South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association 2011 annual meeting | TSLN.com

South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association 2011 annual meeting

Doug Hogan

The South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association (SDLAMA) held their 2011 Annual Meeting Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at the Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, SD. The meeting was well attended, with a powerful line-up of speakers.

Speaker Randy Buchholz, a loan officer for Heartland State Bank, began the meeting by discussing Livestock Risk Protection, a tool for producers to control risk by using livestock insurance. This can prove very beneficial for cow-calf operators, yearling buyers, backgrounding and finishing cattle. Martin E. Mortenson, Farm Service Agency (FSA) farm loan manager from Winner, SD. Mortenson talked about how FSA could help young producers to get started in agriculture. Mortenson reported that he’s had great success in establishing loans for new, young producers.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Dean of Agriculture and Biological Sciences Barry Dunn, spoke about growing rural South Dakota. To grow the South Dakota cattle industry, he said, there are five main points: increase cow numbers; increase backgrounding; build a packing plant; increase cattle feeding; and import more feeder cattle to be backgrounded or fed. Dunn said in order for this to happen, a shared vision needs to be established, in which he walked the crowd through his thought process:

A vision statement is a description of what the organization will look like after it successfully implements its strategies and achieves its full potential. Next conduct a SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is an organized method of evaluating the internal environment (strengths and weaknesses) and external environment (opportunities and threats) of the organization.

Dunn then went on to point out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the South Dakota cattle industry. Strengths, he said, included the quality of cattle; quality of people; strong transparent market; stable, positive cattle basis; and negative feed basis. The weaknesses he highlighted were: high grain prices; hard to get help; aging ranchers and farmers; weather/drought/floods; price of land; and distance from consumers. Opportunities he noted: backgrounding more cattle; young people who want to ranch and farm; possible packing plant; export markets; and the low U.S. cattle numbers. He concluded with an analysis of the threats to the South Dakota cattle industry: industry concentration; declining rural population; misinformed consumers; risk; and volatility in economy.

Secretary Walt Bones, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, also talked about growing rural South Dakota. He noted that in the state, there are more than 2,500 farm that have been in the same family for at least 100 years!

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Ron Frederick, South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) executive director, spoke to attendees next. Frederick reported the amount of money that the SDBIC receives and how they promote the beef industry. He also discussed how the business has changed, and gave a status of the checkoff division, while also providing a brief overview of history of the federation.

Next up was Dustin Oedekoven, DVM, state veterinarian, South Dakota Animal Industry Board, discussed the general health requirements for admission of animals into the state.

Concluding Oedekoven’s presentation, the South Dakota State Brand Board Director Larry Stearns reported on the numbers of stolen livestock and stated that random livestock checks have been successful.

Governor Dennis Daugaard was the noon speaker at the SDLAMA annual meeting. Daugaard highlighted the importance of the livestock auction markets in South Dakota, noting that they play a very vital role in every community. Daugaard said there are 32 livestock markets in South Dakota that bring jobs, economic growth, business to other local businesses and support local organizations and youth.

Daugaard went on to say that 98 percent of farms and ranches in South Dakota are family owned and operated and that the average age of the South Dakota farmer is 55.7 years. Each year one South Dakota producer raises enough food to feed 155 people in the U.S. and abroad. South Dakota’s agriculture industry has a $20.7 billion economic impact each year.

“With more that 19 million acres of cropland and 23 million acres of pasture land, our farmers and ranchers are one of our economy’s key drivers,” Daugaard said.

In addition to generating one-third of the state’s economic activity, agriculture and its associated industries employ more than 143,000 South Dakotans. This economic impact is a direct result of the state’s production capacity and investment in value-added industries. Businesses ranging from ethanol plants and livestock feeding operations to farmer’s markets and wineries capitalize on agriculture’s competitive and comparative advantages for economic development in South Dakota.

The South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association (SDLAMA) held their 2011 Annual Meeting Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at the Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, SD. The meeting was well attended, with a powerful line-up of speakers.

