Results from the Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition | TSLN.com

Results from the Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition

Starla Lyon

Submitted photosTim Schaack, Edgemont, SD, riding COOKIE, owned by Tony Schwader.

The 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition was a huge success this year according to fair organizers. Entries from throughout the region impressed a large crowd gathered to watch the event on Aug. 21, which was free to the public.

The horse committee for both the Central States Fair and Black Hills Stock Show has been undergoing some changes lately. While they have been re-organizing a bit, everyone seemed optimistic about upcoming events and plans are already in the works for the Black Hills Stock Show and horse sale, according to the committee.

Ranch horse competitions provide a unique opportunity for anyone to enter and compete. While there are different categories including a novice competition, these shows are open to anyone who wants to enter. They provide a great opportunity for both the horse and rider to gain confidence, show their abilities and possibly win a number of prestigious awards. There are several competitions held throughout the area and with each event, it becomes more evident that the sport is gaining popularity.

“It’s a more relaxed event,” said Clara Wilson of Newcastle, WY. “It’s a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try it and it’s also nice to just go and watch and visit with people.”

While the patterns for the competitions may vary a bit, they are always practical and good exercises for both the horse and rider. Often there are basic horsemanship maneuvers such as lead changes and roll backs. There is also normally a demonstration of how a horse handles pulling, walking over a bridge or poles and opening or shutting a gate. Sometimes there is a test of how a horse handles not only being in town often for the first time, but the sights and sounds of a new arena and maybe a slicker hanging from a post that needs to be picked up during the timed competition.

In addition to the pattern and tests, the horse and rider must also work a cow. While the men must sort an animal out of the herd and then rope it, the ladies do not have to rope. If the horse in the competition is a three year old, the rope is a break away instead of tied hard and fast or dallying.

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“Any horse is eligible for these competitions,” said committee member Dave Lindblom. “We’re very happy with the turnout this year and we’re always striving for more horses and ranches to get involved. I think these competitions will really help the horse industry. It gives a rancher the chance to show their horse’s ability and it gives the people from town the opportunity to see some really good horses and horsemanship.”

New ranch horse competitions are cropping up throughout the region each year as annual events. Thanks to so many people who are dedicated to promoting and supporting these competitions, we can all look forward to watching or even competing in several within the area.

Following are the results from the 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition.

The High Point Ladies Rider went to Jecca Ostrander from Gordon, NE. High Point Men’s Rider went to Tim Schaack from Edgemont, SD. The judges awarded the Hard Luck Award to Stan Rennard of Lusk, WY, in the Rancher Division for the cow that he drew. High Point Horse for the day went to CUTTER’S MIA, owned and ridden by Marla and Robert Shelbourn from Valentine, NE.

The 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition was a huge success this year according to fair organizers. Entries from throughout the region impressed a large crowd gathered to watch the event on Aug. 21, which was free to the public.

The horse committee for both the Central States Fair and Black Hills Stock Show has been undergoing some changes lately. While they have been re-organizing a bit, everyone seemed optimistic about upcoming events and plans are already in the works for the Black Hills Stock Show and horse sale, according to the committee.

Ranch horse competitions provide a unique opportunity for anyone to enter and compete. While there are different categories including a novice competition, these shows are open to anyone who wants to enter. They provide a great opportunity for both the horse and rider to gain confidence, show their abilities and possibly win a number of prestigious awards. There are several competitions held throughout the area and with each event, it becomes more evident that the sport is gaining popularity.

“It’s a more relaxed event,” said Clara Wilson of Newcastle, WY. “It’s a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try it and it’s also nice to just go and watch and visit with people.”

While the patterns for the competitions may vary a bit, they are always practical and good exercises for both the horse and rider. Often there are basic horsemanship maneuvers such as lead changes and roll backs. There is also normally a demonstration of how a horse handles pulling, walking over a bridge or poles and opening or shutting a gate. Sometimes there is a test of how a horse handles not only being in town often for the first time, but the sights and sounds of a new arena and maybe a slicker hanging from a post that needs to be picked up during the timed competition.

