Rockin’ Rural Women celebrate agriculture, family values | TSLN.com

Rockin’ Rural Women celebrate agriculture, family values

Women in agriculture are often the unsung champions on a working ranch – handling everything from working cattle, making food, doing laundry, helping kids with homework, fixing fence and other day-to-day tasks on the operation. Often living in remote areas, today’s farm women tend to have little time to go shopping, meet with friends or enjoy “me” time.

The ability to connect with like-minded women is often a much-needed morale booster for these unsung heroes in agriculture, and, now, modern technology is making those connections a whole lot simpler.

Rockin’ Rural Women is a group dedicated to the amazing females in today’s agriculture industry. The Facebook and Twitter group was founded in October 2011 by a group of women who are passionate, hard-working individuals in the business, including: Crystal Young, Iowa; Brooke Clay, Oklahoma; Jodi Termine, Kansas; Celeste Settrini, Colleen Cecil and Sharlene Garcia, California; Leah Beyer, Indiana; Kelly Rivard, Illinois; and Kirsti Craig, Val Wagner, Sarah Wilson and Katie Lukens Pinke, all from North Dakota.

Pinke was the brainchild behind it all and talked about the goals of Rockin’ Rural Women and the hopes she has for the organization.

“I reached out to friends to start Rockin’ Rural Women, and the purpose is to create a virtual community where women can connect with other women whether they are rural or urban,” said Pinke. “A majority of the world may live in cities, but they have a passion for rural, a history of rural or maybe it is in their dreams to live rural one day.”

Facebook and Twitter offers a way to make connections.

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“You and I live and work in agriculture, but I saw an opportunity, as did others, to create a movement in order to connect with women who are rural and city women who love rural life but don’t feel connected to agriculture,” she explained. “There are different passions like gardening, fashion, photography, do-it-yourself projects, sewing and many, many other hobbies that we connect on, plus we love wide-open spaces and want to create empowered women to speak out for rural life.”

The group has hosted two online chat sessions, where women receive door prizes for answering questions on family values, traditions, hobbies and why they love rural America. The next Rockin’ Rural Women chat will be held Nov. 14 at 9 p.m. CST. The topic will be “Food Thanks,” and the conversation will be about being thankful, celebrating the holiday season, giving to others, buying local, spending time with family and favorite recipes for this time of year.

“Ultimately, Rockin’ Rural Women benefits families, farming and where our food comes from, which are three of my deepest passions and where I connect most often in social media,” Pinke said. “Rockin’ Rural Women is a bit of a stepping out for me and others. If there is one goal, it’s that I want more women to engage and be empowered to connect and share their voice. This group celebrates a wide range of women, geographies, interests and ages!”

One goal of the group is to grow and expand in numbers, and one day, host a conference specifically geared toward women, both urban and rural, who have a passion for American agriculture. To get involved, women can follow #RockinRuralWomen on Twitter and “Like” the Facebook page.

“Soon, we’ll have a landing page to list out blog rolls and help the women connect offline, hopefully in a series of events or an annual event for any woman that loves rural America,” Pinke said.

Join in on the next online conversation to make connections with women who have similar passions, interests and hobbies. For many farm women, this is a much-needed break away from ranch and family obligations, a chance to renew their spirits, make friends and enjoy some “me” time.

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