Speaker Randy Buchholz, a loan officer for Heartland State Bank, began the meeting by discussing Livestock Risk Protection, a tool for producers to control risk by using livestock insurance. This can prove very beneficial for cow-calf operators, yearling buyers, backgrounding and finishing cattle. Martin E. Mortenson, Farm Service Agency (FSA) farm loan manager from Winner, SD. Mortenson talked about how FSA could help young producers to get started in agriculture. Mortenson reported that he’s had great success in establishing loans for new, young producers.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Dean of Agriculture and Biological Sciences Barry Dunn, spoke about growing rural South Dakota. To grow the South Dakota cattle industry, he said, there are five main points: increase cow numbers; increase backgrounding; build a packing plant; increase cattle feeding; and import more feeder cattle to be backgrounded or fed. Dunn said in order for this to happen, a shared vision needs to be established, in which he walked the crowd through his thought process:

A vision statement is a description of what the organization will look like after it successfully implements its strategies and achieves its full potential. Next conduct a SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is an organized method of evaluating the internal environment (strengths and weaknesses) and external environment (opportunities and threats) of the organization.

Dunn then went on to point out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the South Dakota cattle industry. Strengths, he said, included the quality of cattle; quality of people; strong transparent market; stable, positive cattle basis; and negative feed basis. The weaknesses he highlighted were: high grain prices; hard to get help; aging ranchers and farmers; weather/drought/floods; price of land; and distance from consumers. Opportunities he noted: backgrounding more cattle; young people who want to ranch and farm; possible packing plant; export markets; and the low U.S. cattle numbers. He concluded with an analysis of the threats to the South Dakota cattle industry: industry concentration; declining rural population; misinformed consumers; risk; and volatility in economy.

Secretary Walt Bones, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, also talked about growing rural South Dakota. He noted that in the state, there are more than 2,500 farm that have been in the same family for at least 100 years!

Ron Frederick, South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) executive director, spoke to attendees next. Frederick reported the amount of money that the SDBIC receives and how they promote the beef industry. He also discussed how the business has changed, and gave a status of the checkoff division, while also providing a brief overview of history of the federation.

Next up was Dustin Oedekoven, DVM, state veterinarian, South Dakota Animal Industry Board, discussed the general health requirements for admission of animals into the state.

Concluding Oedekoven’s presentation, the South Dakota State Brand Board Director Larry Stearns reported on the numbers of stolen livestock and stated that random livestock checks have been successful.

Governor Dennis Daugaard was the noon speaker at the SDLAMA annual meeting. Daugaard highlighted the importance of the livestock auction markets in South Dakota, noting that they play a very vital role in every community. Daugaard said there are 32 livestock markets in South Dakota that bring jobs, economic growth, business to other local businesses and support local organizations and youth.

Daugaard went on to say that 98 percent of farms and ranches in South Dakota are family owned and operated and that the average age of the South Dakota farmer is 55.7 years. Each year one South Dakota producer raises enough food to feed 155 people in the U.S. and abroad. South Dakota’s agriculture industry has a $20.7 billion economic impact each year.

“With more that 19 million acres of cropland and 23 million acres of pasture land, our farmers and ranchers are one of our economy’s key drivers,” Daugaard said.

In addition to generating one-third of the state’s economic activity, agriculture and its associated industries employ more than 143,000 South Dakotans. This economic impact is a direct result of the state’s production capacity and investment in value-added industries. Businesses ranging from ethanol plants and livestock feeding operations to farmer’s markets and wineries capitalize on agriculture’s competitive and comparative advantages for economic development in South Dakota.

The South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association (SDLAMA) held their 2011 Annual Meeting Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at the Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, SD. The meeting was well attended, with a powerful line-up of speakers.

Speaker Randy Buchholz, a loan officer for Heartland State Bank, began the meeting by discussing Livestock Risk Protection, a tool for producers to control risk by using livestock insurance. This can prove very beneficial for cow-calf operators, yearling buyers, backgrounding and finishing cattle. Martin E. Mortenson, Farm Service Agency (FSA) farm loan manager from Winner, SD. Mortenson talked about how FSA could help young producers to get started in agriculture. Mortenson reported that he’s had great success in establishing loans for new, young producers.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Dean of Agriculture and Biological Sciences Barry Dunn, spoke about growing rural South Dakota. To grow the South Dakota cattle industry, he said, there are five main points: increase cow numbers; increase backgrounding; build a packing plant; increase cattle feeding; and import more feeder cattle to be backgrounded or fed. Dunn said in order for this to happen, a shared vision needs to be established, in which he walked the crowd through his thought process:

A vision statement is a description of what the organization will look like after it successfully implements its strategies and achieves its full potential. Next conduct a SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is an organized method of evaluating the internal environment (strengths and weaknesses) and external environment (opportunities and threats) of the organization.

