Senate passes 2012 ag appropriations bill without riders prohibiting humane horse processing | TSLN.com

Senate passes 2012 ag appropriations bill without riders prohibiting humane horse processing

On Nov. 1, the U.S. Senate passed HR 2122 – the FY 2012 agriculture appropriations bill without any of the annual riders which have prevented USDA from providing necessary inspection to horse processing facilities. Now the bill moves to a conference committee to reconcile the differences between the pro-horse industry Senate version of the bill, and the House bill which includes annual riders that prohibit USDA from providing inspection to ensure humane handling and food safety in horse meat production.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), a radical animal rights organization, and their many offshoots who actively work to end animal agriculture, use misleading emotional propaganda to betray an animal loving American public. These groups were successful in closing down the last three horse processing facilities in Texas and Illinois in 2007 through state action in those two states. In the same time period they were able to convince Congress to attach amendments to the ag appropriations bill that have prevented any facility to open in any other state. These amendments have been included every year since then.

“That back door strategy duped Congress,” said United Horsemen President Dave Duquette, “and denied the horse industry any opportunity through a regular legislative process with full hearings and industry input to provide the common sense information that could have prevented the horrific and totally preventable unintended consequences.” Duquette went on to state that “hopefully the conference committee will end this counter-productive policy that decreases the welfare of horses, and unfairly destroys an entire sector of animal agriculture.”

As documented in a Government Accountability Office (GAO) study published earlier this year on “Horse Welfare: Action Needed to Address Unintended Consequences of the Cessation of Domestic Slaughter,” loss of an option for humane processing has doomed thousands of horses to a needless and wasteful death of suffering and starvation; has condemned thousands more to endure long and arduous transportation to processing in Canada and Mexico where the U.S. has no jurisdiction and cannot ensure it is done humanely; all at the same time that every horse rescue in the country is full and overwhelmed; and the broader horse industry is deeply impacted by the loss of value and no market for otherwise unusable, unwanted horses.

“We are grateful that the Senate took the initiative to order a thorough look at the effects on horse welfare and on horse economy,” said United Horsemen Vice President and Wyoming State Representative Sue Wallis, “and even more appreciative that they passed the bill today without these damaging amendments.”

“With Congress’ help we can build a better future for horses and for horse people. By restoring humane and regulated horse processing we can improve the overall welfare of horses, rebuild the once vibrant and viable equine economy, create jobs, return value and property rights to hardworking, taxpaying horse owning families and businesses, preserve our beloved horseback American culture, enhance hard-hit state and tribal rural economies, and protect animal agriculture from further transgressions by a very dangerous animal rights vegan agenda.”

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On Nov. 1, the U.S. Senate passed HR 2122 – the FY 2012 agriculture appropriations bill without any of the annual riders which have prevented USDA from providing necessary inspection to horse processing facilities. Now the bill moves to a conference committee to reconcile the differences between the pro-horse industry Senate version of the bill, and the House bill which includes annual riders that prohibit USDA from providing inspection to ensure humane handling and food safety in horse meat production.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), a radical animal rights organization, and their many offshoots who actively work to end animal agriculture, use misleading emotional propaganda to betray an animal loving American public. These groups were successful in closing down the last three horse processing facilities in Texas and Illinois in 2007 through state action in those two states. In the same time period they were able to convince Congress to attach amendments to the ag appropriations bill that have prevented any facility to open in any other state. These amendments have been included every year since then.

“That back door strategy duped Congress,” said United Horsemen President Dave Duquette, “and denied the horse industry any opportunity through a regular legislative process with full hearings and industry input to provide the common sense information that could have prevented the horrific and totally preventable unintended consequences.” Duquette went on to state that “hopefully the conference committee will end this counter-productive policy that decreases the welfare of horses, and unfairly destroys an entire sector of animal agriculture.”

As documented in a Government Accountability Office (GAO) study published earlier this year on “Horse Welfare: Action Needed to Address Unintended Consequences of the Cessation of Domestic Slaughter,” loss of an option for humane processing has doomed thousands of horses to a needless and wasteful death of suffering and starvation; has condemned thousands more to endure long and arduous transportation to processing in Canada and Mexico where the U.S. has no jurisdiction and cannot ensure it is done humanely; all at the same time that every horse rescue in the country is full and overwhelmed; and the broader horse industry is deeply impacted by the loss of value and no market for otherwise unusable, unwanted horses.

“We are grateful that the Senate took the initiative to order a thorough look at the effects on horse welfare and on horse economy,” said United Horsemen Vice President and Wyoming State Representative Sue Wallis, “and even more appreciative that they passed the bill today without these damaging amendments.”

“With Congress’ help we can build a better future for horses and for horse people. By restoring humane and regulated horse processing we can improve the overall welfare of horses, rebuild the once vibrant and viable equine economy, create jobs, return value and property rights to hardworking, taxpaying horse owning families and businesses, preserve our beloved horseback American culture, enhance hard-hit state and tribal rural economies, and protect animal agriculture from further transgressions by a very dangerous animal rights vegan agenda.”

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