Silver state hosts silver anniversary of National Cowboy Poetry Gathering | TSLN.com

Silver state hosts silver anniversary of National Cowboy Poetry Gathering

Jeri L. Dobrowski

January 2009

Back in 1985, Elko, Nevada played host to a little get-together. Meant to be a one-time event, the gathering brought together practitioners of the obscure folk art of cowboy poetry. They came from cow country, got together, got acquainted. They shared poems, shared phone numbers, and headed back from whence they had come – back to raising beef cattle.

Charlie Seemann, executive director of the Western Folklife Center, which produces the gathering, says: “They all had too much fun, the press loved it, and they said, ‘Let’s do it again next year.’ Frankly, I think everybody’s a little surprised at the longevity of it and the fact that it just seems to keep getting a little bigger.”

Fifteen poets who participated in that first gathering are among more than 130 artists who are heading to Elko for the 25th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering (NCPG). An eight-day event – January 24-31, 2009 – the gathering also features cowboy and western music, prose, storytelling, films and visual arts, workshops, lectures, dancing, regional foods, and traditional cowboy crafts. The events-a-plenty, silver-anniversary edition of the NCPG offers performances on seven simultaneous stages around Elko.

In the past, I’ve noted those artists who hailed from the Tri-State Livestock News coverage area. In honor of this year’s milestone, I’m including all of the official 2009 poets, musicians and musical groups. (As an added bonus, the Western Folklife Center has added an audio clip along with the biography and photo of each performer. These full-length clips provide a next-best-thing glimpse of the gathering – without having to stop for gas every 400 miles or pass through airport security: http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/index.php/2009-NP-Performers/):

Adrian Brannan (CA), Oscar Auker (TX), Baxter Black (AZ), Dave Bourne (CA), Jerry Brooks (UT), The Burson Family (TX), Jon Chandler and the Wichitones (CO), Bimbo Cheney (NV), Bob Christensen (WA), E.T. Collinsworth (NM), Cowboy Celtic (CAN), Rick “Sourdough Slim” Crowder (CA);

Doris Daley (CAN), Jay Dalton (NV), Duane Dickinson (MT), John Dofflemyer (CA), Carolyn Dufurrena (NV), Elizabeth Ebert (SD), Don Edwards (TX), Leon Flick (OR), Dick Gibford (CA), Janice Gilbertson (CA), The Gillette Brothers (TX), Peggy Godfrey (CO), Skip Gorman (NH) & Connie Dover (WY), DW Groethe (MT);

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R.W. Hampton (NM), Linda Hasselstrom (SD), Andy Hedges (TX), Don Hedgpeth (TX), Yvonne Hollenbeck (SD), Hot Club of Cowtown (TX), Jess Howard (ND), Yula Sue Hunting (UT), Linda Hussa (CA), Chris Isaacs (AZ), Teresa Jordan (UT), Echo Klaproth (WY), Ross Knox (AZ);

Walt LaRue (CA), Ray Lashley (CO), Bill Lowman (ND), Corb Lund (CAN), Rusty McCall (NM), Betty Lynne McCarthy (MO), Wallace McRae (MT), Lyn Messersmith (NE), Waddie Mitchell (NV), Clark Morris (OR), Michael Martin Murphey (NM), Joel Nelson (TX), Rodney Nelson (ND), Kay Kelley Nowell (TX);

Glenn Ohrlin (AR), Gwen Petersen (MT), The Quebe Sisters Band (TX), Vess Quinlan (CO), Henry Real Bird (MT), Duane Reece (AZ), Pat Richardson (CA), Riders In The Sky (TN), Randy Rieman (MT), Tom Russell (TX);

Chris “Sandman” Sand (ND), Bob Schild (ID), Georgie Sicking (WY), Jesse Smith (WY), Dave Stamey (CA), Gail Steiger (AZ), Kent Stockton (WY), Milton Taylor (AUS), Ian Tyson (CAN), Jack Walther (NV), Bill Wood (SD), Wylie & The Wild West (WA), and Paul Zarzyski (MT).

By and large, the performers live in rural locations across the West; a handful make their home east of the Mississippi River. However, more than 40 percent of those who make the trek to the NCPG travel from urban areas.

“People want to hear something authentic, from the heart and rooted in the land,” explains Hal Cannon, founding director of the Western Folklife Center. “When we started in 1985, there was an energy that came out of cattle country, that took hold of talented and creative men and women from every generation, and brought a representative group together for the first time in Elko to express their art. The response was greater than anything we could have imagined; and it’s stronger than ever today. People are writing and sharing poetry who might never have dared before. Had it not been for the gathering, this creative energy from ranchers and cowboys may have never found voice.”