Dunn then went on to point out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the South Dakota cattle industry. Strengths, he said, included the quality of cattle; quality of people; strong transparent market; stable, positive cattle basis; and negative feed basis. The weaknesses he highlighted were: high grain prices; hard to get help; aging ranchers and farmers; weather/drought/floods; price of land; and distance from consumers. Opportunities he noted: backgrounding more cattle; young people who want to ranch and farm; possible packing plant; export markets; and the low U.S. cattle numbers. He concluded with an analysis of the threats to the South Dakota cattle industry: industry concentration; declining rural population; misinformed consumers; risk; and volatility in economy.

Secretary Walt Bones, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, also talked about growing rural South Dakota. He noted that in the state, there are more than 2,500 farm that have been in the same family for at least 100 years!

Ron Frederick, South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) executive director, spoke to attendees next. Frederick reported the amount of money that the SDBIC receives and how they promote the beef industry. He also discussed how the business has changed, and gave a status of the checkoff division, while also providing a brief overview of history of the federation.

Next up was Dustin Oedekoven, DVM, state veterinarian, South Dakota Animal Industry Board, discussed the general health requirements for admission of animals into the state.

Concluding Oedekoven’s presentation, the South Dakota State Brand Board Director Larry Stearns reported on the numbers of stolen livestock and stated that random livestock checks have been successful.

Governor Dennis Daugaard was the noon speaker at the SDLAMA annual meeting. Daugaard highlighted the importance of the livestock auction markets in South Dakota, noting that they play a very vital role in every community. Daugaard said there are 32 livestock markets in South Dakota that bring jobs, economic growth, business to other local businesses and support local organizations and youth.

Daugaard went on to say that 98 percent of farms and ranches in South Dakota are family owned and operated and that the average age of the South Dakota farmer is 55.7 years. Each year one South Dakota producer raises enough food to feed 155 people in the U.S. and abroad. South Dakota’s agriculture industry has a $20.7 billion economic impact each year.

“With more that 19 million acres of cropland and 23 million acres of pasture land, our farmers and ranchers are one of our economy’s key drivers,” Daugaard said.

In addition to generating one-third of the state’s economic activity, agriculture and its associated industries employ more than 143,000 South Dakotans. This economic impact is a direct result of the state’s production capacity and investment in value-added industries. Businesses ranging from ethanol plants and livestock feeding operations to farmer’s markets and wineries capitalize on agriculture’s competitive and comparative advantages for economic development in South Dakota.

The South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association (SDLAMA) held their 2011 Annual Meeting Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at the Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, SD. The meeting was well attended, with a powerful line-up of speakers.

Speaker Randy Buchholz, a loan officer for Heartland State Bank, began the meeting by discussing Livestock Risk Protection, a tool for producers to control risk by using livestock insurance. This can prove very beneficial for cow-calf operators, yearling buyers, backgrounding and finishing cattle. Martin E. Mortenson, Farm Service Agency (FSA) farm loan manager from Winner, SD. Mortenson talked about how FSA could help young producers to get started in agriculture. Mortenson reported that he’s had great success in establishing loans for new, young producers.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Dean of Agriculture and Biological Sciences Barry Dunn, spoke about growing rural South Dakota. To grow the South Dakota cattle industry, he said, there are five main points: increase cow numbers; increase backgrounding; build a packing plant; increase cattle feeding; and import more feeder cattle to be backgrounded or fed. Dunn said in order for this to happen, a shared vision needs to be established, in which he walked the crowd through his thought process:

A vision statement is a description of what the organization will look like after it successfully implements its strategies and achieves its full potential. Next conduct a SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is an organized method of evaluating the internal environment (strengths and weaknesses) and external environment (opportunities and threats) of the organization.

