Stout Maines | TSLN.com

Stout Maines

Amanda Nolz

Stout photoAt the ranch in DeSmet, SD.

Ask Dave Stout for the secret of success in the beef cattle business, and he will tell you a thing or two.

“Being a cattle breeder is like being a chess player,” said Stout, owner and operator of Stout Maines in DeSmet, SD. “You have to think about your move before you make it, and sometimes you have to think three moves ahead of the game. I spent 20 years planning my moves for my dream cowherd before making it a reality.”

Showing and raising livestock is in Stout’s blood. He attended his first state fair at age seven months, and he has been around the cattle business ever since. Knowing there wasn’t room to add another family to his parents’ cattle operation in Iowa, Dave began working a variety of jobs and pursuing a higher education with the hopes that someday he would be able to afford to build his own cattle herd.

“If there was one piece of advice that I learned from my father, it’s that you can’t teach want to,” said Stout, who today raises Maine Anjou cattle for the commercial cattleman. “If you don’t want to, you won’t be able to. I knew I wanted to have good cattle someday.”

Ask Dave Stout for the secret of success in the beef cattle business, and he will tell you a thing or two.

“Being a cattle breeder is like being a chess player,” said Stout, owner and operator of Stout Maines in DeSmet, SD. “You have to think about your move before you make it, and sometimes you have to think three moves ahead of the game. I spent 20 years planning my moves for my dream cowherd before making it a reality.”

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Showing and raising livestock is in Stout’s blood. He attended his first state fair at age seven months, and he has been around the cattle business ever since. Knowing there wasn’t room to add another family to his parents’ cattle operation in Iowa, Dave began working a variety of jobs and pursuing a higher education with the hopes that someday he would be able to afford to build his own cattle herd.

“If there was one piece of advice that I learned from my father, it’s that you can’t teach want to,” said Stout, who today raises Maine Anjou cattle for the commercial cattleman. “If you don’t want to, you won’t be able to. I knew I wanted to have good cattle someday.”

Ask Dave Stout for the secret of success in the beef cattle business, and he will tell you a thing or two.

“Being a cattle breeder is like being a chess player,” said Stout, owner and operator of Stout Maines in DeSmet, SD. “You have to think about your move before you make it, and sometimes you have to think three moves ahead of the game. I spent 20 years planning my moves for my dream cowherd before making it a reality.”

Showing and raising livestock is in Stout’s blood. He attended his first state fair at age seven months, and he has been around the cattle business ever since. Knowing there wasn’t room to add another family to his parents’ cattle operation in Iowa, Dave began working a variety of jobs and pursuing a higher education with the hopes that someday he would be able to afford to build his own cattle herd.

“If there was one piece of advice that I learned from my father, it’s that you can’t teach want to,” said Stout, who today raises Maine Anjou cattle for the commercial cattleman. “If you don’t want to, you won’t be able to. I knew I wanted to have good cattle someday.”

Ask Dave Stout for the secret of success in the beef cattle business, and he will tell you a thing or two.

“Being a cattle breeder is like being a chess player,” said Stout, owner and operator of Stout Maines in DeSmet, SD. “You have to think about your move before you make it, and sometimes you have to think three moves ahead of the game. I spent 20 years planning my moves for my dream cowherd before making it a reality.”

Showing and raising livestock is in Stout’s blood. He attended his first state fair at age seven months, and he has been around the cattle business ever since. Knowing there wasn’t room to add another family to his parents’ cattle operation in Iowa, Dave began working a variety of jobs and pursuing a higher education with the hopes that someday he would be able to afford to build his own cattle herd.

“If there was one piece of advice that I learned from my father, it’s that you can’t teach want to,” said Stout, who today raises Maine Anjou cattle for the commercial cattleman. “If you don’t want to, you won’t be able to. I knew I wanted to have good cattle someday.”

Ask Dave Stout for the secret of success in the beef cattle business, and he will tell you a thing or two.

“Being a cattle breeder is like being a chess player,” said Stout, owner and operator of Stout Maines in DeSmet, SD. “You have to think about your move before you make it, and sometimes you have to think three moves ahead of the game. I spent 20 years planning my moves for my dream cowherd before making it a reality.”

Showing and raising livestock is in Stout’s blood. He attended his first state fair at age seven months, and he has been around the cattle business ever since. Knowing there wasn’t room to add another family to his parents’ cattle operation in Iowa, Dave began working a variety of jobs and pursuing a higher education with the hopes that someday he would be able to afford to build his own cattle herd.

“If there was one piece of advice that I learned from my father, it’s that you can’t teach want to,” said Stout, who today raises Maine Anjou cattle for the commercial cattleman. “If you don’t want to, you won’t be able to. I knew I wanted to have good cattle someday.”

this article appears in the 2009 winter cattle journal, a publication of tri-state livestock news.

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