Newell FFA students learn about desert agriculture | TSLN.com

Newell FFA students learn about desert agriculture

There’s nothing quite like a South Dakota winter to chill the bones and make one dream of sunny days and lemonade. That being said, 10 seniors from the Newell FFA chapter recently found themselves walking into their summer fantasy of desert paradise on a recent five-day excursion to Tucson, AZ.

On the first day of their journey, Monday, Jan. 10, students flew to Phoenix-Mesa Regional Airport. The more seasoned travelers in the group were entertained by those “newbie” air passengers. After landing and acquiring rental cars, the group drove two hours to their hotel in Marana, AZ.

After a night of sleep, the group was ready to visit the Sonoran Desert Museum within Saguaro National Park. The museum helped students become familiar with desert flora and fauna. Following the museum, students set out on a long drive to the Old West town of Tombstone, AZ, home of the OK Corral. There students wandered the dusty streets and took in a comedic shootout reenactment before reporting to the “Good Enough” silver mine for an underground tour.

During its peak production, the Good Enough Mine was the largest mine in the U.S. The group followed its twists and turns all the while learning about its numerous minerals. The tour guide pointed out a very unique geological structure not seen by many people – an ancient hydrothermal vent containing many mineral crystals. Another interesting aspect of working underground was the lack of depth perception, which the tour guide demonstrated by throwing a rock at the wall – taking much longer to hit the wall than expected. Departing Tombstone, the group experienced passing through a Border Patrol checkpoint, in which everyone was allowed to pass without incident.

On the third day of the trip, the group toured the Green Valley Pecan Company, one of the largest pecan producers in the U.S. The tour consisted of both the nut processing facility and the pecan orchards, of which Green Valley has nearly 5,000 acres. It was interesting to note that all the orchards were flood plain irrigated.

Next up was the ASARCO Mission Copper Mine Complex, where students learned about the extensive refining process for copper ore.

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The third day concluded with a stop at the Pima Air and Space Museum, which has one of the nation’s largest warplane collections. One of the aircraft contained in the museum is the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest plane ever built. While leaving the museum, the group unexpectedly witnessed the arrival of Air Force One, carrying President Obama on his way to deliver a memorial speech for those killed in the Tucson, AZ shooting.

Thursday morning found the group on one of the “Sky Islands” of the desert at Picacho Peak State Park. This climb was a four-mile hike, and in many places the use of an anchored cable was needed to pull students up the steep section. Picacho is the heart of the state park which, in part, commemorates the site of the western most battle of the Civil War.

Just outside the Picacho Peak State Park was Rooster Cogburn’s Ostrich Farm, one of the world’s largest ostrich production facilities. Students toured the ranch by monster truck to observe the ostriches before getting the opportunity to hand feed the animals, as well as Boer goats and Lorikeets.

The last day of the tour brought the group to the world famous Biosphere 2, originally built to study the proposal of hermetically sealed living areas on other planets. Today, the Biosphere is used by the University of Arizona to conduct climate research.

Before heading home, the group visited the Phoenix Zoo, which houses many exotic creatures and interactive activities, which included feeding sting rays.

The time came that the group had to say “adios” to Arizona and get on a homeward bound plane. Although the activities planned on the trip were fantastic, the students’ general consensus was that the best part of the experience was simply getting to travel together one last time as a group. It was somewhat bittersweet, knowing that everyone will graduate in the spring.

The Newell FFA Senior Class would like to extend their thanks to all of the individuals and businesses that made this trip possible. Sponsors for the trip included: First National Bank of Newell; Bomgaars of Spearfish; Leber Ag Service; K&J Ag Industries; Tri-State Realty; Belle Fourche Vet Clinic; Sack Chiropractic; H.L. Brunner Feedlot; Kitzan Sheep Co.; State Representative Tom Brunner; Paul Hinkhouse; Frank and Sharon Myers; and Kermit and Liz Diers. Students also recognized their chaperones: Danelle Mutchler; Tom Seaman; and especially Kermit Diers, who volunteered a massive amount of his own time planning, organizing and sponsoring the trip.