The Western Folklife Center’s Website (http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/) is extensive. I encourage you to investigate it for yourself. Don’t miss these highlights:

Back in 1985, Elko, Nevada played host to a little get-together. Meant to be a one-time event, the gathering brought together practitioners of the obscure folk art of cowboy poetry. They came from cow country, got together, got acquainted. They shared poems, shared phone numbers, and headed back from whence they had come – back to raising beef cattle.

Charlie Seemann, executive director of the Western Folklife Center, which produces the gathering, says: “They all had too much fun, the press loved it, and they said, ‘Let’s do it again next year.’ Frankly, I think everybody’s a little surprised at the longevity of it and the fact that it just seems to keep getting a little bigger.”

Fifteen poets who participated in that first gathering are among more than 130 artists who are heading to Elko for the 25th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering (NCPG). An eight-day event – January 24-31, 2009 – the gathering also features cowboy and western music, prose, storytelling, films and visual arts, workshops, lectures, dancing, regional foods, and traditional cowboy crafts. The events-a-plenty, silver-anniversary edition of the NCPG offers performances on seven simultaneous stages around Elko.

In the past, I’ve noted those artists who hailed from the Tri-State Livestock News coverage area. In honor of this year’s milestone, I’m including all of the official 2009 poets, musicians and musical groups. (As an added bonus, the Western Folklife Center has added an audio clip along with the biography and photo of each performer. These full-length clips provide a next-best-thing glimpse of the gathering – without having to stop for gas every 400 miles or pass through airport security: http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/index.php/2009-NP-Performers/):

Adrian Brannan (CA), Oscar Auker (TX), Baxter Black (AZ), Dave Bourne (CA), Jerry Brooks (UT), The Burson Family (TX), Jon Chandler and the Wichitones (CO), Bimbo Cheney (NV), Bob Christensen (WA), E.T. Collinsworth (NM), Cowboy Celtic (CAN), Rick “Sourdough Slim” Crowder (CA);

Doris Daley (CAN), Jay Dalton (NV), Duane Dickinson (MT), John Dofflemyer (CA), Carolyn Dufurrena (NV), Elizabeth Ebert (SD), Don Edwards (TX), Leon Flick (OR), Dick Gibford (CA), Janice Gilbertson (CA), The Gillette Brothers (TX), Peggy Godfrey (CO), Skip Gorman (NH) & Connie Dover (WY), DW Groethe (MT);

R.W. Hampton (NM), Linda Hasselstrom (SD), Andy Hedges (TX), Don Hedgpeth (TX), Yvonne Hollenbeck (SD), Hot Club of Cowtown (TX), Jess Howard (ND), Yula Sue Hunting (UT), Linda Hussa (CA), Chris Isaacs (AZ), Teresa Jordan (UT), Echo Klaproth (WY), Ross Knox (AZ);

Walt LaRue (CA), Ray Lashley (CO), Bill Lowman (ND), Corb Lund (CAN), Rusty McCall (NM), Betty Lynne McCarthy (MO), Wallace McRae (MT), Lyn Messersmith (NE), Waddie Mitchell (NV), Clark Morris (OR), Michael Martin Murphey (NM), Joel Nelson (TX), Rodney Nelson (ND), Kay Kelley Nowell (TX);

Glenn Ohrlin (AR), Gwen Petersen (MT), The Quebe Sisters Band (TX), Vess Quinlan (CO), Henry Real Bird (MT), Duane Reece (AZ), Pat Richardson (CA), Riders In The Sky (TN), Randy Rieman (MT), Tom Russell (TX);

Chris “Sandman” Sand (ND), Bob Schild (ID), Georgie Sicking (WY), Jesse Smith (WY), Dave Stamey (CA), Gail Steiger (AZ), Kent Stockton (WY), Milton Taylor (AUS), Ian Tyson (CAN), Jack Walther (NV), Bill Wood (SD), Wylie & The Wild West (WA), and Paul Zarzyski (MT).

By and large, the performers live in rural locations across the West; a handful make their home east of the Mississippi River. However, more than 40 percent of those who make the trek to the NCPG travel from urban areas.

“People want to hear something authentic, from the heart and rooted in the land,” explains Hal Cannon, founding director of the Western Folklife Center. “When we started in 1985, there was an energy that came out of cattle country, that took hold of talented and creative men and women from every generation, and brought a representative group together for the first time in Elko to express their art. The response was greater than anything we could have imagined; and it’s stronger than ever today. People are writing and sharing poetry who might never have dared before. Had it not been for the gathering, this creative energy from ranchers and cowboys may have never found voice.”

