Rodeo clowns reminisce at Heritage Center | TSLN.com

Rodeo clowns reminisce at Heritage Center

Photos by Jan Swan WoodA boy gets autographs from the clowns/bullfighters during the Rodeo Clown Reunion Campfire Series at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD July 22.

Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

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Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

Grease paint, baggy pants and laughter would describe the group that gathered at the High Plains Heritage Center in Spearfish, SD on the evening of July 22. The National Rodeo Clowns Reunion has gathered for the second time in the Black Hills and graced the stage in a Campfire Series at the Heritage Center.

The reunion group includes over 40 rodeo clowns from 14 states and is kept in line by Gail Woerner, author of “Fearless Funnymen: History of the Rodeo Clown.” She wrote the book and started the reunion to honor the clowns for all their years in the arena. She stated at the beginning of the program, “They see humor in things that most normal people won’t. Of course, they’re NOT normal!”

The campfire session consisted of the clowns/bullfighters being divided into three groups. Each group was asked a question and a microphone was passed from person to person so they could each have an opportunity to answer it. Each group was asked different questions so that it covered a broad range of information.

The first question was, “Why did you start?” Dixie Reger Mosely of Amarillo, TX, the only woman clown in the group, said that she was at an All Girl Rodeo in Wichita Falls, TX in 1941 and the clown hadn’t showed up. The man in charge asked who they could get and Dixie’s dad said, “Dixie’ll do it!”

“So I did,” says Mosely. “Whatever daddy said you’d do, you did it!”

Their makeup was the next question, and most of them said that they hadn’t changed it much over the years. Wayne Cornish of Enid, OK said, “I had an ol’ ugly face to start with, so thought it would help. I always wore my makeup the same.”

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