Dunn then went on to point out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the South Dakota cattle industry. Strengths, he said, included the quality of cattle; quality of people; strong transparent market; stable, positive cattle basis; and negative feed basis. The weaknesses he highlighted were: high grain prices; hard to get help; aging ranchers and farmers; weather/drought/floods; price of land; and distance from consumers. Opportunities he noted: backgrounding more cattle; young people who want to ranch and farm; possible packing plant; export markets; and the low U.S. cattle numbers. He concluded with an analysis of the threats to the South Dakota cattle industry: industry concentration; declining rural population; misinformed consumers; risk; and volatility in economy.

Secretary Walt Bones, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, also talked about growing rural South Dakota. He noted that in the state, there are more than 2,500 farm that have been in the same family for at least 100 years!

Ron Frederick, South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) executive director, spoke to attendees next. Frederick reported the amount of money that the SDBIC receives and how they promote the beef industry. He also discussed how the business has changed, and gave a status of the checkoff division, while also providing a brief overview of history of the federation.

Next up was Dustin Oedekoven, DVM, state veterinarian, South Dakota Animal Industry Board, discussed the general health requirements for admission of animals into the state.

Concluding Oedekoven’s presentation, the South Dakota State Brand Board Director Larry Stearns reported on the numbers of stolen livestock and stated that random livestock checks have been successful.

Governor Dennis Daugaard was the noon speaker at the SDLAMA annual meeting. Daugaard highlighted the importance of the livestock auction markets in South Dakota, noting that they play a very vital role in every community. Daugaard said there are 32 livestock markets in South Dakota that bring jobs, economic growth, business to other local businesses and support local organizations and youth.

Daugaard went on to say that 98 percent of farms and ranches in South Dakota are family owned and operated and that the average age of the South Dakota farmer is 55.7 years. Each year one South Dakota producer raises enough food to feed 155 people in the U.S. and abroad. South Dakota’s agriculture industry has a $20.7 billion economic impact each year.

“With more that 19 million acres of cropland and 23 million acres of pasture land, our farmers and ranchers are one of our economy’s key drivers,” Daugaard said.

In addition to generating one-third of the state’s economic activity, agriculture and its associated industries employ more than 143,000 South Dakotans. This economic impact is a direct result of the state’s production capacity and investment in value-added industries. Businesses ranging from ethanol plants and livestock feeding operations to farmer’s markets and wineries capitalize on agriculture’s competitive and comparative advantages for economic development in South Dakota.

The South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association (SDLAMA) held their 2011 Annual Meeting Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at the Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, SD. The meeting was well attended, with a powerful line-up of speakers.

Speaker Randy Buchholz, a loan officer for Heartland State Bank, began the meeting by discussing Livestock Risk Protection, a tool for producers to control risk by using livestock insurance. This can prove very beneficial for cow-calf operators, yearling buyers, backgrounding and finishing cattle. Martin E. Mortenson, Farm Service Agency (FSA) farm loan manager from Winner, SD. Mortenson talked about how FSA could help young producers to get started in agriculture. Mortenson reported that he’s had great success in establishing loans for new, young producers.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Dean of Agriculture and Biological Sciences Barry Dunn, spoke about growing rural South Dakota. To grow the South Dakota cattle industry, he said, there are five main points: increase cow numbers; increase backgrounding; build a packing plant; increase cattle feeding; and import more feeder cattle to be backgrounded or fed. Dunn said in order for this to happen, a shared vision needs to be established, in which he walked the crowd through his thought process:

A vision statement is a description of what the organization will look like after it successfully implements its strategies and achieves its full potential. Next conduct a SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is an organized method of evaluating the internal environment (strengths and weaknesses) and external environment (opportunities and threats) of the organization.

Dunn then went on to point out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the South Dakota cattle industry. Strengths, he said, included the quality of cattle; quality of people; strong transparent market; stable, positive cattle basis; and negative feed basis. The weaknesses he highlighted were: high grain prices; hard to get help; aging ranchers and farmers; weather/drought/floods; price of land; and distance from consumers. Opportunities he noted: backgrounding more cattle; young people who want to ranch and farm; possible packing plant; export markets; and the low U.S. cattle numbers. He concluded with an analysis of the threats to the South Dakota cattle industry: industry concentration; declining rural population; misinformed consumers; risk; and volatility in economy.

Secretary Walt Bones, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, also talked about growing rural South Dakota. He noted that in the state, there are more than 2,500 farm that have been in the same family for at least 100 years!

