SDSU Extension announces restructuring | TSLN.com

SDSU Extension announces restructuring

The South Dakota State University College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences has announced the restructuring of the South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service in response to a 10-percent reduction in state appropriations for Fiscal Year 2012. In addition to a decrease of $818,644 in state appropriations, the agency is anticipating a reduction of $325,000 in federal budgets for a one-year total of $1.2 million. These cuts come in addition to state budget reductions of $400,000 in the past two years.

College officials announced details of the reorganization at a meeting Tuesday with all Extension staff.

Barry Dunn, dean of the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences, said the decision to restructure reflects recommendations received from an administrative advisory committee of Extension staff. Dunn appointed the committee to propose options in response to reduced budgets. In addition to the committee recommendations, the college has worked with citizens and organizations across the state to determine how Extension should reposition itself to serve future needs.

Since receiving the advisory committee recommendation to restructure, Dunn appointed five implementation committees to develop recommendations to guide the transition. The advisory committee and implementation committees included 36 Extension employees.

“Given the budget reductions, face-to-face delivery as the primary teaching method for Extension is no longer financially practical or socially required for most audiences,” Dunn said. “This restructuring will maintain our support for critical audiences. It strengthens our commitment to agriculture and communities, and it renews our commitment to 4-H, youth and families.”

The South Dakota State University College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences has announced the restructuring of the South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service in response to a 10-percent reduction in state appropriations for Fiscal Year 2012. In addition to a decrease of $818,644 in state appropriations, the agency is anticipating a reduction of $325,000 in federal budgets for a one-year total of $1.2 million. These cuts come in addition to state budget reductions of $400,000 in the past two years.

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College officials announced details of the reorganization at a meeting Tuesday with all Extension staff.

Barry Dunn, dean of the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences, said the decision to restructure reflects recommendations received from an administrative advisory committee of Extension staff. Dunn appointed the committee to propose options in response to reduced budgets. In addition to the committee recommendations, the college has worked with citizens and organizations across the state to determine how Extension should reposition itself to serve future needs.

Since receiving the advisory committee recommendation to restructure, Dunn appointed five implementation committees to develop recommendations to guide the transition. The advisory committee and implementation committees included 36 Extension employees.

“Given the budget reductions, face-to-face delivery as the primary teaching method for Extension is no longer financially practical or socially required for most audiences,” Dunn said. “This restructuring will maintain our support for critical audiences. It strengthens our commitment to agriculture and communities, and it renews our commitment to 4-H, youth and families.”

The South Dakota State University College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences has announced the restructuring of the South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service in response to a 10-percent reduction in state appropriations for Fiscal Year 2012. In addition to a decrease of $818,644 in state appropriations, the agency is anticipating a reduction of $325,000 in federal budgets for a one-year total of $1.2 million. These cuts come in addition to state budget reductions of $400,000 in the past two years.

College officials announced details of the reorganization at a meeting Tuesday with all Extension staff.

Barry Dunn, dean of the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences, said the decision to restructure reflects recommendations received from an administrative advisory committee of Extension staff. Dunn appointed the committee to propose options in response to reduced budgets. In addition to the committee recommendations, the college has worked with citizens and organizations across the state to determine how Extension should reposition itself to serve future needs.

Since receiving the advisory committee recommendation to restructure, Dunn appointed five implementation committees to develop recommendations to guide the transition. The advisory committee and implementation committees included 36 Extension employees.

“Given the budget reductions, face-to-face delivery as the primary teaching method for Extension is no longer financially practical or socially required for most audiences,” Dunn said. “This restructuring will maintain our support for critical audiences. It strengthens our commitment to agriculture and communities, and it renews our commitment to 4-H, youth and families.”

The South Dakota State University College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences has announced the restructuring of the South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service in response to a 10-percent reduction in state appropriations for Fiscal Year 2012. In addition to a decrease of $818,644 in state appropriations, the agency is anticipating a reduction of $325,000 in federal budgets for a one-year total of $1.2 million. These cuts come in addition to state budget reductions of $400,000 in the past two years.

College officials announced details of the reorganization at a meeting Tuesday with all Extension staff.

Barry Dunn, dean of the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences, said the decision to restructure reflects recommendations received from an administrative advisory committee of Extension staff. Dunn appointed the committee to propose options in response to reduced budgets. In addition to the committee recommendations, the college has worked with citizens and organizations across the state to determine how Extension should reposition itself to serve future needs.

Since receiving the advisory committee recommendation to restructure, Dunn appointed five implementation committees to develop recommendations to guide the transition. The advisory committee and implementation committees included 36 Extension employees.

“Given the budget reductions, face-to-face delivery as the primary teaching method for Extension is no longer financially practical or socially required for most audiences,” Dunn said. “This restructuring will maintain our support for critical audiences. It strengthens our commitment to agriculture and communities, and it renews our commitment to 4-H, youth and families.”

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