The Western Folklife Center’s Website (http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/) is extensive. I encourage you to investigate it for yourself. Don’t miss these highlights:

Back in 1985, Elko, Nevada played host to a little get-together. Meant to be a one-time event, the gathering brought together practitioners of the obscure folk art of cowboy poetry. They came from cow country, got together, got acquainted. They shared poems, shared phone numbers, and headed back from whence they had come – back to raising beef cattle.

Charlie Seemann, executive director of the Western Folklife Center, which produces the gathering, says: “They all had too much fun, the press loved it, and they said, ‘Let’s do it again next year.’ Frankly, I think everybody’s a little surprised at the longevity of it and the fact that it just seems to keep getting a little bigger.”

Fifteen poets who participated in that first gathering are among more than 130 artists who are heading to Elko for the 25th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering (NCPG). An eight-day event – January 24-31, 2009 – the gathering also features cowboy and western music, prose, storytelling, films and visual arts, workshops, lectures, dancing, regional foods, and traditional cowboy crafts. The events-a-plenty, silver-anniversary edition of the NCPG offers performances on seven simultaneous stages around Elko.

In the past, I’ve noted those artists who hailed from the Tri-State Livestock News coverage area. In honor of this year’s milestone, I’m including all of the official 2009 poets, musicians and musical groups. (As an added bonus, the Western Folklife Center has added an audio clip along with the biography and photo of each performer. These full-length clips provide a next-best-thing glimpse of the gathering – without having to stop for gas every 400 miles or pass through airport security: http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/index.php/2009-NP-Performers/):

Adrian Brannan (CA), Oscar Auker (TX), Baxter Black (AZ), Dave Bourne (CA), Jerry Brooks (UT), The Burson Family (TX), Jon Chandler and the Wichitones (CO), Bimbo Cheney (NV), Bob Christensen (WA), E.T. Collinsworth (NM), Cowboy Celtic (CAN), Rick “Sourdough Slim” Crowder (CA);

Doris Daley (CAN), Jay Dalton (NV), Duane Dickinson (MT), John Dofflemyer (CA), Carolyn Dufurrena (NV), Elizabeth Ebert (SD), Don Edwards (TX), Leon Flick (OR), Dick Gibford (CA), Janice Gilbertson (CA), The Gillette Brothers (TX), Peggy Godfrey (CO), Skip Gorman (NH) & Connie Dover (WY), DW Groethe (MT);

R.W. Hampton (NM), Linda Hasselstrom (SD), Andy Hedges (TX), Don Hedgpeth (TX), Yvonne Hollenbeck (SD), Hot Club of Cowtown (TX), Jess Howard (ND), Yula Sue Hunting (UT), Linda Hussa (CA), Chris Isaacs (AZ), Teresa Jordan (UT), Echo Klaproth (WY), Ross Knox (AZ);

Walt LaRue (CA), Ray Lashley (CO), Bill Lowman (ND), Corb Lund (CAN), Rusty McCall (NM), Betty Lynne McCarthy (MO), Wallace McRae (MT), Lyn Messersmith (NE), Waddie Mitchell (NV), Clark Morris (OR), Michael Martin Murphey (NM), Joel Nelson (TX), Rodney Nelson (ND), Kay Kelley Nowell (TX);

Glenn Ohrlin (AR), Gwen Petersen (MT), The Quebe Sisters Band (TX), Vess Quinlan (CO), Henry Real Bird (MT), Duane Reece (AZ), Pat Richardson (CA), Riders In The Sky (TN), Randy Rieman (MT), Tom Russell (TX);

Chris “Sandman” Sand (ND), Bob Schild (ID), Georgie Sicking (WY), Jesse Smith (WY), Dave Stamey (CA), Gail Steiger (AZ), Kent Stockton (WY), Milton Taylor (AUS), Ian Tyson (CAN), Jack Walther (NV), Bill Wood (SD), Wylie & The Wild West (WA), and Paul Zarzyski (MT).

By and large, the performers live in rural locations across the West; a handful make their home east of the Mississippi River. However, more than 40 percent of those who make the trek to the NCPG travel from urban areas.

“People want to hear something authentic, from the heart and rooted in the land,” explains Hal Cannon, founding director of the Western Folklife Center. “When we started in 1985, there was an energy that came out of cattle country, that took hold of talented and creative men and women from every generation, and brought a representative group together for the first time in Elko to express their art. The response was greater than anything we could have imagined; and it’s stronger than ever today. People are writing and sharing poetry who might never have dared before. Had it not been for the gathering, this creative energy from ranchers and cowboys may have never found voice.”

