Rocky Mountain Supply meeting provides tips on beef nutrition, vaccination procedures | TSLN.com

Rocky Mountain Supply meeting provides tips on beef nutrition, vaccination procedures

Bill Brewster

Photo by Bill BrewsterRocky Mountain Supply participants, from left, Dave Miller, CHS, Inc.; Scott Aberg, SmartLic; Tess White, Alltech; Dr. J.P. Pollreisz, Pfizer Animal Health, and Nick Campbell, Pfizer Animal Health, participated in recent educational meetings in Southwestern Montana.

Producers in southwestern Montana received timely information on fall nutrition and vaccination procedures during recent educational programs in Belgrade, Townsend and Dillon.

The programs were sponsored by Rocky Mountain Supply. The cooperative reaches out to over 15,000 share holders in a 10-county service area with feed, fertilizer, clothing, hardware, animal health products and tack.

The fall educational programs were attended by several hundred producers, where speakers emphasized the need to start cattle health protocol with proper nutrition for sustained herd production and health.

“Put your money first into nutrition,” suggested Dr. J.P. Pollreisz, DVM, the manager of Feedlot Veterinary Services for the Pfizer Animal Health Group. “Without the proper nutrition to start with many vaccines just aren’t effective.”

Pollreisz said the health prevention goal for producers should be to intervene in the marketing/production channel with management, health and nutritional procedures to minimize health problems and maximize performance.

“The majority of losses due to health from weaning to harvest are due to Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex or BRD,” he said. BRD progresses with predisposing factors like stressors, environmental/ management factors and viral infections.

Recommended Stories For You

The primary BRD pathogen is Mannheimia haemolytica. It is the number-one end-stage killer with more research and development dedicated to this bacteria than all of the others combined. Pollreisz said vaccination at the ranch is most effective before stress or transportation.

After that, opportunistic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Actinobacillus pyogenes move into the animal’s system. To fight the complex, he said an integrated prevention/solution approach is needed. Focusing on single factors is the most common cause of failure.

He warned that there are endotoxin reactions across cattle populations to some of the vaccines.

“On the cow-calf level,” Pollreisz said, “sound programs combine management, vaccination and nutrition. Management focuses on minimizing stress and disease challenges.” Vaccination should provide rapid, solid protection against the key players in BRD and nutrition should consist of a palatable source of energy, protein, vitamins and minerals and the control of coccidiosis, he said. Predisposing micronutrient deficiencies can contribute to the conditions.

A pre-shipment protocol of vaccination and possibly antibiotics can prepare the calf for subsequent feeding or grazing, he noted.

He warned that parasite infections can cause immunosuppression in a direct way by affecting the cells of the immune system, and indirectly by interfering with protein and mineral metabolism.

Calves, he said, are subject to both viral and bacterial infections. Viral infections are usually sourced by a carrier animal within the herd and use the host cell’s DNA to replicate. There is no direct treatment – vaccination and biosecurity are key.

Bacterial infections do not rely on host cells for replication and cause damage by cell destruction usually with toxins. Pollreisz said they spread through tissue on their own. In the case of BRD, he said most or all animals have the bacteria in their nose. They are treated with antibiotics, but prevention is best achieved with stress management and virus control first and bacterial vaccination second.

“Antibiotics do not cure cattle of infectious diseases, but stop or delay the progress of the infection and buy time until the animal’s own resistance and recovery mechanisms can take over,” he said.

When checking animals, Pollreisz said to look for depression, appetite reduction respiratory problems, temperature and stool changes.

If the disease is noted, he suggested that animal be pulled early to minimize lung damage while performance is salvageable and then treat aggressively.

Producers in southwestern Montana received timely information on fall nutrition and vaccination procedures during recent educational programs in Belgrade, Townsend and Dillon.

The programs were sponsored by Rocky Mountain Supply. The cooperative reaches out to over 15,000 share holders in a 10-county service area with feed, fertilizer, clothing, hardware, animal health products and tack.

The fall educational programs were attended by several hundred producers, where speakers emphasized the need to start cattle health protocol with proper nutrition for sustained herd production and health.

“Put your money first into nutrition,” suggested Dr. J.P. Pollreisz, DVM, the manager of Feedlot Veterinary Services for the Pfizer Animal Health Group. “Without the proper nutrition to start with many vaccines just aren’t effective.”

Pollreisz said the health prevention goal for producers should be to intervene in the marketing/production channel with management, health and nutritional procedures to minimize health problems and maximize performance.

“The majority of losses due to health from weaning to harvest are due to Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex or BRD,” he said. BRD progresses with predisposing factors like stressors, environmental/ management factors and viral infections.

The primary BRD pathogen is Mannheimia haemolytica. It is the number-one end-stage killer with more research and development dedicated to this bacteria than all of the others combined. Pollreisz said vaccination at the ranch is most effective before stress or transportation.

After that, opportunistic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Actinobacillus pyogenes move into the animal’s system. To fight the complex, he said an integrated prevention/solution approach is needed. Focusing on single factors is the most common cause of failure.

He warned that there are endotoxin reactions across cattle populations to some of the vaccines.

“On the cow-calf level,” Pollreisz said, “sound programs combine management, vaccination and nutrition. Management focuses on minimizing stress and disease challenges.” Vaccination should provide rapid, solid protection against the key players in BRD and nutrition should consist of a palatable source of energy, protein, vitamins and minerals and the control of coccidiosis, he said. Predisposing micronutrient deficiencies can contribute to the conditions.

A pre-shipment protocol of vaccination and possibly antibiotics can prepare the calf for subsequent feeding or grazing, he noted.

He warned that parasite infections can cause immunosuppression in a direct way by affecting the cells of the immune system, and indirectly by interfering with protein and mineral metabolism.

Calves, he said, are subject to both viral and bacterial infections. Viral infections are usually sourced by a carrier animal within the herd and use the host cell’s DNA to replicate. There is no direct treatment – vaccination and biosecurity are key.

Bacterial infections do not rely on host cells for replication and cause damage by cell destruction usually with toxins. Pollreisz said they spread through tissue on their own. In the case of BRD, he said most or all animals have the bacteria in their nose. They are treated with antibiotics, but prevention is best achieved with stress management and virus control first and bacterial vaccination second.

“Antibiotics do not cure cattle of infectious diseases, but stop or delay the progress of the infection and buy time until the animal’s own resistance and recovery mechanisms can take over,” he said.

When checking animals, Pollreisz said to look for depression, appetite reduction respiratory problems, temperature and stool changes.

If the disease is noted, he suggested that animal be pulled early to minimize lung damage while performance is salvageable and then treat aggressively.

Go back to article