There’s nothing quite like a South Dakota winter to chill the bones and make one dream of sunny days and lemonade. That being said, 10 seniors from the Newell FFA chapter recently found themselves walking into their summer fantasy of desert paradise on a recent five-day excursion to Tucson, AZ.

On the first day of their journey, Monday, Jan. 10, students flew to Phoenix-Mesa Regional Airport. The more seasoned travelers in the group were entertained by those “newbie” air passengers. After landing and acquiring rental cars, the group drove two hours to their hotel in Marana, AZ.

After a night of sleep, the group was ready to visit the Sonoran Desert Museum within Saguaro National Park. The museum helped students become familiar with desert flora and fauna. Following the museum, students set out on a long drive to the Old West town of Tombstone, AZ, home of the OK Corral. There students wandered the dusty streets and took in a comedic shootout reenactment before reporting to the “Good Enough” silver mine for an underground tour.

During its peak production, the Good Enough Mine was the largest mine in the U.S. The group followed its twists and turns all the while learning about its numerous minerals. The tour guide pointed out a very unique geological structure not seen by many people – an ancient hydrothermal vent containing many mineral crystals. Another interesting aspect of working underground was the lack of depth perception, which the tour guide demonstrated by throwing a rock at the wall – taking much longer to hit the wall than expected. Departing Tombstone, the group experienced passing through a Border Patrol checkpoint, in which everyone was allowed to pass without incident.

On the third day of the trip, the group toured the Green Valley Pecan Company, one of the largest pecan producers in the U.S. The tour consisted of both the nut processing facility and the pecan orchards, of which Green Valley has nearly 5,000 acres. It was interesting to note that all the orchards were flood plain irrigated.

Next up was the ASARCO Mission Copper Mine Complex, where students learned about the extensive refining process for copper ore.

The third day concluded with a stop at the Pima Air and Space Museum, which has one of the nation’s largest warplane collections. One of the aircraft contained in the museum is the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest plane ever built. While leaving the museum, the group unexpectedly witnessed the arrival of Air Force One, carrying President Obama on his way to deliver a memorial speech for those killed in the Tucson, AZ shooting.

Thursday morning found the group on one of the “Sky Islands” of the desert at Picacho Peak State Park. This climb was a four-mile hike, and in many places the use of an anchored cable was needed to pull students up the steep section. Picacho is the heart of the state park which, in part, commemorates the site of the western most battle of the Civil War.

Just outside the Picacho Peak State Park was Rooster Cogburn’s Ostrich Farm, one of the world’s largest ostrich production facilities. Students toured the ranch by monster truck to observe the ostriches before getting the opportunity to hand feed the animals, as well as Boer goats and Lorikeets.

The last day of the tour brought the group to the world famous Biosphere 2, originally built to study the proposal of hermetically sealed living areas on other planets. Today, the Biosphere is used by the University of Arizona to conduct climate research.

Before heading home, the group visited the Phoenix Zoo, which houses many exotic creatures and interactive activities, which included feeding sting rays.

The time came that the group had to say “adios” to Arizona and get on a homeward bound plane. Although the activities planned on the trip were fantastic, the students’ general consensus was that the best part of the experience was simply getting to travel together one last time as a group. It was somewhat bittersweet, knowing that everyone will graduate in the spring.

The Newell FFA Senior Class would like to extend their thanks to all of the individuals and businesses that made this trip possible. Sponsors for the trip included: First National Bank of Newell; Bomgaars of Spearfish; Leber Ag Service; K&J Ag Industries; Tri-State Realty; Belle Fourche Vet Clinic; Sack Chiropractic; H.L. Brunner Feedlot; Kitzan Sheep Co.; State Representative Tom Brunner; Paul Hinkhouse; Frank and Sharon Myers; and Kermit and Liz Diers. Students also recognized their chaperones: Danelle Mutchler; Tom Seaman; and especially Kermit Diers, who volunteered a massive amount of his own time planning, organizing and sponsoring the trip.

