Ranch feature: Kendrick and Sharon Redland, Redland Angus | TSLN.com

Ranch feature: Kendrick and Sharon Redland, Redland Angus

Courtesy photoRedland Angus receives about six inches of precipitation a year. Cattle spend the summer in the Big Horn Mountains and are moved to low country in the winter.

Customers who attend an annual production sale at Redland Angus can expect to see deep bodied, easy-fleshing cattle that perform well in range conditions. Redland Angus has spent years building up a herd of easy-doing black Angus cattle that can graze year-around.

Kendrick and Sharon Redland, who make their home in Manderson, WY, both come from commercial ranching backgrounds in the area. They started their registered Angus business in 1979. “With the registered cows, we calved in late January, and ran most everything through the barn. It was very hands-on and labor-intensive,” Kendrick recalls. “It was a lot different management-wise than the commercial operation we were running.”

By the mid-1990s, they had built the numbers up in their registered operation and decided to start running their registered cattle like the commercial herds. The first year, they artificially inseminated (AI-ed) the yearling heifers and older cows from their registered herd. The rest of the cows were turned out to grass, and were AI-ed during the first part of September to calve in mid-June. From that point on, the Redland’s have managed two separate herds that calve the first of March and June 15.

Customers who attend an annual production sale at Redland Angus can expect to see deep bodied, easy-fleshing cattle that perform well in range conditions. Redland Angus has spent years building up a herd of easy-doing black Angus cattle that can graze year-around.

Kendrick and Sharon Redland, who make their home in Manderson, WY, both come from commercial ranching backgrounds in the area. They started their registered Angus business in 1979. “With the registered cows, we calved in late January, and ran most everything through the barn. It was very hands-on and labor-intensive,” Kendrick recalls. “It was a lot different management-wise than the commercial operation we were running.”

By the mid-1990s, they had built the numbers up in their registered operation and decided to start running their registered cattle like the commercial herds. The first year, they artificially inseminated (AI-ed) the yearling heifers and older cows from their registered herd. The rest of the cows were turned out to grass, and were AI-ed during the first part of September to calve in mid-June. From that point on, the Redland’s have managed two separate herds that calve the first of March and June 15.

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Customers who attend an annual production sale at Redland Angus can expect to see deep bodied, easy-fleshing cattle that perform well in range conditions. Redland Angus has spent years building up a herd of easy-doing black Angus cattle that can graze year-around.

Kendrick and Sharon Redland, who make their home in Manderson, WY, both come from commercial ranching backgrounds in the area. They started their registered Angus business in 1979. “With the registered cows, we calved in late January, and ran most everything through the barn. It was very hands-on and labor-intensive,” Kendrick recalls. “It was a lot different management-wise than the commercial operation we were running.”

By the mid-1990s, they had built the numbers up in their registered operation and decided to start running their registered cattle like the commercial herds. The first year, they artificially inseminated (AI-ed) the yearling heifers and older cows from their registered herd. The rest of the cows were turned out to grass, and were AI-ed during the first part of September to calve in mid-June. From that point on, the Redland’s have managed two separate herds that calve the first of March and June 15.

Customers who attend an annual production sale at Redland Angus can expect to see deep bodied, easy-fleshing cattle that perform well in range conditions. Redland Angus has spent years building up a herd of easy-doing black Angus cattle that can graze year-around.

Kendrick and Sharon Redland, who make their home in Manderson, WY, both come from commercial ranching backgrounds in the area. They started their registered Angus business in 1979. “With the registered cows, we calved in late January, and ran most everything through the barn. It was very hands-on and labor-intensive,” Kendrick recalls. “It was a lot different management-wise than the commercial operation we were running.”

By the mid-1990s, they had built the numbers up in their registered operation and decided to start running their registered cattle like the commercial herds. The first year, they artificially inseminated (AI-ed) the yearling heifers and older cows from their registered herd. The rest of the cows were turned out to grass, and were AI-ed during the first part of September to calve in mid-June. From that point on, the Redland’s have managed two separate herds that calve the first of March and June 15.

editor’s note: redland angus will hold their winter production sale jan. 15, 2011. approximately 100 head of angus bulls will sell. for more information about redland angus, visit http://redlandangus.com, or call 307-347-2270.

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