South Dakota farmers say CRP is a good option for marginal acres | TSLN.com

South Dakota farmers say CRP is a good option for marginal acres

BROOKINGS, SD – For many South Dakota farmers, the Conservation Reserve Program, (CRP) has become an integral part of their land management program – providing them with a cost-effective way to manage marginal farm ground.

“It’s a tool that farmers can use for their marginal land. Land that is difficult to farm due to water issues or is highly erodible,” said Rocco Murano, private lands habitat biologist for SD Game, Fish & Parks.

Murano says of the 19 million acres of cropland in South Dakota, currently 1.1 million acres are enrolled in CRP. Four-hundred and fifty of those acres are Gordon Heber’s.

Heber, 58, manages a 1,200-acre farm near Armour, SD; he raises corn, soybeans and hay. The fourth-generation farmer says he utilizes CRP to manage his marginal acres.

“My strategy is to put poor ground – ground with additional risks like flooding and saline soils – into CRP so that I can focus my energy and inputs on good ground, enabling me to produce more yields per acre,” said Heber, who first tried to enroll ground in the mid-90s but didn’t have ground accepted until the general sign-up in 1998.

This year he is hoping more of his acres are accepted in the 2010 general sign up – acres that were drowned out due to spring rains.

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“CRP is a great option for those prevented plant acres, and marginal acres that have caused issues for farmers over the last few years due to increased moisture,” said Jason Tronbak, conservation specialist for Millborn Seeds. “If a farmer isn’t able to get into their fields due to unfavorable conditions for a few years in a row, eventually the land won’t qualify for crop insurance.”

BROOKINGS, SD – For many South Dakota farmers, the Conservation Reserve Program, (CRP) has become an integral part of their land management program – providing them with a cost-effective way to manage marginal farm ground.

“It’s a tool that farmers can use for their marginal land. Land that is difficult to farm due to water issues or is highly erodible,” said Rocco Murano, private lands habitat biologist for SD Game, Fish & Parks.

Murano says of the 19 million acres of cropland in South Dakota, currently 1.1 million acres are enrolled in CRP. Four-hundred and fifty of those acres are Gordon Heber’s.

Heber, 58, manages a 1,200-acre farm near Armour, SD; he raises corn, soybeans and hay. The fourth-generation farmer says he utilizes CRP to manage his marginal acres.

“My strategy is to put poor ground – ground with additional risks like flooding and saline soils – into CRP so that I can focus my energy and inputs on good ground, enabling me to produce more yields per acre,” said Heber, who first tried to enroll ground in the mid-90s but didn’t have ground accepted until the general sign-up in 1998.

This year he is hoping more of his acres are accepted in the 2010 general sign up – acres that were drowned out due to spring rains.

“CRP is a great option for those prevented plant acres, and marginal acres that have caused issues for farmers over the last few years due to increased moisture,” said Jason Tronbak, conservation specialist for Millborn Seeds. “If a farmer isn’t able to get into their fields due to unfavorable conditions for a few years in a row, eventually the land won’t qualify for crop insurance.”

BROOKINGS, SD – For many South Dakota farmers, the Conservation Reserve Program, (CRP) has become an integral part of their land management program – providing them with a cost-effective way to manage marginal farm ground.

“It’s a tool that farmers can use for their marginal land. Land that is difficult to farm due to water issues or is highly erodible,” said Rocco Murano, private lands habitat biologist for SD Game, Fish & Parks.

Murano says of the 19 million acres of cropland in South Dakota, currently 1.1 million acres are enrolled in CRP. Four-hundred and fifty of those acres are Gordon Heber’s.

Heber, 58, manages a 1,200-acre farm near Armour, SD; he raises corn, soybeans and hay. The fourth-generation farmer says he utilizes CRP to manage his marginal acres.

“My strategy is to put poor ground – ground with additional risks like flooding and saline soils – into CRP so that I can focus my energy and inputs on good ground, enabling me to produce more yields per acre,” said Heber, who first tried to enroll ground in the mid-90s but didn’t have ground accepted until the general sign-up in 1998.

This year he is hoping more of his acres are accepted in the 2010 general sign up – acres that were drowned out due to spring rains.

“CRP is a great option for those prevented plant acres, and marginal acres that have caused issues for farmers over the last few years due to increased moisture,” said Jason Tronbak, conservation specialist for Millborn Seeds. “If a farmer isn’t able to get into their fields due to unfavorable conditions for a few years in a row, eventually the land won’t qualify for crop insurance.”

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