Producers weigh in on anti-agriculture threats | TSLN.com

Producers weigh in on anti-agriculture threats

Amanda Nolz

“How many of you would have came here today if this summer meeting was advertised as an animal welfare conference?” asked Jim Krantz, Miner County Extension educator at the Summer Feedlot & Marketing Considerations Meeting held at Wobig Farms in Canova, SD on July 7, 2010.

Only two people in the seventy-plus crowd raised their hands, and yet, amidst the topics of summer bunk management, heat stress, livestock insurance, marketing, carcass quality and mixing feed, the South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service felt it was important to warn producers about the threat of animal rights activists, specifically the Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS).

“HSUS is not a real humane society; it’s not associated with pet shelters anywhere,” explained Krantz. “HSUS gives less than one-half of one percent of its $100 million budget to hands-on pet shelters. Yet, $2.5 million of Americans’ donations went to HSUS employee pension plans.”

Despite the ugly reputation HSUS is slowly earning, 83 percent of Americans have a favorable view of HSUS, according to HumaneWatch.org, a Web site working to expose the animal rights organization for its deceitful use of goodwill donations. Worst of all, one in four Americans believe animals deserve the same rights as people.

“I think it’s important to distinguish between animal rights and animal welfare,” said Krantz. “Animal welfare, by definition, is the humane treatment of animals, while animal rights is the belief that animals should have the same rights and be treated the same as humans. As beef producers, I think we all agree with the terms of animal welfare, and we work hard to take care of our animals. It’s imperative, as cattle producers, to be aware of organizations like HSUS, who are working to put us out of business. We all have our jobs to do, but we can’t ignore this big issue.”

“How many of you would have came here today if this summer meeting was advertised as an animal welfare conference?” asked Jim Krantz, Miner County Extension educator at the Summer Feedlot & Marketing Considerations Meeting held at Wobig Farms in Canova, SD on July 7, 2010.

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Only two people in the seventy-plus crowd raised their hands, and yet, amidst the topics of summer bunk management, heat stress, livestock insurance, marketing, carcass quality and mixing feed, the South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service felt it was important to warn producers about the threat of animal rights activists, specifically the Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS).

“HSUS is not a real humane society; it’s not associated with pet shelters anywhere,” explained Krantz. “HSUS gives less than one-half of one percent of its $100 million budget to hands-on pet shelters. Yet, $2.5 million of Americans’ donations went to HSUS employee pension plans.”

Despite the ugly reputation HSUS is slowly earning, 83 percent of Americans have a favorable view of HSUS, according to HumaneWatch.org, a Web site working to expose the animal rights organization for its deceitful use of goodwill donations. Worst of all, one in four Americans believe animals deserve the same rights as people.

“I think it’s important to distinguish between animal rights and animal welfare,” said Krantz. “Animal welfare, by definition, is the humane treatment of animals, while animal rights is the belief that animals should have the same rights and be treated the same as humans. As beef producers, I think we all agree with the terms of animal welfare, and we work hard to take care of our animals. It’s imperative, as cattle producers, to be aware of organizations like HSUS, who are working to put us out of business. We all have our jobs to do, but we can’t ignore this big issue.”

“How many of you would have came here today if this summer meeting was advertised as an animal welfare conference?” asked Jim Krantz, Miner County Extension educator at the Summer Feedlot & Marketing Considerations Meeting held at Wobig Farms in Canova, SD on July 7, 2010.

Only two people in the seventy-plus crowd raised their hands, and yet, amidst the topics of summer bunk management, heat stress, livestock insurance, marketing, carcass quality and mixing feed, the South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service felt it was important to warn producers about the threat of animal rights activists, specifically the Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS).

“HSUS is not a real humane society; it’s not associated with pet shelters anywhere,” explained Krantz. “HSUS gives less than one-half of one percent of its $100 million budget to hands-on pet shelters. Yet, $2.5 million of Americans’ donations went to HSUS employee pension plans.”

Despite the ugly reputation HSUS is slowly earning, 83 percent of Americans have a favorable view of HSUS, according to HumaneWatch.org, a Web site working to expose the animal rights organization for its deceitful use of goodwill donations. Worst of all, one in four Americans believe animals deserve the same rights as people.

“I think it’s important to distinguish between animal rights and animal welfare,” said Krantz. “Animal welfare, by definition, is the humane treatment of animals, while animal rights is the belief that animals should have the same rights and be treated the same as humans. As beef producers, I think we all agree with the terms of animal welfare, and we work hard to take care of our animals. It’s imperative, as cattle producers, to be aware of organizations like HSUS, who are working to put us out of business. We all have our jobs to do, but we can’t ignore this big issue.”

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