South Korean government admits errors in battling foot and disease | TSLN.com

South Korean government admits errors in battling foot and disease

Slack monitoring and belated quarantine measures were the main factors behind the nationwide spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), South Korean authorities said Jan. 25, acknowledging for the first time that their initial mismanagement of the disease resulted in enormous damage to the country.

The National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service released an interim report on the animal disease, reflecting on what went wrong in dealing with it as it outpaced the government’s quarantine efforts.

According to the report, a hog farm in Andong reported a suspicious FMD case on Nov. 23. But the authorities took lukewarm action, because the result of a simple test kit was negative. Five days later, however, the result of a larger-scale test was positive.

The authorities hastily launched a quarantine operation, but the virus had already spread. “If quarantine officials there reported the suspicious case to headquarters, we may have been able to start the operation about a week earlier,” the report said, acknowledging the mistake.

Since that first outbreak was confirmed, FMD has spread almost throughout the country, forcing officials to cull more than 2.5 million livestock.

Slack monitoring and belated quarantine measures were the main factors behind the nationwide spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), South Korean authorities said Jan. 25, acknowledging for the first time that their initial mismanagement of the disease resulted in enormous damage to the country.

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The National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service released an interim report on the animal disease, reflecting on what went wrong in dealing with it as it outpaced the government’s quarantine efforts.

According to the report, a hog farm in Andong reported a suspicious FMD case on Nov. 23. But the authorities took lukewarm action, because the result of a simple test kit was negative. Five days later, however, the result of a larger-scale test was positive.

The authorities hastily launched a quarantine operation, but the virus had already spread. “If quarantine officials there reported the suspicious case to headquarters, we may have been able to start the operation about a week earlier,” the report said, acknowledging the mistake.

Since that first outbreak was confirmed, FMD has spread almost throughout the country, forcing officials to cull more than 2.5 million livestock.

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