The Outside Circle: Road trip; old guys rodeo, too; updates on political stuff & tail lights | TSLN.com

The Outside Circle: Road trip; old guys rodeo, too; updates on political stuff & tail lights

I made a big circle up through North Dakota to Fargo, then back through eastern South Dakota and home over a long weekend. Saw a lot of country that sure had ample moisture. Some had received too much, as I saw a center pivot partially underwater west of Jamestown. There’s lots of hay to be stacked and harvest is in full swing in the farm country. I had to think just how blessed we are to be living where we do. We had plenty of rain but not much flooding and lots of good grass.

Congrats to Kurt Manke, Belle Fourche, SD, on winning the 50 and over saddle broncs at the National Senior ProRodeo Finals in Las Vegas, Oct. 5-8. Good to see he’s still in top form. Also at the Senior Pro Finals, in the 50 and over Steer Wrestling, second place was won by Lonnie Olson, who grew up near Belle Fourche, though I’m not sure where he lives now. Third in that event and division was Rodney Nelson of Almont, ND. I’m thinking there would have to be some horse liniment rubbed on some knees in that division.

At the Headless Horseman Barrel Race at Bowman, ND, on Oct. 28-30, the 1D Sunday open winner was Cami Bauer on Guys Champagne Girl, owned by Bill and Deb Myers. They had the fastest time of the weekend, too. Cami trains near St. Onge, SD, and does a super nice job on her horses. They like her and like their jobs and that’s always nice to see. Congrats to all.

Korkow Rodeo’s Queenie will be making her 11th trip to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (WNFR) in December. She joins eight others from Korkow’s string. Korkow stock has been selected by the cowboys for every National Finals since 1959.

The low stress livestock handling workshop at Chadron on Nov. 12 has another phone number you can call and may have more luck reaching them. It’s 308-432-6367. The other one was the home number. The workshop will feature Dr. Tom Noffsinger as the instructor.

The Child Labor Law proposal that would keep our ranch and farm kids from working on ranches and farms, has an extended comment period. Thanks to a bipartisan group from the House of Representatives, 78 signatures were on that request. You can call the Department of Labor at 888-232-2626 and comment on RIN 1235-AA06. Be sure to use that number so they know what proposal you’re talking about. You have until Dec. 1 to do it now, but please don’t put it off. Our agricultural heritage is at stake here.

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Good news! The Senate just passed the 2012 Agricultural Appropriations Bill without any riders prohibiting humane horse slaughter. However, there’s still rough ground ahead as the ag appropriations bill moves to conference committee to iron out the differences between the pro-horse industry Senate bill and the House bill, which includes riders HSUS attached to it since 2007. Those riders prohibit USDA from providing inspection to ensure human handling and food quality in the U.S.

I saw a commercial paid for by HSUS to raise funds for their bloated bank accounts and it had the required sick kittens, abused dogs, cute puppies, downer Holstein, starving horse, and baby seal. They talked of all the good they do for the neglected, starved, abused animals all over the U.S. and that the viewers needed to send money to them to help them fund the nation’s animal shelters. Wait a cotton-picking minute! HSUS spends less than 2 percent of their over $36 million dollar annual budget helping shelters. Between 1998-2009, HSUS put more money into their pension funds than it gave to shelters nationwide. People are gullible and if they don’t check out the organizations they support, they can be sending their money to organizations that do nothing to help those they claim to be helping. HSUS is one of many radical animal rights groups that have scammed well-meaning people out of millions annually.

HSUS, in 2008 alone, funneled over $2,000,000 to political front groups. That’s not helping the shelters and animal rescues. HSUS was a big player in the closing of horse slaughter plants, right along with PETA and individuals like Willie Nelson. Be proactive when you donate money and find out just how it’s spent.

Keep in mind, animal shelters like the one in your town, are completely self-funded through donations and local organizations. They are in no way associated with HSUS. So, support them if you can.

The only time you’ll see HSUS in the local news is when they are seizing someone’s registered dog breeding business or confiscating someone’s horses. Once they’ve made the news and been in the headlines, they’re gone like political promises and the shelters and rescues are forced to care for the animals with no assistance to pay for it all.

I’ll climb down off of my soapbox now. I’m prone to getting a little worked up over this sort of thing, that’s all.

A cutting horse world great was laid to rest at Hall Cutting Horses in Weatherford, TX, on Oct. 13. Royal Blue Boon, inarguably the greatest producer of cutting horses in history, died of natural causes at the age of 31. By Boon Bar and out of Royal Tincie, she was the mama of such horses as Peptoboonsmal, Red White and Boon, Duals Blue Boon, Mecom Blue, Peppys From Heaven, etc. She was for sure a blue hen producer with her offspring earning over $2.6 million in the cowhorse arena.

On my way home the other night, on an unspecified highway that runs east and west across the state, I met over a half dozen pickups pulling stock trailers. Of all those I met, only one had working tail lights. Really guys? You know you’re going to get stopped and it’s not going to be pretty, so, just get ’em fixed, okay? Besides, you wouldn’t want some crazy running into the back of your trailer and causing a wreck. You might have your good horse in the trailer or your favorite little kid in the cab with you, and that would be terrible. I like all of you and would hate to see something bad happen to anyone.

Well, I’ve about ridden out this stretch of country, so it must be time to call it a day.

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