The true price discovery | TSLN.com

The true price discovery

Cody Volmer

To the Editor:

In response to the article “Pooling calves to make more profits at market” – I must ask how does Ron Skinner come to a price on the cattle sold in the country? Does he check the local market? The video sale? Or is he guru enough to know what their worth without these tools? I agree that pooling calves can be a benefit to cattle sellers everywhere. But, those cattle have to be uniform and healthy. I don’t know of a single livestock market that doesn’t try and get the highest dollars for any one customers cattle. And at the end of the day owns a few of those cattle themselves.

Is it easier for an order buyer to run 200 to 300 miles around the country to look at two loads of cattle or sit down at an auction (whether it’s video or sale barn) and look at 5,000-30,000? I think Mr. Skinner had better wake up to the fact that an auction is true price discovery and a necessity in the livestock business.

To the Editor:

In response to the article “Pooling calves to make more profits at market” – I must ask how does Ron Skinner come to a price on the cattle sold in the country? Does he check the local market? The video sale? Or is he guru enough to know what their worth without these tools? I agree that pooling calves can be a benefit to cattle sellers everywhere. But, those cattle have to be uniform and healthy. I don’t know of a single livestock market that doesn’t try and get the highest dollars for any one customers cattle. And at the end of the day owns a few of those cattle themselves.

Is it easier for an order buyer to run 200 to 300 miles around the country to look at two loads of cattle or sit down at an auction (whether it’s video or sale barn) and look at 5,000-30,000? I think Mr. Skinner had better wake up to the fact that an auction is true price discovery and a necessity in the livestock business.

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To the Editor:

In response to the article “Pooling calves to make more profits at market” – I must ask how does Ron Skinner come to a price on the cattle sold in the country? Does he check the local market? The video sale? Or is he guru enough to know what their worth without these tools? I agree that pooling calves can be a benefit to cattle sellers everywhere. But, those cattle have to be uniform and healthy. I don’t know of a single livestock market that doesn’t try and get the highest dollars for any one customers cattle. And at the end of the day owns a few of those cattle themselves.

Is it easier for an order buyer to run 200 to 300 miles around the country to look at two loads of cattle or sit down at an auction (whether it’s video or sale barn) and look at 5,000-30,000? I think Mr. Skinner had better wake up to the fact that an auction is true price discovery and a necessity in the livestock business.

To the Editor:

In response to the article “Pooling calves to make more profits at market” – I must ask how does Ron Skinner come to a price on the cattle sold in the country? Does he check the local market? The video sale? Or is he guru enough to know what their worth without these tools? I agree that pooling calves can be a benefit to cattle sellers everywhere. But, those cattle have to be uniform and healthy. I don’t know of a single livestock market that doesn’t try and get the highest dollars for any one customers cattle. And at the end of the day owns a few of those cattle themselves.

Is it easier for an order buyer to run 200 to 300 miles around the country to look at two loads of cattle or sit down at an auction (whether it’s video or sale barn) and look at 5,000-30,000? I think Mr. Skinner had better wake up to the fact that an auction is true price discovery and a necessity in the livestock business.

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