There’s nothing quite like a South Dakota winter to chill the bones and make one dream of sunny days and lemonade. That being said, 10 seniors from the Newell FFA chapter recently found themselves walking into their summer fantasy of desert paradise on a recent five-day excursion to Tucson, AZ.

On the first day of their journey, Monday, Jan. 10, students flew to Phoenix-Mesa Regional Airport. The more seasoned travelers in the group were entertained by those “newbie” air passengers. After landing and acquiring rental cars, the group drove two hours to their hotel in Marana, AZ.

After a night of sleep, the group was ready to visit the Sonoran Desert Museum within Saguaro National Park. The museum helped students become familiar with desert flora and fauna. Following the museum, students set out on a long drive to the Old West town of Tombstone, AZ, home of the OK Corral. There students wandered the dusty streets and took in a comedic shootout reenactment before reporting to the “Good Enough” silver mine for an underground tour.

During its peak production, the Good Enough Mine was the largest mine in the U.S. The group followed its twists and turns all the while learning about its numerous minerals. The tour guide pointed out a very unique geological structure not seen by many people – an ancient hydrothermal vent containing many mineral crystals. Another interesting aspect of working underground was the lack of depth perception, which the tour guide demonstrated by throwing a rock at the wall – taking much longer to hit the wall than expected. Departing Tombstone, the group experienced passing through a Border Patrol checkpoint, in which everyone was allowed to pass without incident.

On the third day of the trip, the group toured the Green Valley Pecan Company, one of the largest pecan producers in the U.S. The tour consisted of both the nut processing facility and the pecan orchards, of which Green Valley has nearly 5,000 acres. It was interesting to note that all the orchards were flood plain irrigated.

Next up was the ASARCO Mission Copper Mine Complex, where students learned about the extensive refining process for copper ore.

The third day concluded with a stop at the Pima Air and Space Museum, which has one of the nation’s largest warplane collections. One of the aircraft contained in the museum is the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest plane ever built. While leaving the museum, the group unexpectedly witnessed the arrival of Air Force One, carrying President Obama on his way to deliver a memorial speech for those killed in the Tucson, AZ shooting.

Thursday morning found the group on one of the “Sky Islands” of the desert at Picacho Peak State Park. This climb was a four-mile hike, and in many places the use of an anchored cable was needed to pull students up the steep section. Picacho is the heart of the state park which, in part, commemorates the site of the western most battle of the Civil War.

Just outside the Picacho Peak State Park was Rooster Cogburn’s Ostrich Farm, one of the world’s largest ostrich production facilities. Students toured the ranch by monster truck to observe the ostriches before getting the opportunity to hand feed the animals, as well as Boer goats and Lorikeets.

The last day of the tour brought the group to the world famous Biosphere 2, originally built to study the proposal of hermetically sealed living areas on other planets. Today, the Biosphere is used by the University of Arizona to conduct climate research.

Before heading home, the group visited the Phoenix Zoo, which houses many exotic creatures and interactive activities, which included feeding sting rays.

The time came that the group had to say “adios” to Arizona and get on a homeward bound plane. Although the activities planned on the trip were fantastic, the students’ general consensus was that the best part of the experience was simply getting to travel together one last time as a group. It was somewhat bittersweet, knowing that everyone will graduate in the spring.

The Newell FFA Senior Class would like to extend their thanks to all of the individuals and businesses that made this trip possible. Sponsors for the trip included: First National Bank of Newell; Bomgaars of Spearfish; Leber Ag Service; K&J Ag Industries; Tri-State Realty; Belle Fourche Vet Clinic; Sack Chiropractic; H.L. Brunner Feedlot; Kitzan Sheep Co.; State Representative Tom Brunner; Paul Hinkhouse; Frank and Sharon Myers; and Kermit and Liz Diers. Students also recognized their chaperones: Danelle Mutchler; Tom Seaman; and especially Kermit Diers, who volunteered a massive amount of his own time planning, organizing and sponsoring the trip.