Ron Frederick, South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) executive director, spoke to attendees next. Frederick reported the amount of money that the SDBIC receives and how they promote the beef industry. He also discussed how the business has changed, and gave a status of the checkoff division, while also providing a brief overview of history of the federation.

Next up was Dustin Oedekoven, DVM, state veterinarian, South Dakota Animal Industry Board, discussed the general health requirements for admission of animals into the state.

Concluding Oedekoven’s presentation, the South Dakota State Brand Board Director Larry Stearns reported on the numbers of stolen livestock and stated that random livestock checks have been successful.

Governor Dennis Daugaard was the noon speaker at the SDLAMA annual meeting. Daugaard highlighted the importance of the livestock auction markets in South Dakota, noting that they play a very vital role in every community. Daugaard said there are 32 livestock markets in South Dakota that bring jobs, economic growth, business to other local businesses and support local organizations and youth.

Daugaard went on to say that 98 percent of farms and ranches in South Dakota are family owned and operated and that the average age of the South Dakota farmer is 55.7 years. Each year one South Dakota producer raises enough food to feed 155 people in the U.S. and abroad. South Dakota’s agriculture industry has a $20.7 billion economic impact each year.

“With more that 19 million acres of cropland and 23 million acres of pasture land, our farmers and ranchers are one of our economy’s key drivers,” Daugaard said.

In addition to generating one-third of the state’s economic activity, agriculture and its associated industries employ more than 143,000 South Dakotans. This economic impact is a direct result of the state’s production capacity and investment in value-added industries. Businesses ranging from ethanol plants and livestock feeding operations to farmer’s markets and wineries capitalize on agriculture’s competitive and comparative advantages for economic development in South Dakota.

The South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association (SDLAMA) held their 2011 Annual Meeting Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at the Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, SD. The meeting was well attended, with a powerful line-up of speakers.

Speaker Randy Buchholz, a loan officer for Heartland State Bank, began the meeting by discussing Livestock Risk Protection, a tool for producers to control risk by using livestock insurance. This can prove very beneficial for cow-calf operators, yearling buyers, backgrounding and finishing cattle. Martin E. Mortenson, Farm Service Agency (FSA) farm loan manager from Winner, SD. Mortenson talked about how FSA could help young producers to get started in agriculture. Mortenson reported that he’s had great success in establishing loans for new, young producers.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Dean of Agriculture and Biological Sciences Barry Dunn, spoke about growing rural South Dakota. To grow the South Dakota cattle industry, he said, there are five main points: increase cow numbers; increase backgrounding; build a packing plant; increase cattle feeding; and import more feeder cattle to be backgrounded or fed. Dunn said in order for this to happen, a shared vision needs to be established, in which he walked the crowd through his thought process:

A vision statement is a description of what the organization will look like after it successfully implements its strategies and achieves its full potential. Next conduct a SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is an organized method of evaluating the internal environment (strengths and weaknesses) and external environment (opportunities and threats) of the organization.

Dunn then went on to point out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the South Dakota cattle industry. Strengths, he said, included the quality of cattle; quality of people; strong transparent market; stable, positive cattle basis; and negative feed basis. The weaknesses he highlighted were: high grain prices; hard to get help; aging ranchers and farmers; weather/drought/floods; price of land; and distance from consumers. Opportunities he noted: backgrounding more cattle; young people who want to ranch and farm; possible packing plant; export markets; and the low U.S. cattle numbers. He concluded with an analysis of the threats to the South Dakota cattle industry: industry concentration; declining rural population; misinformed consumers; risk; and volatility in economy.

Secretary Walt Bones, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, also talked about growing rural South Dakota. He noted that in the state, there are more than 2,500 farm that have been in the same family for at least 100 years!

Ron Frederick, South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) executive director, spoke to attendees next. Frederick reported the amount of money that the SDBIC receives and how they promote the beef industry. He also discussed how the business has changed, and gave a status of the checkoff division, while also providing a brief overview of history of the federation.

Next up was Dustin Oedekoven, DVM, state veterinarian, South Dakota Animal Industry Board, discussed the general health requirements for admission of animals into the state.

Concluding Oedekoven’s presentation, the South Dakota State Brand Board Director Larry Stearns reported on the numbers of stolen livestock and stated that random livestock checks have been successful.

