Tour explores feedlot runoff strategies | TSLN.com

Tour explores feedlot runoff strategies

Photo by Jan Swan WoodA Vale, SD area feedlot tour was held Friday, Aug. 22. One of the stops along tour included Blair Bros. Angus Ranch. Ed Blair (pictured in center) uses a vegetative treatment system that utilizes sediment basins but not a lagoon.

VALE, SD – A nutrient management tour visited three Vale area feedlots on Aug. 22 to observe how feedlot runoff is being managed and how that runoff is being utilized. The tour, led by Meade County Extension Agents Stacy Hadrick and Penny Nester and Butte County Extension Agent T.J. Swan, was a full afternoon of information and education co-sponsored by South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association.

The tour began with a bus ride to the H.L. Brunner and Sons feedlot northeast of Vale, where the host was Brad Brunner. This feedlot was established before any regulations regarding runoff were in place and is located directly on a major watershed near the Belle Fourche River on prime farm land.

The Brunners are permitted for 3,500 head of cattle with 40 acres of runoff potential. The soil is sandy loam with a gravel base, which made containment imperative in order to protect groundwater. Rather than move the existing feedlot, they chose to go with a dike system on the recommendation of environmental engineers. With cost share through Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Brunners invested $100/head (3,500 capacity) to move the dirt and build the dike. There were 25,000 yards of dirt moved to build the dike and lagoon.

The runoff from the pens flows into settling ponds on each end of the feedlot. The east settling pond holds the runoff from 25 to 30 acres of pens. When the pond reaches a certain level, a three phase pump turns on automatically to pump the water to the lagoon. This pumping station is totally enclosed and utilizes an automatic float system. When the pump shuts off, the water drains back into the holding pond to prevent plugging or freezing in the pipeline.

VALE, SD – A nutrient management tour visited three Vale area feedlots on Aug. 22 to observe how feedlot runoff is being managed and how that runoff is being utilized. The tour, led by Meade County Extension Agents Stacy Hadrick and Penny Nester and Butte County Extension Agent T.J. Swan, was a full afternoon of information and education co-sponsored by South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association.

The tour began with a bus ride to the H.L. Brunner and Sons feedlot northeast of Vale, where the host was Brad Brunner. This feedlot was established before any regulations regarding runoff were in place and is located directly on a major watershed near the Belle Fourche River on prime farm land.

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The Brunners are permitted for 3,500 head of cattle with 40 acres of runoff potential. The soil is sandy loam with a gravel base, which made containment imperative in order to protect groundwater. Rather than move the existing feedlot, they chose to go with a dike system on the recommendation of environmental engineers. With cost share through Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Brunners invested $100/head (3,500 capacity) to move the dirt and build the dike. There were 25,000 yards of dirt moved to build the dike and lagoon.

The runoff from the pens flows into settling ponds on each end of the feedlot. The east settling pond holds the runoff from 25 to 30 acres of pens. When the pond reaches a certain level, a three phase pump turns on automatically to pump the water to the lagoon. This pumping station is totally enclosed and utilizes an automatic float system. When the pump shuts off, the water drains back into the holding pond to prevent plugging or freezing in the pipeline.

VALE, SD – A nutrient management tour visited three Vale area feedlots on Aug. 22 to observe how feedlot runoff is being managed and how that runoff is being utilized. The tour, led by Meade County Extension Agents Stacy Hadrick and Penny Nester and Butte County Extension Agent T.J. Swan, was a full afternoon of information and education co-sponsored by South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association.

The tour began with a bus ride to the H.L. Brunner and Sons feedlot northeast of Vale, where the host was Brad Brunner. This feedlot was established before any regulations regarding runoff were in place and is located directly on a major watershed near the Belle Fourche River on prime farm land.

The Brunners are permitted for 3,500 head of cattle with 40 acres of runoff potential. The soil is sandy loam with a gravel base, which made containment imperative in order to protect groundwater. Rather than move the existing feedlot, they chose to go with a dike system on the recommendation of environmental engineers. With cost share through Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Brunners invested $100/head (3,500 capacity) to move the dirt and build the dike. There were 25,000 yards of dirt moved to build the dike and lagoon.

The runoff from the pens flows into settling ponds on each end of the feedlot. The east settling pond holds the runoff from 25 to 30 acres of pens. When the pond reaches a certain level, a three phase pump turns on automatically to pump the water to the lagoon. This pumping station is totally enclosed and utilizes an automatic float system. When the pump shuts off, the water drains back into the holding pond to prevent plugging or freezing in the pipeline.

VALE, SD – A nutrient management tour visited three Vale area feedlots on Aug. 22 to observe how feedlot runoff is being managed and how that runoff is being utilized. The tour, led by Meade County Extension Agents Stacy Hadrick and Penny Nester and Butte County Extension Agent T.J. Swan, was a full afternoon of information and education co-sponsored by South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association.

The tour began with a bus ride to the H.L. Brunner and Sons feedlot northeast of Vale, where the host was Brad Brunner. This feedlot was established before any regulations regarding runoff were in place and is located directly on a major watershed near the Belle Fourche River on prime farm land.