There’s nothing quite like a South Dakota winter to chill the bones and make one dream of sunny days and lemonade. That being said, 10 seniors from the Newell FFA chapter recently found themselves walking into their summer fantasy of desert paradise on a recent five-day excursion to Tucson, AZ.

On the first day of their journey, Monday, Jan. 10, students flew to Phoenix-Mesa Regional Airport. The more seasoned travelers in the group were entertained by those “newbie” air passengers. After landing and acquiring rental cars, the group drove two hours to their hotel in Marana, AZ.

After a night of sleep, the group was ready to visit the Sonoran Desert Museum within Saguaro National Park. The museum helped students become familiar with desert flora and fauna. Following the museum, students set out on a long drive to the Old West town of Tombstone, AZ, home of the OK Corral. There students wandered the dusty streets and took in a comedic shootout reenactment before reporting to the “Good Enough” silver mine for an underground tour.

During its peak production, the Good Enough Mine was the largest mine in the U.S. The group followed its twists and turns all the while learning about its numerous minerals. The tour guide pointed out a very unique geological structure not seen by many people – an ancient hydrothermal vent containing many mineral crystals. Another interesting aspect of working underground was the lack of depth perception, which the tour guide demonstrated by throwing a rock at the wall – taking much longer to hit the wall than expected. Departing Tombstone, the group experienced passing through a Border Patrol checkpoint, in which everyone was allowed to pass without incident.

On the third day of the trip, the group toured the Green Valley Pecan Company, one of the largest pecan producers in the U.S. The tour consisted of both the nut processing facility and the pecan orchards, of which Green Valley has nearly 5,000 acres. It was interesting to note that all the orchards were flood plain irrigated.

Next up was the ASARCO Mission Copper Mine Complex, where students learned about the extensive refining process for copper ore.

The third day concluded with a stop at the Pima Air and Space Museum, which has one of the nation’s largest warplane collections. One of the aircraft contained in the museum is the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest plane ever built. While leaving the museum, the group unexpectedly witnessed the arrival of Air Force One, carrying President Obama on his way to deliver a memorial speech for those killed in the Tucson, AZ shooting.

Thursday morning found the group on one of the “Sky Islands” of the desert at Picacho Peak State Park. This climb was a four-mile hike, and in many places the use of an anchored cable was needed to pull students up the steep section. Picacho is the heart of the state park which, in part, commemorates the site of the western most battle of the Civil War.

Just outside the Picacho Peak State Park was Rooster Cogburn’s Ostrich Farm, one of the world’s largest ostrich production facilities. Students toured the ranch by monster truck to observe the ostriches before getting the opportunity to hand feed the animals, as well as Boer goats and Lorikeets.

The last day of the tour brought the group to the world famous Biosphere 2, originally built to study the proposal of hermetically sealed living areas on other planets. Today, the Biosphere is used by the University of Arizona to conduct climate research.

Before heading home, the group visited the Phoenix Zoo, which houses many exotic creatures and interactive activities, which included feeding sting rays.

The time came that the group had to say “adios” to Arizona and get on a homeward bound plane. Although the activities planned on the trip were fantastic, the students’ general consensus was that the best part of the experience was simply getting to travel together one last time as a group. It was somewhat bittersweet, knowing that everyone will graduate in the spring.

The Newell FFA Senior Class would like to extend their thanks to all of the individuals and businesses that made this trip possible. Sponsors for the trip included: First National Bank of Newell; Bomgaars of Spearfish; Leber Ag Service; K&J Ag Industries; Tri-State Realty; Belle Fourche Vet Clinic; Sack Chiropractic; H.L. Brunner Feedlot; Kitzan Sheep Co.; State Representative Tom Brunner; Paul Hinkhouse; Frank and Sharon Myers; and Kermit and Liz Diers. Students also recognized their chaperones: Danelle Mutchler; Tom Seaman; and especially Kermit Diers, who volunteered a massive amount of his own time planning, organizing and sponsoring the trip.