Governor Dennis Daugaard was the noon speaker at the SDLAMA annual meeting. Daugaard highlighted the importance of the livestock auction markets in South Dakota, noting that they play a very vital role in every community. Daugaard said there are 32 livestock markets in South Dakota that bring jobs, economic growth, business to other local businesses and support local organizations and youth.

Daugaard went on to say that 98 percent of farms and ranches in South Dakota are family owned and operated and that the average age of the South Dakota farmer is 55.7 years. Each year one South Dakota producer raises enough food to feed 155 people in the U.S. and abroad. South Dakota’s agriculture industry has a $20.7 billion economic impact each year.

“With more that 19 million acres of cropland and 23 million acres of pasture land, our farmers and ranchers are one of our economy’s key drivers,” Daugaard said.

In addition to generating one-third of the state’s economic activity, agriculture and its associated industries employ more than 143,000 South Dakotans. This economic impact is a direct result of the state’s production capacity and investment in value-added industries. Businesses ranging from ethanol plants and livestock feeding operations to farmer’s markets and wineries capitalize on agriculture’s competitive and comparative advantages for economic development in South Dakota.

The South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association (SDLAMA) held their 2011 Annual Meeting Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at the Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, SD. The meeting was well attended, with a powerful line-up of speakers.

Speaker Randy Buchholz, a loan officer for Heartland State Bank, began the meeting by discussing Livestock Risk Protection, a tool for producers to control risk by using livestock insurance. This can prove very beneficial for cow-calf operators, yearling buyers, backgrounding and finishing cattle. Martin E. Mortenson, Farm Service Agency (FSA) farm loan manager from Winner, SD. Mortenson talked about how FSA could help young producers to get started in agriculture. Mortenson reported that he’s had great success in establishing loans for new, young producers.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Dean of Agriculture and Biological Sciences Barry Dunn, spoke about growing rural South Dakota. To grow the South Dakota cattle industry, he said, there are five main points: increase cow numbers; increase backgrounding; build a packing plant; increase cattle feeding; and import more feeder cattle to be backgrounded or fed. Dunn said in order for this to happen, a shared vision needs to be established, in which he walked the crowd through his thought process:

A vision statement is a description of what the organization will look like after it successfully implements its strategies and achieves its full potential. Next conduct a SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is an organized method of evaluating the internal environment (strengths and weaknesses) and external environment (opportunities and threats) of the organization.

Dunn then went on to point out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the South Dakota cattle industry. Strengths, he said, included the quality of cattle; quality of people; strong transparent market; stable, positive cattle basis; and negative feed basis. The weaknesses he highlighted were: high grain prices; hard to get help; aging ranchers and farmers; weather/drought/floods; price of land; and distance from consumers. Opportunities he noted: backgrounding more cattle; young people who want to ranch and farm; possible packing plant; export markets; and the low U.S. cattle numbers. He concluded with an analysis of the threats to the South Dakota cattle industry: industry concentration; declining rural population; misinformed consumers; risk; and volatility in economy.

Secretary Walt Bones, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, also talked about growing rural South Dakota. He noted that in the state, there are more than 2,500 farm that have been in the same family for at least 100 years!

Ron Frederick, South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) executive director, spoke to attendees next. Frederick reported the amount of money that the SDBIC receives and how they promote the beef industry. He also discussed how the business has changed, and gave a status of the checkoff division, while also providing a brief overview of history of the federation.

Next up was Dustin Oedekoven, DVM, state veterinarian, South Dakota Animal Industry Board, discussed the general health requirements for admission of animals into the state.

Concluding Oedekoven’s presentation, the South Dakota State Brand Board Director Larry Stearns reported on the numbers of stolen livestock and stated that random livestock checks have been successful.

Governor Dennis Daugaard was the noon speaker at the SDLAMA annual meeting. Daugaard highlighted the importance of the livestock auction markets in South Dakota, noting that they play a very vital role in every community. Daugaard said there are 32 livestock markets in South Dakota that bring jobs, economic growth, business to other local businesses and support local organizations and youth.

Daugaard went on to say that 98 percent of farms and ranches in South Dakota are family owned and operated and that the average age of the South Dakota farmer is 55.7 years. Each year one South Dakota producer raises enough food to feed 155 people in the U.S. and abroad. South Dakota’s agriculture industry has a $20.7 billion economic impact each year.

