Randy Steinke and Jan Swan Wood work together to ensure horse sale success | TSLN.com

Randy Steinke and Jan Swan Wood work together to ensure horse sale success

Doris Lauing

At a horse sale, most people think the most important job is the auctioneer’s because they sell the horse. While that may be true, it is equally important to have someone talk pedigrees. This invaluable information is important to those that are seeking a horse for a certain discipline, or to breed. Most horse sales provide a catalog with a description of the horses and its abilities, but not many have the space to document the generations before or the progeny of each animal. That is when the job of a pedigree reader becomes necessary.

Like a well-oiled machine, auctioneer Randy Steinke of Colome, SD, and Jan Swan Wood of Newell, SD, partner together to create poetry in motion. The pedigree reader introduces each animal to the sale ring and the auctioneer starts his cry asking for bids. Once the animal has reached a certain price, bidding slows down and the pedigree reader chimes in and contributes information about the horse. With another smooth transition, the auctioneer resumes his cry for a higher bid. This may happen two or three times throughout the sale of one horse. When the auctioneer marks the animal sold, the animal leaves the ring and the process starts all over again.

Randy and Jan shared the auction block on many occasions and have developed a hand-in-glove relationship. Here’s how each got started in their craft.

At a horse sale, most people think the most important job is the auctioneer’s because they sell the horse. While that may be true, it is equally important to have someone talk pedigrees. This invaluable information is important to those that are seeking a horse for a certain discipline, or to breed. Most horse sales provide a catalog with a description of the horses and its abilities, but not many have the space to document the generations before or the progeny of each animal. That is when the job of a pedigree reader becomes necessary.

Like a well-oiled machine, auctioneer Randy Steinke of Colome, SD, and Jan Swan Wood of Newell, SD, partner together to create poetry in motion. The pedigree reader introduces each animal to the sale ring and the auctioneer starts his cry asking for bids. Once the animal has reached a certain price, bidding slows down and the pedigree reader chimes in and contributes information about the horse. With another smooth transition, the auctioneer resumes his cry for a higher bid. This may happen two or three times throughout the sale of one horse. When the auctioneer marks the animal sold, the animal leaves the ring and the process starts all over again.

Randy and Jan shared the auction block on many occasions and have developed a hand-in-glove relationship. Here’s how each got started in their craft.

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At a horse sale, most people think the most important job is the auctioneer’s because they sell the horse. While that may be true, it is equally important to have someone talk pedigrees. This invaluable information is important to those that are seeking a horse for a certain discipline, or to breed. Most horse sales provide a catalog with a description of the horses and its abilities, but not many have the space to document the generations before or the progeny of each animal. That is when the job of a pedigree reader becomes necessary.

Like a well-oiled machine, auctioneer Randy Steinke of Colome, SD, and Jan Swan Wood of Newell, SD, partner together to create poetry in motion. The pedigree reader introduces each animal to the sale ring and the auctioneer starts his cry asking for bids. Once the animal has reached a certain price, bidding slows down and the pedigree reader chimes in and contributes information about the horse. With another smooth transition, the auctioneer resumes his cry for a higher bid. This may happen two or three times throughout the sale of one horse. When the auctioneer marks the animal sold, the animal leaves the ring and the process starts all over again.

Randy and Jan shared the auction block on many occasions and have developed a hand-in-glove relationship. Here’s how each got started in their craft.

At a horse sale, most people think the most important job is the auctioneer’s because they sell the horse. While that may be true, it is equally important to have someone talk pedigrees. This invaluable information is important to those that are seeking a horse for a certain discipline, or to breed. Most horse sales provide a catalog with a description of the horses and its abilities, but not many have the space to document the generations before or the progeny of each animal. That is when the job of a pedigree reader becomes necessary.

Like a well-oiled machine, auctioneer Randy Steinke of Colome, SD, and Jan Swan Wood of Newell, SD, partner together to create poetry in motion. The pedigree reader introduces each animal to the sale ring and the auctioneer starts his cry asking for bids. Once the animal has reached a certain price, bidding slows down and the pedigree reader chimes in and contributes information about the horse. With another smooth transition, the auctioneer resumes his cry for a higher bid. This may happen two or three times throughout the sale of one horse. When the auctioneer marks the animal sold, the animal leaves the ring and the process starts all over again.

Randy and Jan shared the auction block on many occasions and have developed a hand-in-glove relationship. Here’s how each got started in their craft.

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