In addition to the pattern and tests, the horse and rider must also work a cow. While the men must sort an animal out of the herd and then rope it, the ladies do not have to rope. If the horse in the competition is a three year old, the rope is a break away instead of tied hard and fast or dallying.

“Any horse is eligible for these competitions,” said committee member Dave Lindblom. “We’re very happy with the turnout this year and we’re always striving for more horses and ranches to get involved. I think these competitions will really help the horse industry. It gives a rancher the chance to show their horse’s ability and it gives the people from town the opportunity to see some really good horses and horsemanship.”

New ranch horse competitions are cropping up throughout the region each year as annual events. Thanks to so many people who are dedicated to promoting and supporting these competitions, we can all look forward to watching or even competing in several within the area.

Following are the results from the 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition.

The High Point Ladies Rider went to Jecca Ostrander from Gordon, NE. High Point Men’s Rider went to Tim Schaack from Edgemont, SD. The judges awarded the Hard Luck Award to Stan Rennard of Lusk, WY, in the Rancher Division for the cow that he drew. High Point Horse for the day went to CUTTER’S MIA, owned and ridden by Marla and Robert Shelbourn from Valentine, NE.

The 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition was a huge success this year according to fair organizers. Entries from throughout the region impressed a large crowd gathered to watch the event on Aug. 21, which was free to the public.

The horse committee for both the Central States Fair and Black Hills Stock Show has been undergoing some changes lately. While they have been re-organizing a bit, everyone seemed optimistic about upcoming events and plans are already in the works for the Black Hills Stock Show and horse sale, according to the committee.

Ranch horse competitions provide a unique opportunity for anyone to enter and compete. While there are different categories including a novice competition, these shows are open to anyone who wants to enter. They provide a great opportunity for both the horse and rider to gain confidence, show their abilities and possibly win a number of prestigious awards. There are several competitions held throughout the area and with each event, it becomes more evident that the sport is gaining popularity.

“It’s a more relaxed event,” said Clara Wilson of Newcastle, WY. “It’s a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try it and it’s also nice to just go and watch and visit with people.”

While the patterns for the competitions may vary a bit, they are always practical and good exercises for both the horse and rider. Often there are basic horsemanship maneuvers such as lead changes and roll backs. There is also normally a demonstration of how a horse handles pulling, walking over a bridge or poles and opening or shutting a gate. Sometimes there is a test of how a horse handles not only being in town often for the first time, but the sights and sounds of a new arena and maybe a slicker hanging from a post that needs to be picked up during the timed competition.

In addition to the pattern and tests, the horse and rider must also work a cow. While the men must sort an animal out of the herd and then rope it, the ladies do not have to rope. If the horse in the competition is a three year old, the rope is a break away instead of tied hard and fast or dallying.

“Any horse is eligible for these competitions,” said committee member Dave Lindblom. “We’re very happy with the turnout this year and we’re always striving for more horses and ranches to get involved. I think these competitions will really help the horse industry. It gives a rancher the chance to show their horse’s ability and it gives the people from town the opportunity to see some really good horses and horsemanship.”

New ranch horse competitions are cropping up throughout the region each year as annual events. Thanks to so many people who are dedicated to promoting and supporting these competitions, we can all look forward to watching or even competing in several within the area.

Following are the results from the 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition.

The High Point Ladies Rider went to Jecca Ostrander from Gordon, NE. High Point Men’s Rider went to Tim Schaack from Edgemont, SD. The judges awarded the Hard Luck Award to Stan Rennard of Lusk, WY, in the Rancher Division for the cow that he drew. High Point Horse for the day went to CUTTER’S MIA, owned and ridden by Marla and Robert Shelbourn from Valentine, NE.

The 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition was a huge success this year according to fair organizers. Entries from throughout the region impressed a large crowd gathered to watch the event on Aug. 21, which was free to the public.

The horse committee for both the Central States Fair and Black Hills Stock Show has been undergoing some changes lately. While they have been re-organizing a bit, everyone seemed optimistic about upcoming events and plans are already in the works for the Black Hills Stock Show and horse sale, according to the committee.