“With more that 19 million acres of cropland and 23 million acres of pasture land, our farmers and ranchers are one of our economy’s key drivers,” Daugaard said.

In addition to generating one-third of the state’s economic activity, agriculture and its associated industries employ more than 143,000 South Dakotans. This economic impact is a direct result of the state’s production capacity and investment in value-added industries. Businesses ranging from ethanol plants and livestock feeding operations to farmer’s markets and wineries capitalize on agriculture’s competitive and comparative advantages for economic development in South Dakota.

The South Dakota Livestock Auction Markets Association (SDLAMA) held their 2011 Annual Meeting Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at the Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, SD. The meeting was well attended, with a powerful line-up of speakers.

Speaker Randy Buchholz, a loan officer for Heartland State Bank, began the meeting by discussing Livestock Risk Protection, a tool for producers to control risk by using livestock insurance. This can prove very beneficial for cow-calf operators, yearling buyers, backgrounding and finishing cattle. Martin E. Mortenson, Farm Service Agency (FSA) farm loan manager from Winner, SD. Mortenson talked about how FSA could help young producers to get started in agriculture. Mortenson reported that he’s had great success in establishing loans for new, young producers.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) Dean of Agriculture and Biological Sciences Barry Dunn, spoke about growing rural South Dakota. To grow the South Dakota cattle industry, he said, there are five main points: increase cow numbers; increase backgrounding; build a packing plant; increase cattle feeding; and import more feeder cattle to be backgrounded or fed. Dunn said in order for this to happen, a shared vision needs to be established, in which he walked the crowd through his thought process:

A vision statement is a description of what the organization will look like after it successfully implements its strategies and achieves its full potential. Next conduct a SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This is an organized method of evaluating the internal environment (strengths and weaknesses) and external environment (opportunities and threats) of the organization.

Dunn then went on to point out strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the South Dakota cattle industry. Strengths, he said, included the quality of cattle; quality of people; strong transparent market; stable, positive cattle basis; and negative feed basis. The weaknesses he highlighted were: high grain prices; hard to get help; aging ranchers and farmers; weather/drought/floods; price of land; and distance from consumers. Opportunities he noted: backgrounding more cattle; young people who want to ranch and farm; possible packing plant; export markets; and the low U.S. cattle numbers. He concluded with an analysis of the threats to the South Dakota cattle industry: industry concentration; declining rural population; misinformed consumers; risk; and volatility in economy.

Secretary Walt Bones, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, also talked about growing rural South Dakota. He noted that in the state, there are more than 2,500 farm that have been in the same family for at least 100 years!

Ron Frederick, South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) executive director, spoke to attendees next. Frederick reported the amount of money that the SDBIC receives and how they promote the beef industry. He also discussed how the business has changed, and gave a status of the checkoff division, while also providing a brief overview of history of the federation.

Next up was Dustin Oedekoven, DVM, state veterinarian, South Dakota Animal Industry Board, discussed the general health requirements for admission of animals into the state.

Concluding Oedekoven’s presentation, the South Dakota State Brand Board Director Larry Stearns reported on the numbers of stolen livestock and stated that random livestock checks have been successful.

Governor Dennis Daugaard was the noon speaker at the SDLAMA annual meeting. Daugaard highlighted the importance of the livestock auction markets in South Dakota, noting that they play a very vital role in every community. Daugaard said there are 32 livestock markets in South Dakota that bring jobs, economic growth, business to other local businesses and support local organizations and youth.

Daugaard went on to say that 98 percent of farms and ranches in South Dakota are family owned and operated and that the average age of the South Dakota farmer is 55.7 years. Each year one South Dakota producer raises enough food to feed 155 people in the U.S. and abroad. South Dakota’s agriculture industry has a $20.7 billion economic impact each year.

“With more that 19 million acres of cropland and 23 million acres of pasture land, our farmers and ranchers are one of our economy’s key drivers,” Daugaard said.

In addition to generating one-third of the state’s economic activity, agriculture and its associated industries employ more than 143,000 South Dakotans. This economic impact is a direct result of the state’s production capacity and investment in value-added industries. Businesses ranging from ethanol plants and livestock feeding operations to farmer’s markets and wineries capitalize on agriculture’s competitive and comparative advantages for economic development in South Dakota.

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