Top 10 ag stories of 2010 | TSLN.com

Top 10 ag stories of 2010

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

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With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

OMAHA (DTN) – Volatility can be a blessing or a curse. It provides risk or opportunity. And it definitely makes a year interesting, just as it did for 2010.

Markets were volatile in 2010 – commodities, stocks, financials. From corn futures that moved $1.88 in eight sessions (Oct. 4 through Oct. 13) and 56 cents in just two days (Oct. 8 through Oct. 12) to a bottoming dollar

Politics were volatile. Control of the House of Representatives was yanked out of the Democrats’ hands. Some long-time congressmen of both parties were surprised as Tea Party reform candidates gave them a run for their money – and in many cases won their seats.

That election-year upheaval was accompanied by volatility in governmental policy. The ethanol industry struggled through the year with uncertainty regarding its tax breaks and whether higher blends would be approved for use in newer cars. Food safety legislation moved to the forefront of legislators’ minds after a massive recall of a food heretofore considered to be relatively benign – the egg. Food contamination was among the issues, along with industry integration and possible monopolistic behavior, that led GIPSA to hold hearings directed at the consolidation in the food industry.

Social norms and mores were volatile. Groups such as the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) bought television and print advertising addressing what they view as the horrors of modern meat production. PETA planted hidden cameras in slaughterhouses. More people turned to local food, even raising chickens in their suburban backyards. The first lady continued her campaign to slim down our nation’s children, moving from backyard vegetable gardens to school cafeterias. And there was more demonizing of high-fructose corn syrup as some kind of evil, makes-more-fat-than-other-sweeteners sugar, even as corn groups ran advertisements reminding people that scientifically, sugar is sugar.

And, of course, 2010 featured volatility in areas that farmers are used to being volatile – weather, input prices, land prices, meat prices. Farming, thy name is volatility … it sure ain’t predictability.

With that, here are the top 10 ag news stories of 2010, as selected by DTN editors. We’re counting down from No. 10.

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