Richard Randle: Diagnosing reproductive issues important for cow-calf profitability | TSLN.com

Richard Randle: Diagnosing reproductive issues important for cow-calf profitability

Gayle Smith

In any cow-calf operation, a producer’s aim is to get a live calf on the ground, preferably towards the beginning of the calving season. When this doesn’t happen, it may be time to pinpoint the problem. Dr. Richard Randle, beef extension veterinarian with the University of Nebraska, offered producers tips on how to diagnose reproductive issues in a cow-calf operation during Cattlemen’s Day, Jan. 26, 2011, at the Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory in Whitman, NE.

“The primary goal in any cow-calf operation is to get a high number of cows pregnant in a timely manner,” Randle told the crowd of nearly 100 producers. If producers are starting to see too many open cows, late calving cows, and a strung out breeding season, without an explanation, they may need to study their breeding program more closely to determine the cause.

In any cow-calf operation, a producer’s aim is to get a live calf on the ground, preferably towards the beginning of the calving season. When this doesn’t happen, it may be time to pinpoint the problem. Dr. Richard Randle, beef extension veterinarian with the University of Nebraska, offered producers tips on how to diagnose reproductive issues in a cow-calf operation during Cattlemen’s Day, Jan. 26, 2011, at the Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory in Whitman, NE.

“The primary goal in any cow-calf operation is to get a high number of cows pregnant in a timely manner,” Randle told the crowd of nearly 100 producers. If producers are starting to see too many open cows, late calving cows, and a strung out breeding season, without an explanation, they may need to study their breeding program more closely to determine the cause.

In any cow-calf operation, a producer’s aim is to get a live calf on the ground, preferably towards the beginning of the calving season. When this doesn’t happen, it may be time to pinpoint the problem. Dr. Richard Randle, beef extension veterinarian with the University of Nebraska, offered producers tips on how to diagnose reproductive issues in a cow-calf operation during Cattlemen’s Day, Jan. 26, 2011, at the Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory in Whitman, NE.

“The primary goal in any cow-calf operation is to get a high number of cows pregnant in a timely manner,” Randle told the crowd of nearly 100 producers. If producers are starting to see too many open cows, late calving cows, and a strung out breeding season, without an explanation, they may need to study their breeding program more closely to determine the cause.

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In any cow-calf operation, a producer’s aim is to get a live calf on the ground, preferably towards the beginning of the calving season. When this doesn’t happen, it may be time to pinpoint the problem. Dr. Richard Randle, beef extension veterinarian with the University of Nebraska, offered producers tips on how to diagnose reproductive issues in a cow-calf operation during Cattlemen’s Day, Jan. 26, 2011, at the Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory in Whitman, NE.

“The primary goal in any cow-calf operation is to get a high number of cows pregnant in a timely manner,” Randle told the crowd of nearly 100 producers. If producers are starting to see too many open cows, late calving cows, and a strung out breeding season, without an explanation, they may need to study their breeding program more closely to determine the cause.

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