The Brunners are permitted for 3,500 head of cattle with 40 acres of runoff potential. The soil is sandy loam with a gravel base, which made containment imperative in order to protect groundwater. Rather than move the existing feedlot, they chose to go with a dike system on the recommendation of environmental engineers. With cost share through Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Brunners invested $100/head (3,500 capacity) to move the dirt and build the dike. There were 25,000 yards of dirt moved to build the dike and lagoon.

The runoff from the pens flows into settling ponds on each end of the feedlot. The east settling pond holds the runoff from 25 to 30 acres of pens. When the pond reaches a certain level, a three phase pump turns on automatically to pump the water to the lagoon. This pumping station is totally enclosed and utilizes an automatic float system. When the pump shuts off, the water drains back into the holding pond to prevent plugging or freezing in the pipeline.

VALE, SD – A nutrient management tour visited three Vale area feedlots on Aug. 22 to observe how feedlot runoff is being managed and how that runoff is being utilized. The tour, led by Meade County Extension Agents Stacy Hadrick and Penny Nester and Butte County Extension Agent T.J. Swan, was a full afternoon of information and education co-sponsored by South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association.

The tour began with a bus ride to the H.L. Brunner and Sons feedlot northeast of Vale, where the host was Brad Brunner. This feedlot was established before any regulations regarding runoff were in place and is located directly on a major watershed near the Belle Fourche River on prime farm land.

The Brunners are permitted for 3,500 head of cattle with 40 acres of runoff potential. The soil is sandy loam with a gravel base, which made containment imperative in order to protect groundwater. Rather than move the existing feedlot, they chose to go with a dike system on the recommendation of environmental engineers. With cost share through Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Brunners invested $100/head (3,500 capacity) to move the dirt and build the dike. There were 25,000 yards of dirt moved to build the dike and lagoon.

The runoff from the pens flows into settling ponds on each end of the feedlot. The east settling pond holds the runoff from 25 to 30 acres of pens. When the pond reaches a certain level, a three phase pump turns on automatically to pump the water to the lagoon. This pumping station is totally enclosed and utilizes an automatic float system. When the pump shuts off, the water drains back into the holding pond to prevent plugging or freezing in the pipeline.

VALE, SD – A nutrient management tour visited three Vale area feedlots on Aug. 22 to observe how feedlot runoff is being managed and how that runoff is being utilized. The tour, led by Meade County Extension Agents Stacy Hadrick and Penny Nester and Butte County Extension Agent T.J. Swan, was a full afternoon of information and education co-sponsored by South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association.

The tour began with a bus ride to the H.L. Brunner and Sons feedlot northeast of Vale, where the host was Brad Brunner. This feedlot was established before any regulations regarding runoff were in place and is located directly on a major watershed near the Belle Fourche River on prime farm land.

The Brunners are permitted for 3,500 head of cattle with 40 acres of runoff potential. The soil is sandy loam with a gravel base, which made containment imperative in order to protect groundwater. Rather than move the existing feedlot, they chose to go with a dike system on the recommendation of environmental engineers. With cost share through Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Brunners invested $100/head (3,500 capacity) to move the dirt and build the dike. There were 25,000 yards of dirt moved to build the dike and lagoon.

The runoff from the pens flows into settling ponds on each end of the feedlot. The east settling pond holds the runoff from 25 to 30 acres of pens. When the pond reaches a certain level, a three phase pump turns on automatically to pump the water to the lagoon. This pumping station is totally enclosed and utilizes an automatic float system. When the pump shuts off, the water drains back into the holding pond to prevent plugging or freezing in the pipeline.

VALE, SD – A nutrient management tour visited three Vale area feedlots on Aug. 22 to observe how feedlot runoff is being managed and how that runoff is being utilized. The tour, led by Meade County Extension Agents Stacy Hadrick and Penny Nester and Butte County Extension Agent T.J. Swan, was a full afternoon of information and education co-sponsored by South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association.

The tour began with a bus ride to the H.L. Brunner and Sons feedlot northeast of Vale, where the host was Brad Brunner. This feedlot was established before any regulations regarding runoff were in place and is located directly on a major watershed near the Belle Fourche River on prime farm land.

The Brunners are permitted for 3,500 head of cattle with 40 acres of runoff potential. The soil is sandy loam with a gravel base, which made containment imperative in order to protect groundwater. Rather than move the existing feedlot, they chose to go with a dike system on the recommendation of environmental engineers. With cost share through Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Brunners invested $100/head (3,500 capacity) to move the dirt and build the dike. There were 25,000 yards of dirt moved to build the dike and lagoon.

The runoff from the pens flows into settling ponds on each end of the feedlot. The east settling pond holds the runoff from 25 to 30 acres of pens. When the pond reaches a certain level, a three phase pump turns on automatically to pump the water to the lagoon. This pumping station is totally enclosed and utilizes an automatic float system. When the pump shuts off, the water drains back into the holding pond to prevent plugging or freezing in the pipeline.

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