There’s nothing quite like a South Dakota winter to chill the bones and make one dream of sunny days and lemonade. That being said, 10 seniors from the Newell FFA chapter recently found themselves walking into their summer fantasy of desert paradise on a recent five-day excursion to Tucson, AZ.

On the first day of their journey, Monday, Jan. 10, students flew to Phoenix-Mesa Regional Airport. The more seasoned travelers in the group were entertained by those “newbie” air passengers. After landing and acquiring rental cars, the group drove two hours to their hotel in Marana, AZ.

After a night of sleep, the group was ready to visit the Sonoran Desert Museum within Saguaro National Park. The museum helped students become familiar with desert flora and fauna. Following the museum, students set out on a long drive to the Old West town of Tombstone, AZ, home of the OK Corral. There students wandered the dusty streets and took in a comedic shootout reenactment before reporting to the “Good Enough” silver mine for an underground tour.

During its peak production, the Good Enough Mine was the largest mine in the U.S. The group followed its twists and turns all the while learning about its numerous minerals. The tour guide pointed out a very unique geological structure not seen by many people – an ancient hydrothermal vent containing many mineral crystals. Another interesting aspect of working underground was the lack of depth perception, which the tour guide demonstrated by throwing a rock at the wall – taking much longer to hit the wall than expected. Departing Tombstone, the group experienced passing through a Border Patrol checkpoint, in which everyone was allowed to pass without incident.

On the third day of the trip, the group toured the Green Valley Pecan Company, one of the largest pecan producers in the U.S. The tour consisted of both the nut processing facility and the pecan orchards, of which Green Valley has nearly 5,000 acres. It was interesting to note that all the orchards were flood plain irrigated.

Next up was the ASARCO Mission Copper Mine Complex, where students learned about the extensive refining process for copper ore.

The third day concluded with a stop at the Pima Air and Space Museum, which has one of the nation’s largest warplane collections. One of the aircraft contained in the museum is the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest plane ever built. While leaving the museum, the group unexpectedly witnessed the arrival of Air Force One, carrying President Obama on his way to deliver a memorial speech for those killed in the Tucson, AZ shooting.

Thursday morning found the group on one of the “Sky Islands” of the desert at Picacho Peak State Park. This climb was a four-mile hike, and in many places the use of an anchored cable was needed to pull students up the steep section. Picacho is the heart of the state park which, in part, commemorates the site of the western most battle of the Civil War.

Just outside the Picacho Peak State Park was Rooster Cogburn’s Ostrich Farm, one of the world’s largest ostrich production facilities. Students toured the ranch by monster truck to observe the ostriches before getting the opportunity to hand feed the animals, as well as Boer goats and Lorikeets.

The last day of the tour brought the group to the world famous Biosphere 2, originally built to study the proposal of hermetically sealed living areas on other planets. Today, the Biosphere is used by the University of Arizona to conduct climate research.

Before heading home, the group visited the Phoenix Zoo, which houses many exotic creatures and interactive activities, which included feeding sting rays.

The time came that the group had to say “adios” to Arizona and get on a homeward bound plane. Although the activities planned on the trip were fantastic, the students’ general consensus was that the best part of the experience was simply getting to travel together one last time as a group. It was somewhat bittersweet, knowing that everyone will graduate in the spring.

The Newell FFA Senior Class would like to extend their thanks to all of the individuals and businesses that made this trip possible. Sponsors for the trip included: First National Bank of Newell; Bomgaars of Spearfish; Leber Ag Service; K&J Ag Industries; Tri-State Realty; Belle Fourche Vet Clinic; Sack Chiropractic; H.L. Brunner Feedlot; Kitzan Sheep Co.; State Representative Tom Brunner; Paul Hinkhouse; Frank and Sharon Myers; and Kermit and Liz Diers. Students also recognized their chaperones: Danelle Mutchler; Tom Seaman; and especially Kermit Diers, who volunteered a massive amount of his own time planning, organizing and sponsoring the trip.

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