who are preserving the natural beauty of our state.”

The Leopold Conservation Award honors world-renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold. Eight states, including Nebraska, honor landowners for their work to conserve and preserve private land. In Nebraska, the award is presented by the Nebraska Cattlemen, the Sand County Foundation and Cargill, with sponsorship from agriculture and conservation organizations and businesses.

Nebraska Cattlemen President-elect Jim Ramm said, “Nebraska Cattlemen is proud to support this award because Nebraska farmers and ranchers are excellent stewards of the environment. Cattle farmers and ranchers like the Mathewsons work hard to sustain and improve their land as they produce wholesome and nutritious food for your family and mine.”

In the early 1990s, the Mathewsons’ ranch expanded with the purchase of adjacent land, which was in disrepair. It has been restored using effective soil and water management efforts and the time intensive work of removing abandoned equipment, farmsteads and fencing.

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Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman was joined by the Nebraska Cattlemen in announcing the recipient of the 2011 Nebraska Leopold Conservation Award. The award is presented annually to private landowners who practice responsible land stewardship and management.

The 2011 award will be presented later this year to three generations of the Mathewson family who operate near Potter in western Nebraska. Rodney Mathewson started a small farming and cattle operation in the 1940s. His commitment to protect the health of natural resources was instilled in son, Randy, and grandson, Beau, who run the ranch today with their wives, Gina and Kahla, respectively.

“As we prepare to celebrate Earth Day, we want to acknowledge the conservation efforts of Nebraska landowners,” Gov. Heineman said. “Ninety-three percent of all acres are utilized by farmers and ranchers. It is being well cared for by Nebraskans who take on the responsibility of leaving things better for future generations. Conservation on private land is something Nebraskans do very well. We all benefit from the work of private landowners who are preserving the natural beauty of our state.”

The Leopold Conservation Award honors world-renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold. Eight states, including Nebraska, honor landowners for their work to conserve and preserve private land. In Nebraska, the award is presented by the Nebraska Cattlemen, the Sand County Foundation and Cargill, with sponsorship from agriculture and conservation organizations and businesses.

Nebraska Cattlemen President-elect Jim Ramm said, “Nebraska Cattlemen is proud to support this award because Nebraska farmers and ranchers are excellent stewards of the environment. Cattle farmers and ranchers like the Mathewsons work hard to sustain and improve their land as they produce wholesome and nutritious food for your family and mine.”

In the early 1990s, the Mathewsons’ ranch expanded with the purchase of adjacent land, which was in disrepair. It has been restored using effective soil and water management efforts and the time intensive work of removing abandoned equipment, farmsteads and fencing.

Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman was joined by the Nebraska Cattlemen in announcing the recipient of the 2011 Nebraska Leopold Conservation Award. The award is presented annually to private landowners who practice responsible land stewardship and management.

The 2011 award will be presented later this year to three generations of the Mathewson family who operate near Potter in western Nebraska. Rodney Mathewson started a small farming and cattle operation in the 1940s. His commitment to protect the health of natural resources was instilled in son, Randy, and grandson, Beau, who run the ranch today with their wives, Gina and Kahla, respectively.

“As we prepare to celebrate Earth Day, we want to acknowledge the conservation efforts of Nebraska landowners,” Gov. Heineman said. “Ninety-three percent of all acres are utilized by farmers and ranchers. It is being well cared for by Nebraskans who take on the responsibility of leaving things better for future generations. Conservation on private land is something Nebraskans do very well. We all benefit from the work of private landowners who are preserving the natural beauty of our state.”

The Leopold Conservation Award honors world-renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold. Eight states, including Nebraska, honor landowners for their work to conserve and preserve private land. In Nebraska, the award is presented by the Nebraska Cattlemen, the Sand County Foundation and Cargill, with sponsorship from agriculture and conservation organizations and businesses.

Nebraska Cattlemen President-elect Jim Ramm said, “Nebraska Cattlemen is proud to support this award because Nebraska farmers and ranchers are excellent stewards of the environment. Cattle farmers and ranchers like the Mathewsons work hard to sustain and improve their land as they produce wholesome and nutritious food for your family and mine.”

In the early 1990s, the Mathewsons’ ranch expanded with the purchase of adjacent land, which was in disrepair. It has been restored using effective soil and water management efforts and the time intensive work of removing abandoned equipment, farmsteads and fencing.

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