Storage options for wet byproducts | TSLN.com

Storage options for wet byproducts

Department Head, NDSU Animal Sciences

As we move into late spring and summer, seasonal demand for a variety of feed byproducts starts to lag. This creates buying opportunities for many wet commodities as processing companies lower prices to move product. The biggest challenge with wet byproducts on any farm, ranch or feedyard is storage, especially if you are looking at long term storage. In this week’s column, I’ll offer you some tips on storing these wet byproducts so that you can potentially take advantage of some of the pricing opportunities which may come your way this spring and summer.

Wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) is probably the most common wet byproduct available in most areas covered by Tri-State Livestock News. However, there are also areas where byproducts such as sugar beet pulp, potato processing byproducts and wet corn gluten feed are also produced. In this article, I’ll focus on WDGS, but the principles used to store WDGS also apply to a variety of other wet byproducts.

WDGS is a product that contains approximately 65 percent moisture. Many plants also produce a product referred to as modified WDGS which typically contains about 50 percent moisture. This product can be shipped further in a more cost effective manner because it contains less moisture.

As we move into late spring and summer, seasonal demand for a variety of feed byproducts starts to lag. This creates buying opportunities for many wet commodities as processing companies lower prices to move product. The biggest challenge with wet byproducts on any farm, ranch or feedyard is storage, especially if you are looking at long term storage. In this week’s column, I’ll offer you some tips on storing these wet byproducts so that you can potentially take advantage of some of the pricing opportunities which may come your way this spring and summer.

Wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) is probably the most common wet byproduct available in most areas covered by Tri-State Livestock News. However, there are also areas where byproducts such as sugar beet pulp, potato processing byproducts and wet corn gluten feed are also produced. In this article, I’ll focus on WDGS, but the principles used to store WDGS also apply to a variety of other wet byproducts.

WDGS is a product that contains approximately 65 percent moisture. Many plants also produce a product referred to as modified WDGS which typically contains about 50 percent moisture. This product can be shipped further in a more cost effective manner because it contains less moisture.

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As we move into late spring and summer, seasonal demand for a variety of feed byproducts starts to lag. This creates buying opportunities for many wet commodities as processing companies lower prices to move product. The biggest challenge with wet byproducts on any farm, ranch or feedyard is storage, especially if you are looking at long term storage. In this week’s column, I’ll offer you some tips on storing these wet byproducts so that you can potentially take advantage of some of the pricing opportunities which may come your way this spring and summer.

Wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) is probably the most common wet byproduct available in most areas covered by Tri-State Livestock News. However, there are also areas where byproducts such as sugar beet pulp, potato processing byproducts and wet corn gluten feed are also produced. In this article, I’ll focus on WDGS, but the principles used to store WDGS also apply to a variety of other wet byproducts.

WDGS is a product that contains approximately 65 percent moisture. Many plants also produce a product referred to as modified WDGS which typically contains about 50 percent moisture. This product can be shipped further in a more cost effective manner because it contains less moisture.

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