The Korkow legacy | TSLN.com

The Korkow legacy

Photo by Maria TussingJim (left) and TJ Korkow at the induction ceremony in Colorado Spings.

For 50 years running the Anchor K brand has graced the hips of bucking horses and bulls at professional rodeo’s biggest events. From the first National Finals Rodeo in Dallas, TX in 1959, to the 2009 NFR in Las Vegas, the Korkow family has been turning out the best of the best in rodeo stock.

The man who started it all, Erv Korkow, was recently honored with an induction into the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, CO. Erv, who ranched near Blunt, SD until his death in 1993, was honored for his more than 60 years of involvement in the business of rodeo. Three generations and 53 members of the Korkow family were on hand to celebrate Erv’s contributions to the sport. His son, Jim, who now runs Korkow Rodeos, accepted the award on behalf of his father. “I was awful damn proud,” Jim said.

Erv grew up on the family ranch near Blunt in the 1920s and 30s. He quit school after the eighth grade to help pay the bills. Once he’d saved some money he started investing his earnings in horses. He’d buy horses that the owners couldn’t afford to feed anymore and take them back to the ranch, where he’d feed them out and sell them.

“He put up thistles in ditches and went all over getting feed for these horses,” Jim said.

The family lost the ranch in the 30s, but after Erv went to work he bought the ranch back, and earned enough to put all five of his sisters through the courses required for a teacher’s certificate. He wanted them to be able to make their own living, Jim said.

In 1945 Erv moved to Blunt, where he bought a car dealership, selling Dodges and DeSotos, and ran a service station and started a trucking business. Dennis “Swede” Larson, now mayor of Blunt, worked for Erv as his first job.

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“I call it Korkow University,” Larson said. “I started out working at the gas station and ended up driving trucks. No matter what you did for Erv you got an education. He was an excellent businessman.”

In addition to his town pursuits, Erv still ran the ranch. It wasn’t long before he started the Blunt Rodeo Club. He got members together to build chutes and an arena with back pens near the salebarn. The first rodeo was in 1947. Admission was a dollar a carload.

For 50 years running the Anchor K brand has graced the hips of bucking horses and bulls at professional rodeo’s biggest events. From the first National Finals Rodeo in Dallas, TX in 1959, to the 2009 NFR in Las Vegas, the Korkow family has been turning out the best of the best in rodeo stock.

The man who started it all, Erv Korkow, was recently honored with an induction into the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, CO. Erv, who ranched near Blunt, SD until his death in 1993, was honored for his more than 60 years of involvement in the business of rodeo. Three generations and 53 members of the Korkow family were on hand to celebrate Erv’s contributions to the sport. His son, Jim, who now runs Korkow Rodeos, accepted the award on behalf of his father. “I was awful damn proud,” Jim said.

Erv grew up on the family ranch near Blunt in the 1920s and 30s. He quit school after the eighth grade to help pay the bills. Once he’d saved some money he started investing his earnings in horses. He’d buy horses that the owners couldn’t afford to feed anymore and take them back to the ranch, where he’d feed them out and sell them.

“He put up thistles in ditches and went all over getting feed for these horses,” Jim said.

The family lost the ranch in the 30s, but after Erv went to work he bought the ranch back, and earned enough to put all five of his sisters through the courses required for a teacher’s certificate. He wanted them to be able to make their own living, Jim said.

In 1945 Erv moved to Blunt, where he bought a car dealership, selling Dodges and DeSotos, and ran a service station and started a trucking business. Dennis “Swede” Larson, now mayor of Blunt, worked for Erv as his first job.

“I call it Korkow University,” Larson said. “I started out working at the gas station and ended up driving trucks. No matter what you did for Erv you got an education. He was an excellent businessman.”

In addition to his town pursuits, Erv still ran the ranch. It wasn’t long before he started the Blunt Rodeo Club. He got members together to build chutes and an arena with back pens near the salebarn. The first rodeo was in 1947. Admission was a dollar a carload.

For 50 years running the Anchor K brand has graced the hips of bucking horses and bulls at professional rodeo’s biggest events. From the first National Finals Rodeo in Dallas, TX in 1959, to the 2009 NFR in Las Vegas, the Korkow family has been turning out the best of the best in rodeo stock.

The man who started it all, Erv Korkow, was recently honored with an induction into the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs, CO. Erv, who ranched near Blunt, SD until his death in 1993, was honored for his more than 60 years of involvement in the business of rodeo. Three generations and 53 members of the Korkow family were on hand to celebrate Erv’s contributions to the sport. His son, Jim, who now runs Korkow Rodeos, accepted the award on behalf of his father. “I was awful damn proud,” Jim said.

Erv grew up on the family ranch near Blunt in the 1920s and 30s. He quit school after the eighth grade to help pay the bills. Once he’d saved some money he started investing his earnings in horses. He’d buy horses that the owners couldn’t afford to feed anymore and take them back to the ranch, where he’d feed them out and sell them.

“He put up thistles in ditches and went all over getting feed for these horses,” Jim said.

The family lost the ranch in the 30s, but after Erv went to work he bought the ranch back, and earned enough to put all five of his sisters through the courses required for a teacher’s certificate. He wanted them to be able to make their own living, Jim said.

In 1945 Erv moved to Blunt, where he bought a car dealership, selling Dodges and DeSotos, and ran a service station and started a trucking business. Dennis “Swede” Larson, now mayor of Blunt, worked for Erv as his first job.

“I call it Korkow University,” Larson said. “I started out working at the gas station and ended up driving trucks. No matter what you did for Erv you got an education. He was an excellent businessman.”

In addition to his town pursuits, Erv still ran the ranch. It wasn’t long before he started the Blunt Rodeo Club. He got members together to build chutes and an arena with back pens near the salebarn. The first rodeo was in 1947. Admission was a dollar a carload.

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