Ranch horse competitions provide a unique opportunity for anyone to enter and compete. While there are different categories including a novice competition, these shows are open to anyone who wants to enter. They provide a great opportunity for both the horse and rider to gain confidence, show their abilities and possibly win a number of prestigious awards. There are several competitions held throughout the area and with each event, it becomes more evident that the sport is gaining popularity.

“It’s a more relaxed event,” said Clara Wilson of Newcastle, WY. “It’s a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try it and it’s also nice to just go and watch and visit with people.”

While the patterns for the competitions may vary a bit, they are always practical and good exercises for both the horse and rider. Often there are basic horsemanship maneuvers such as lead changes and roll backs. There is also normally a demonstration of how a horse handles pulling, walking over a bridge or poles and opening or shutting a gate. Sometimes there is a test of how a horse handles not only being in town often for the first time, but the sights and sounds of a new arena and maybe a slicker hanging from a post that needs to be picked up during the timed competition.

In addition to the pattern and tests, the horse and rider must also work a cow. While the men must sort an animal out of the herd and then rope it, the ladies do not have to rope. If the horse in the competition is a three year old, the rope is a break away instead of tied hard and fast or dallying.

“Any horse is eligible for these competitions,” said committee member Dave Lindblom. “We’re very happy with the turnout this year and we’re always striving for more horses and ranches to get involved. I think these competitions will really help the horse industry. It gives a rancher the chance to show their horse’s ability and it gives the people from town the opportunity to see some really good horses and horsemanship.”

New ranch horse competitions are cropping up throughout the region each year as annual events. Thanks to so many people who are dedicated to promoting and supporting these competitions, we can all look forward to watching or even competing in several within the area.

Following are the results from the 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition.

The High Point Ladies Rider went to Jecca Ostrander from Gordon, NE. High Point Men’s Rider went to Tim Schaack from Edgemont, SD. The judges awarded the Hard Luck Award to Stan Rennard of Lusk, WY, in the Rancher Division for the cow that he drew. High Point Horse for the day went to CUTTER’S MIA, owned and ridden by Marla and Robert Shelbourn from Valentine, NE.

The 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition was a huge success this year according to fair organizers. Entries from throughout the region impressed a large crowd gathered to watch the event on Aug. 21, which was free to the public.

The horse committee for both the Central States Fair and Black Hills Stock Show has been undergoing some changes lately. While they have been re-organizing a bit, everyone seemed optimistic about upcoming events and plans are already in the works for the Black Hills Stock Show and horse sale, according to the committee.

Ranch horse competitions provide a unique opportunity for anyone to enter and compete. While there are different categories including a novice competition, these shows are open to anyone who wants to enter. They provide a great opportunity for both the horse and rider to gain confidence, show their abilities and possibly win a number of prestigious awards. There are several competitions held throughout the area and with each event, it becomes more evident that the sport is gaining popularity.

“It’s a more relaxed event,” said Clara Wilson of Newcastle, WY. “It’s a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try it and it’s also nice to just go and watch and visit with people.”

While the patterns for the competitions may vary a bit, they are always practical and good exercises for both the horse and rider. Often there are basic horsemanship maneuvers such as lead changes and roll backs. There is also normally a demonstration of how a horse handles pulling, walking over a bridge or poles and opening or shutting a gate. Sometimes there is a test of how a horse handles not only being in town often for the first time, but the sights and sounds of a new arena and maybe a slicker hanging from a post that needs to be picked up during the timed competition.

In addition to the pattern and tests, the horse and rider must also work a cow. While the men must sort an animal out of the herd and then rope it, the ladies do not have to rope. If the horse in the competition is a three year old, the rope is a break away instead of tied hard and fast or dallying.

“Any horse is eligible for these competitions,” said committee member Dave Lindblom. “We’re very happy with the turnout this year and we’re always striving for more horses and ranches to get involved. I think these competitions will really help the horse industry. It gives a rancher the chance to show their horse’s ability and it gives the people from town the opportunity to see some really good horses and horsemanship.”

