NILE club calf event reflects growing interest in Montana | TSLN.com

NILE club calf event reflects growing interest in Montana

Bill Brewster

The growing interest in the club calf show and sale at the Northern International Livestock Exposition (NILE) over the past few years mirrors the growing use of specially-bred club calves in exhibitions across Montana. Although high-quality, structurally sound, straight-bred steers continue to hold their own in the show ring, livestock judges continue to select a large number of crossbred calves with the right conformation for today’s market place. In today’s steer show competition, it’s difficult for young exhibitors to win with just an average calf from Grandpa’s commercial herd.

Jay Nansel, vice president of the NILE and chairman of the club calf committee, agrees interest in Montana’s club calf programs and steers shows is growing.

“We have been out of the main stream in Montana, but it’s starting to take off here,” Nansel says. “It’s been on fire in the Dakotas and in Nebraska and other mid-western states, but now jackpots are really growing here and they are really pretty well attended.

This year, the NILE club calf show is scheduled for 3 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 11, with the sale being held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 12.

Justin Mills, general manager of the NILE, reports the show and sale has seen steady growth.

“Kids can come and buy a steer that has the right genetics to win in the show ring,” Mills says. “We are seeing more intense interest and competition on the breeding side. Each year, the quality of these calves gets better and we are seeing some pretty interesting composite breeding programs represented in the show along with some outstanding purebreds.”

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Mills says he expects entries for this year’s show and sale to come from the Dakotas, Wyoming and Nebraska. Over the past few years, there have been as many as 90 entries in the club calf event.

The growing interest in the club calf show and sale at the Northern International Livestock Exposition (NILE) over the past few years mirrors the growing use of specially-bred club calves in exhibitions across Montana. Although high-quality, structurally sound, straight-bred steers continue to hold their own in the show ring, livestock judges continue to select a large number of crossbred calves with the right conformation for today’s market place. In today’s steer show competition, it’s difficult for young exhibitors to win with just an average calf from Grandpa’s commercial herd.

Jay Nansel, vice president of the NILE and chairman of the club calf committee, agrees interest in Montana’s club calf programs and steers shows is growing.

“We have been out of the main stream in Montana, but it’s starting to take off here,” Nansel says. “It’s been on fire in the Dakotas and in Nebraska and other mid-western states, but now jackpots are really growing here and they are really pretty well attended.

This year, the NILE club calf show is scheduled for 3 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 11, with the sale being held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 12.

Justin Mills, general manager of the NILE, reports the show and sale has seen steady growth.

“Kids can come and buy a steer that has the right genetics to win in the show ring,” Mills says. “We are seeing more intense interest and competition on the breeding side. Each year, the quality of these calves gets better and we are seeing some pretty interesting composite breeding programs represented in the show along with some outstanding purebreds.”

Mills says he expects entries for this year’s show and sale to come from the Dakotas, Wyoming and Nebraska. Over the past few years, there have been as many as 90 entries in the club calf event.

The growing interest in the club calf show and sale at the Northern International Livestock Exposition (NILE) over the past few years mirrors the growing use of specially-bred club calves in exhibitions across Montana. Although high-quality, structurally sound, straight-bred steers continue to hold their own in the show ring, livestock judges continue to select a large number of crossbred calves with the right conformation for today’s market place. In today’s steer show competition, it’s difficult for young exhibitors to win with just an average calf from Grandpa’s commercial herd.

Jay Nansel, vice president of the NILE and chairman of the club calf committee, agrees interest in Montana’s club calf programs and steers shows is growing.

“We have been out of the main stream in Montana, but it’s starting to take off here,” Nansel says. “It’s been on fire in the Dakotas and in Nebraska and other mid-western states, but now jackpots are really growing here and they are really pretty well attended.

This year, the NILE club calf show is scheduled for 3 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 11, with the sale being held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 12.

Justin Mills, general manager of the NILE, reports the show and sale has seen steady growth.

“Kids can come and buy a steer that has the right genetics to win in the show ring,” Mills says. “We are seeing more intense interest and competition on the breeding side. Each year, the quality of these calves gets better and we are seeing some pretty interesting composite breeding programs represented in the show along with some outstanding purebreds.”

Mills says he expects entries for this year’s show and sale to come from the Dakotas, Wyoming and Nebraska. Over the past few years, there have been as many as 90 entries in the club calf event.

The growing interest in the club calf show and sale at the Northern International Livestock Exposition (NILE) over the past few years mirrors the growing use of specially-bred club calves in exhibitions across Montana. Although high-quality, structurally sound, straight-bred steers continue to hold their own in the show ring, livestock judges continue to select a large number of crossbred calves with the right conformation for today’s market place. In today’s steer show competition, it’s difficult for young exhibitors to win with just an average calf from Grandpa’s commercial herd.

Jay Nansel, vice president of the NILE and chairman of the club calf committee, agrees interest in Montana’s club calf programs and steers shows is growing.

“We have been out of the main stream in Montana, but it’s starting to take off here,” Nansel says. “It’s been on fire in the Dakotas and in Nebraska and other mid-western states, but now jackpots are really growing here and they are really pretty well attended.

This year, the NILE club calf show is scheduled for 3 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 11, with the sale being held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 12.

Justin Mills, general manager of the NILE, reports the show and sale has seen steady growth.

“Kids can come and buy a steer that has the right genetics to win in the show ring,” Mills says. “We are seeing more intense interest and competition on the breeding side. Each year, the quality of these calves gets better and we are seeing some pretty interesting composite breeding programs represented in the show along with some outstanding purebreds.”

Mills says he expects entries for this year’s show and sale to come from the Dakotas, Wyoming and Nebraska. Over the past few years, there have been as many as 90 entries in the club calf event.

The growing interest in the club calf show and sale at the Northern International Livestock Exposition (NILE) over the past few years mirrors the growing use of specially-bred club calves in exhibitions across Montana. Although high-quality, structurally sound, straight-bred steers continue to hold their own in the show ring, livestock judges continue to select a large number of crossbred calves with the right conformation for today’s market place. In today’s steer show competition, it’s difficult for young exhibitors to win with just an average calf from Grandpa’s commercial herd.

Jay Nansel, vice president of the NILE and chairman of the club calf committee, agrees interest in Montana’s club calf programs and steers shows is growing.

“We have been out of the main stream in Montana, but it’s starting to take off here,” Nansel says. “It’s been on fire in the Dakotas and in Nebraska and other mid-western states, but now jackpots are really growing here and they are really pretty well attended.

This year, the NILE club calf show is scheduled for 3 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 11, with the sale being held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 12.

Justin Mills, general manager of the NILE, reports the show and sale has seen steady growth.

“Kids can come and buy a steer that has the right genetics to win in the show ring,” Mills says. “We are seeing more intense interest and competition on the breeding side. Each year, the quality of these calves gets better and we are seeing some pretty interesting composite breeding programs represented in the show along with some outstanding purebreds.”

Mills says he expects entries for this year’s show and sale to come from the Dakotas, Wyoming and Nebraska. Over the past few years, there have been as many as 90 entries in the club calf event.

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