The Western Folklife Center’s Website (http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/) is extensive. I encourage you to investigate it for yourself. Don’t miss these highlights:

Back in 1985, Elko, Nevada played host to a little get-together. Meant to be a one-time event, the gathering brought together practitioners of the obscure folk art of cowboy poetry. They came from cow country, got together, got acquainted. They shared poems, shared phone numbers, and headed back from whence they had come – back to raising beef cattle.

Charlie Seemann, executive director of the Western Folklife Center, which produces the gathering, says: “They all had too much fun, the press loved it, and they said, ‘Let’s do it again next year.’ Frankly, I think everybody’s a little surprised at the longevity of it and the fact that it just seems to keep getting a little bigger.”

Fifteen poets who participated in that first gathering are among more than 130 artists who are heading to Elko for the 25th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering (NCPG). An eight-day event – January 24-31, 2009 – the gathering also features cowboy and western music, prose, storytelling, films and visual arts, workshops, lectures, dancing, regional foods, and traditional cowboy crafts. The events-a-plenty, silver-anniversary edition of the NCPG offers performances on seven simultaneous stages around Elko.

In the past, I’ve noted those artists who hailed from the Tri-State Livestock News coverage area. In honor of this year’s milestone, I’m including all of the official 2009 poets, musicians and musical groups. (As an added bonus, the Western Folklife Center has added an audio clip along with the biography and photo of each performer. These full-length clips provide a next-best-thing glimpse of the gathering – without having to stop for gas every 400 miles or pass through airport security: http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/index.php/2009-NP-Performers/):

Adrian Brannan (CA), Oscar Auker (TX), Baxter Black (AZ), Dave Bourne (CA), Jerry Brooks (UT), The Burson Family (TX), Jon Chandler and the Wichitones (CO), Bimbo Cheney (NV), Bob Christensen (WA), E.T. Collinsworth (NM), Cowboy Celtic (CAN), Rick “Sourdough Slim” Crowder (CA);

Doris Daley (CAN), Jay Dalton (NV), Duane Dickinson (MT), John Dofflemyer (CA), Carolyn Dufurrena (NV), Elizabeth Ebert (SD), Don Edwards (TX), Leon Flick (OR), Dick Gibford (CA), Janice Gilbertson (CA), The Gillette Brothers (TX), Peggy Godfrey (CO), Skip Gorman (NH) & Connie Dover (WY), DW Groethe (MT);

R.W. Hampton (NM), Linda Hasselstrom (SD), Andy Hedges (TX), Don Hedgpeth (TX), Yvonne Hollenbeck (SD), Hot Club of Cowtown (TX), Jess Howard (ND), Yula Sue Hunting (UT), Linda Hussa (CA), Chris Isaacs (AZ), Teresa Jordan (UT), Echo Klaproth (WY), Ross Knox (AZ);

Walt LaRue (CA), Ray Lashley (CO), Bill Lowman (ND), Corb Lund (CAN), Rusty McCall (NM), Betty Lynne McCarthy (MO), Wallace McRae (MT), Lyn Messersmith (NE), Waddie Mitchell (NV), Clark Morris (OR), Michael Martin Murphey (NM), Joel Nelson (TX), Rodney Nelson (ND), Kay Kelley Nowell (TX);

Glenn Ohrlin (AR), Gwen Petersen (MT), The Quebe Sisters Band (TX), Vess Quinlan (CO), Henry Real Bird (MT), Duane Reece (AZ), Pat Richardson (CA), Riders In The Sky (TN), Randy Rieman (MT), Tom Russell (TX);

Chris “Sandman” Sand (ND), Bob Schild (ID), Georgie Sicking (WY), Jesse Smith (WY), Dave Stamey (CA), Gail Steiger (AZ), Kent Stockton (WY), Milton Taylor (AUS), Ian Tyson (CAN), Jack Walther (NV), Bill Wood (SD), Wylie & The Wild West (WA), and Paul Zarzyski (MT).

By and large, the performers live in rural locations across the West; a handful make their home east of the Mississippi River. However, more than 40 percent of those who make the trek to the NCPG travel from urban areas.

“People want to hear something authentic, from the heart and rooted in the land,” explains Hal Cannon, founding director of the Western Folklife Center. “When we started in 1985, there was an energy that came out of cattle country, that took hold of talented and creative men and women from every generation, and brought a representative group together for the first time in Elko to express their art. The response was greater than anything we could have imagined; and it’s stronger than ever today. People are writing and sharing poetry who might never have dared before. Had it not been for the gathering, this creative energy from ranchers and cowboys may have never found voice.”