New ranch horse competitions are cropping up throughout the region each year as annual events. Thanks to so many people who are dedicated to promoting and supporting these competitions, we can all look forward to watching or even competing in several within the area.

Following are the results from the 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition.

The High Point Ladies Rider went to Jecca Ostrander from Gordon, NE. High Point Men’s Rider went to Tim Schaack from Edgemont, SD. The judges awarded the Hard Luck Award to Stan Rennard of Lusk, WY, in the Rancher Division for the cow that he drew. High Point Horse for the day went to CUTTER’S MIA, owned and ridden by Marla and Robert Shelbourn from Valentine, NE.

The 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition was a huge success this year according to fair organizers. Entries from throughout the region impressed a large crowd gathered to watch the event on Aug. 21, which was free to the public.

The horse committee for both the Central States Fair and Black Hills Stock Show has been undergoing some changes lately. While they have been re-organizing a bit, everyone seemed optimistic about upcoming events and plans are already in the works for the Black Hills Stock Show and horse sale, according to the committee.

Ranch horse competitions provide a unique opportunity for anyone to enter and compete. While there are different categories including a novice competition, these shows are open to anyone who wants to enter. They provide a great opportunity for both the horse and rider to gain confidence, show their abilities and possibly win a number of prestigious awards. There are several competitions held throughout the area and with each event, it becomes more evident that the sport is gaining popularity.

“It’s a more relaxed event,” said Clara Wilson of Newcastle, WY. “It’s a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try it and it’s also nice to just go and watch and visit with people.”

While the patterns for the competitions may vary a bit, they are always practical and good exercises for both the horse and rider. Often there are basic horsemanship maneuvers such as lead changes and roll backs. There is also normally a demonstration of how a horse handles pulling, walking over a bridge or poles and opening or shutting a gate. Sometimes there is a test of how a horse handles not only being in town often for the first time, but the sights and sounds of a new arena and maybe a slicker hanging from a post that needs to be picked up during the timed competition.

In addition to the pattern and tests, the horse and rider must also work a cow. While the men must sort an animal out of the herd and then rope it, the ladies do not have to rope. If the horse in the competition is a three year old, the rope is a break away instead of tied hard and fast or dallying.

“Any horse is eligible for these competitions,” said committee member Dave Lindblom. “We’re very happy with the turnout this year and we’re always striving for more horses and ranches to get involved. I think these competitions will really help the horse industry. It gives a rancher the chance to show their horse’s ability and it gives the people from town the opportunity to see some really good horses and horsemanship.”

New ranch horse competitions are cropping up throughout the region each year as annual events. Thanks to so many people who are dedicated to promoting and supporting these competitions, we can all look forward to watching or even competing in several within the area.

Following are the results from the 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition.

The High Point Ladies Rider went to Jecca Ostrander from Gordon, NE. High Point Men’s Rider went to Tim Schaack from Edgemont, SD. The judges awarded the Hard Luck Award to Stan Rennard of Lusk, WY, in the Rancher Division for the cow that he drew. High Point Horse for the day went to CUTTER’S MIA, owned and ridden by Marla and Robert Shelbourn from Valentine, NE.

The 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition was a huge success this year according to fair organizers. Entries from throughout the region impressed a large crowd gathered to watch the event on Aug. 21, which was free to the public.

The horse committee for both the Central States Fair and Black Hills Stock Show has been undergoing some changes lately. While they have been re-organizing a bit, everyone seemed optimistic about upcoming events and plans are already in the works for the Black Hills Stock Show and horse sale, according to the committee.

Ranch horse competitions provide a unique opportunity for anyone to enter and compete. While there are different categories including a novice competition, these shows are open to anyone who wants to enter. They provide a great opportunity for both the horse and rider to gain confidence, show their abilities and possibly win a number of prestigious awards. There are several competitions held throughout the area and with each event, it becomes more evident that the sport is gaining popularity.

“It’s a more relaxed event,” said Clara Wilson of Newcastle, WY. “It’s a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try it and it’s also nice to just go and watch and visit with people.”

