Tips on caring for horses as they age | TSLN.com

Tips on caring for horses as they age

Gayle Smith

The shiny brown mare grazes happily in the green grass swishing her tail as she bats away a stray fly. Looking at the healthy mare, no one would guess she was nearing 25 years old. Thanks to good management, the mare could have a long life ahead of her.

As horses age, they may need a little extra care. All horses age differently, but by keeping a close eye on their health, problems can be addressed as they arise. “Monitoring horses as they age is very important,” says Kathy Anderson, University of Nebraska extension horse specialist. “Horse owners should monitor the horse’s weight, and how it is getting along. I also encourage them to watch for any issues that come up, and address them before they become major.”

As a horse ages, their nutritional needs change, says University of Wyoming Equine Specialist Amy McLean. “If any older horse is starting to lose muscle tone, and is beginning to drop in weight, additional sources of fat and fiber may need to be added to the diet. Owners may also need to consider switching to a senior or complete feed, and feeding the horse two or three times a day. The horse may also need a more simplified form of forage that has been processed, and is easier to digest.”

The shiny brown mare grazes happily in the green grass swishing her tail as she bats away a stray fly. Looking at the healthy mare, no one would guess she was nearing 25 years old. Thanks to good management, the mare could have a long life ahead of her.

As horses age, they may need a little extra care. All horses age differently, but by keeping a close eye on their health, problems can be addressed as they arise. “Monitoring horses as they age is very important,” says Kathy Anderson, University of Nebraska extension horse specialist. “Horse owners should monitor the horse’s weight, and how it is getting along. I also encourage them to watch for any issues that come up, and address them before they become major.”

As a horse ages, their nutritional needs change, says University of Wyoming Equine Specialist Amy McLean. “If any older horse is starting to lose muscle tone, and is beginning to drop in weight, additional sources of fat and fiber may need to be added to the diet. Owners may also need to consider switching to a senior or complete feed, and feeding the horse two or three times a day. The horse may also need a more simplified form of forage that has been processed, and is easier to digest.”

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The shiny brown mare grazes happily in the green grass swishing her tail as she bats away a stray fly. Looking at the healthy mare, no one would guess she was nearing 25 years old. Thanks to good management, the mare could have a long life ahead of her.

As horses age, they may need a little extra care. All horses age differently, but by keeping a close eye on their health, problems can be addressed as they arise. “Monitoring horses as they age is very important,” says Kathy Anderson, University of Nebraska extension horse specialist. “Horse owners should monitor the horse’s weight, and how it is getting along. I also encourage them to watch for any issues that come up, and address them before they become major.”

As a horse ages, their nutritional needs change, says University of Wyoming Equine Specialist Amy McLean. “If any older horse is starting to lose muscle tone, and is beginning to drop in weight, additional sources of fat and fiber may need to be added to the diet. Owners may also need to consider switching to a senior or complete feed, and feeding the horse two or three times a day. The horse may also need a more simplified form of forage that has been processed, and is easier to digest.”

The shiny brown mare grazes happily in the green grass swishing her tail as she bats away a stray fly. Looking at the healthy mare, no one would guess she was nearing 25 years old. Thanks to good management, the mare could have a long life ahead of her.

As horses age, they may need a little extra care. All horses age differently, but by keeping a close eye on their health, problems can be addressed as they arise. “Monitoring horses as they age is very important,” says Kathy Anderson, University of Nebraska extension horse specialist. “Horse owners should monitor the horse’s weight, and how it is getting along. I also encourage them to watch for any issues that come up, and address them before they become major.”

As a horse ages, their nutritional needs change, says University of Wyoming Equine Specialist Amy McLean. “If any older horse is starting to lose muscle tone, and is beginning to drop in weight, additional sources of fat and fiber may need to be added to the diet. Owners may also need to consider switching to a senior or complete feed, and feeding the horse two or three times a day. The horse may also need a more simplified form of forage that has been processed, and is easier to digest.”

The shiny brown mare grazes happily in the green grass swishing her tail as she bats away a stray fly. Looking at the healthy mare, no one would guess she was nearing 25 years old. Thanks to good management, the mare could have a long life ahead of her.

As horses age, they may need a little extra care. All horses age differently, but by keeping a close eye on their health, problems can be addressed as they arise. “Monitoring horses as they age is very important,” says Kathy Anderson, University of Nebraska extension horse specialist. “Horse owners should monitor the horse’s weight, and how it is getting along. I also encourage them to watch for any issues that come up, and address them before they become major.”

As a horse ages, their nutritional needs change, says University of Wyoming Equine Specialist Amy McLean. “If any older horse is starting to lose muscle tone, and is beginning to drop in weight, additional sources of fat and fiber may need to be added to the diet. Owners may also need to consider switching to a senior or complete feed, and feeding the horse two or three times a day. The horse may also need a more simplified form of forage that has been processed, and is easier to digest.”

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