Next generation rancher committed to quality genetics | TSLN.com

Next generation rancher committed to quality genetics

Amanda Nolz

RAYMOND, SD – Lee Kopriva always knew he wanted to be a cattle rancher. From a young age, he played an active role in his family’s cattle operation, Kopriva Angus. After graduating from South Dakota State University (SDSU) this May, Kopriva is now following his dream of raising quality seedstock for producers, and he is one of the few students in his graduating class to be able to pursue that route.

According to the most recent agriculture census, the average age of a farmer is now 57.1, up from 55.3 years old in 2002. In the years ahead, the nation will watch many ranching operations pass hands. Will these businesses continue to operate, or will they be sold to outside hunting or development interests? Will the next generation be given an opportunity to continue the traditions of food production, or will they be turned away? Without a doubt, it’s a difficult time for beginning farmers and ranchers to start their careers in production agriculture. For Kopriva, this is just an obstacle in his commitment to raise quality Angus genetics.

“It’s pretty difficult for young people to return home to their ranches,” said Kopriva. “A lot of operations aren’t large enough to support another person, and too often, families discourage kids from coming back. For our operation, there is always work to be done, and it’s nice to work alongside my family to accomplish our goals.”

RAYMOND, SD – Lee Kopriva always knew he wanted to be a cattle rancher. From a young age, he played an active role in his family’s cattle operation, Kopriva Angus. After graduating from South Dakota State University (SDSU) this May, Kopriva is now following his dream of raising quality seedstock for producers, and he is one of the few students in his graduating class to be able to pursue that route.

According to the most recent agriculture census, the average age of a farmer is now 57.1, up from 55.3 years old in 2002. In the years ahead, the nation will watch many ranching operations pass hands. Will these businesses continue to operate, or will they be sold to outside hunting or development interests? Will the next generation be given an opportunity to continue the traditions of food production, or will they be turned away? Without a doubt, it’s a difficult time for beginning farmers and ranchers to start their careers in production agriculture. For Kopriva, this is just an obstacle in his commitment to raise quality Angus genetics.

“It’s pretty difficult for young people to return home to their ranches,” said Kopriva. “A lot of operations aren’t large enough to support another person, and too often, families discourage kids from coming back. For our operation, there is always work to be done, and it’s nice to work alongside my family to accomplish our goals.”

Recommended Stories For You

RAYMOND, SD – Lee Kopriva always knew he wanted to be a cattle rancher. From a young age, he played an active role in his family’s cattle operation, Kopriva Angus. After graduating from South Dakota State University (SDSU) this May, Kopriva is now following his dream of raising quality seedstock for producers, and he is one of the few students in his graduating class to be able to pursue that route.

According to the most recent agriculture census, the average age of a farmer is now 57.1, up from 55.3 years old in 2002. In the years ahead, the nation will watch many ranching operations pass hands. Will these businesses continue to operate, or will they be sold to outside hunting or development interests? Will the next generation be given an opportunity to continue the traditions of food production, or will they be turned away? Without a doubt, it’s a difficult time for beginning farmers and ranchers to start their careers in production agriculture. For Kopriva, this is just an obstacle in his commitment to raise quality Angus genetics.

“It’s pretty difficult for young people to return home to their ranches,” said Kopriva. “A lot of operations aren’t large enough to support another person, and too often, families discourage kids from coming back. For our operation, there is always work to be done, and it’s nice to work alongside my family to accomplish our goals.”

tri-state livestock news is proud to congratulate lee kopriva in his decision to stay involved in production agriculture, and we wish him the best of luck in his future endeavors. are you a young person thinking about a career in livestock production? we want to hear from you. email your story to amanda at mandy_nolz@hotmail.com.

Go back to article