While the patterns for the competitions may vary a bit, they are always practical and good exercises for both the horse and rider. Often there are basic horsemanship maneuvers such as lead changes and roll backs. There is also normally a demonstration of how a horse handles pulling, walking over a bridge or poles and opening or shutting a gate. Sometimes there is a test of how a horse handles not only being in town often for the first time, but the sights and sounds of a new arena and maybe a slicker hanging from a post that needs to be picked up during the timed competition.

In addition to the pattern and tests, the horse and rider must also work a cow. While the men must sort an animal out of the herd and then rope it, the ladies do not have to rope. If the horse in the competition is a three year old, the rope is a break away instead of tied hard and fast or dallying.

“Any horse is eligible for these competitions,” said committee member Dave Lindblom. “We’re very happy with the turnout this year and we’re always striving for more horses and ranches to get involved. I think these competitions will really help the horse industry. It gives a rancher the chance to show their horse’s ability and it gives the people from town the opportunity to see some really good horses and horsemanship.”

New ranch horse competitions are cropping up throughout the region each year as annual events. Thanks to so many people who are dedicated to promoting and supporting these competitions, we can all look forward to watching or even competing in several within the area.

Following are the results from the 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition.

The High Point Ladies Rider went to Jecca Ostrander from Gordon, NE. High Point Men’s Rider went to Tim Schaack from Edgemont, SD. The judges awarded the Hard Luck Award to Stan Rennard of Lusk, WY, in the Rancher Division for the cow that he drew. High Point Horse for the day went to CUTTER’S MIA, owned and ridden by Marla and Robert Shelbourn from Valentine, NE.

The 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition was a huge success this year according to fair organizers. Entries from throughout the region impressed a large crowd gathered to watch the event on Aug. 21, which was free to the public.

The horse committee for both the Central States Fair and Black Hills Stock Show has been undergoing some changes lately. While they have been re-organizing a bit, everyone seemed optimistic about upcoming events and plans are already in the works for the Black Hills Stock Show and horse sale, according to the committee.

Ranch horse competitions provide a unique opportunity for anyone to enter and compete. While there are different categories including a novice competition, these shows are open to anyone who wants to enter. They provide a great opportunity for both the horse and rider to gain confidence, show their abilities and possibly win a number of prestigious awards. There are several competitions held throughout the area and with each event, it becomes more evident that the sport is gaining popularity.

“It’s a more relaxed event,” said Clara Wilson of Newcastle, WY. “It’s a good opportunity for anyone who wants to try it and it’s also nice to just go and watch and visit with people.”

While the patterns for the competitions may vary a bit, they are always practical and good exercises for both the horse and rider. Often there are basic horsemanship maneuvers such as lead changes and roll backs. There is also normally a demonstration of how a horse handles pulling, walking over a bridge or poles and opening or shutting a gate. Sometimes there is a test of how a horse handles not only being in town often for the first time, but the sights and sounds of a new arena and maybe a slicker hanging from a post that needs to be picked up during the timed competition.

In addition to the pattern and tests, the horse and rider must also work a cow. While the men must sort an animal out of the herd and then rope it, the ladies do not have to rope. If the horse in the competition is a three year old, the rope is a break away instead of tied hard and fast or dallying.

“Any horse is eligible for these competitions,” said committee member Dave Lindblom. “We’re very happy with the turnout this year and we’re always striving for more horses and ranches to get involved. I think these competitions will really help the horse industry. It gives a rancher the chance to show their horse’s ability and it gives the people from town the opportunity to see some really good horses and horsemanship.”

New ranch horse competitions are cropping up throughout the region each year as annual events. Thanks to so many people who are dedicated to promoting and supporting these competitions, we can all look forward to watching or even competing in several within the area.

Following are the results from the 2008 Central States Fair Ranch Horse Competition.

The High Point Ladies Rider went to Jecca Ostrander from Gordon, NE. High Point Men’s Rider went to Tim Schaack from Edgemont, SD. The judges awarded the Hard Luck Award to Stan Rennard of Lusk, WY, in the Rancher Division for the cow that he drew. High Point Horse for the day went to CUTTER’S MIA, owned and ridden by Marla and Robert Shelbourn from Valentine, NE.

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