The Western Folklife Center’s Website (http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/) is extensive. I encourage you to investigate it for yourself. Don’t miss these highlights:

Back in 1985, Elko, Nevada played host to a little get-together. Meant to be a one-time event, the gathering brought together practitioners of the obscure folk art of cowboy poetry. They came from cow country, got together, got acquainted. They shared poems, shared phone numbers, and headed back from whence they had come – back to raising beef cattle.

Charlie Seemann, executive director of the Western Folklife Center, which produces the gathering, says: “They all had too much fun, the press loved it, and they said, ‘Let’s do it again next year.’ Frankly, I think everybody’s a little surprised at the longevity of it and the fact that it just seems to keep getting a little bigger.”

Fifteen poets who participated in that first gathering are among more than 130 artists who are heading to Elko for the 25th annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering (NCPG). An eight-day event – January 24-31, 2009 – the gathering also features cowboy and western music, prose, storytelling, films and visual arts, workshops, lectures, dancing, regional foods, and traditional cowboy crafts. The events-a-plenty, silver-anniversary edition of the NCPG offers performances on seven simultaneous stages around Elko.

In the past, I’ve noted those artists who hailed from the Tri-State Livestock News coverage area. In honor of this year’s milestone, I’m including all of the official 2009 poets, musicians and musical groups. (As an added bonus, the Western Folklife Center has added an audio clip along with the biography and photo of each performer. These full-length clips provide a next-best-thing glimpse of the gathering – without having to stop for gas every 400 miles or pass through airport security: http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/index.php/2009-NP-Performers/):

Adrian Brannan (CA), Oscar Auker (TX), Baxter Black (AZ), Dave Bourne (CA), Jerry Brooks (UT), The Burson Family (TX), Jon Chandler and the Wichitones (CO), Bimbo Cheney (NV), Bob Christensen (WA), E.T. Collinsworth (NM), Cowboy Celtic (CAN), Rick “Sourdough Slim” Crowder (CA);

Doris Daley (CAN), Jay Dalton (NV), Duane Dickinson (MT), John Dofflemyer (CA), Carolyn Dufurrena (NV), Elizabeth Ebert (SD), Don Edwards (TX), Leon Flick (OR), Dick Gibford (CA), Janice Gilbertson (CA), The Gillette Brothers (TX), Peggy Godfrey (CO), Skip Gorman (NH) & Connie Dover (WY), DW Groethe (MT);

R.W. Hampton (NM), Linda Hasselstrom (SD), Andy Hedges (TX), Don Hedgpeth (TX), Yvonne Hollenbeck (SD), Hot Club of Cowtown (TX), Jess Howard (ND), Yula Sue Hunting (UT), Linda Hussa (CA), Chris Isaacs (AZ), Teresa Jordan (UT), Echo Klaproth (WY), Ross Knox (AZ);

Walt LaRue (CA), Ray Lashley (CO), Bill Lowman (ND), Corb Lund (CAN), Rusty McCall (NM), Betty Lynne McCarthy (MO), Wallace McRae (MT), Lyn Messersmith (NE), Waddie Mitchell (NV), Clark Morris (OR), Michael Martin Murphey (NM), Joel Nelson (TX), Rodney Nelson (ND), Kay Kelley Nowell (TX);

Glenn Ohrlin (AR), Gwen Petersen (MT), The Quebe Sisters Band (TX), Vess Quinlan (CO), Henry Real Bird (MT), Duane Reece (AZ), Pat Richardson (CA), Riders In The Sky (TN), Randy Rieman (MT), Tom Russell (TX);

Chris “Sandman” Sand (ND), Bob Schild (ID), Georgie Sicking (WY), Jesse Smith (WY), Dave Stamey (CA), Gail Steiger (AZ), Kent Stockton (WY), Milton Taylor (AUS), Ian Tyson (CAN), Jack Walther (NV), Bill Wood (SD), Wylie & The Wild West (WA), and Paul Zarzyski (MT).

By and large, the performers live in rural locations across the West; a handful make their home east of the Mississippi River. However, more than 40 percent of those who make the trek to the NCPG travel from urban areas.

“People want to hear something authentic, from the heart and rooted in the land,” explains Hal Cannon, founding director of the Western Folklife Center. “When we started in 1985, there was an energy that came out of cattle country, that took hold of talented and creative men and women from every generation, and brought a representative group together for the first time in Elko to express their art. The response was greater than anything we could have imagined; and it’s stronger than ever today. People are writing and sharing poetry who might never have dared before. Had it not been for the gathering, this creative energy from ranchers and cowboys may have never found voice.”

The Western Folklife Center’s Website (http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/) is extensive. I encourage you to investigate it for yourself. Don’t miss these highlights:

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