Tysdal Ranches | TSLN.com

Tysdal Ranches

Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns

Tysdal photo

Our wide open West is blessed with strong communities, good schools, fair political representation and good neighbors. How often we take those blessings for granted, not realizing just how meaningful they are… or from whence they come.

In pondering such things about this area I call home, I began to consider the backgrounds of some of the families that have been here for a century or so, through several generations. Take the Tysdal family, for instance.

Patriarch Lars Tysdal was born in Norway in 1887. At the age of 17 he left family, friends, everything that was familiar – and crossed the pond to America, in search of a better life. The first work he found was with a railroad in Wisconsin. Soon he drifted westward, finding work in underground gold and silver mines in Lead, SD. The open country beckoned him, and before long he bought a homestead in the edge of the Black Hills, in Pennington County, SD. It was a homestead just begun, but not proven up, and Lars Tysdal paid $25 for it, then finished proving up.

There, he and his wife started a cattle ranch, and reared a son Lloyd, and a daughter Inga. When Lloyd started to country school he came home and told his parents they spoke a different language there, and he couldn’t communicate. Those words caused the elder Tysdal’s to make an important decision, and from that day forward they spoke nothing but English in their home! After a few years of elementary education in the rural school, the family found lodging in Lead where Mrs. Tysdal could move with the kids in the winter, allowing them to attend junior high and high school there.

That was a real sacrifice, entailing months of separation from Lars, with no means of communication to know if he was okay while working alone with livestock in the bitter winter weather. The sacrifices paid off, as Lloyd and Inga both taught school for a time after graduation; sowing back into their communities by modeling responsibility, discipline, integrity and ambition to another generation.

The Tysdal’s had Hereford cattle, and in addition to being beef producers they milked their cows, selling milk and cream to increase their income. They bought several surrounding homesteads to expand their original place, and they cut wild hay in summer to feed the cattle during the deep snow winters common to the region.

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Our wide open West is blessed with strong communities, good schools, fair political representation and good neighbors. How often we take those blessings for granted, not realizing just how meaningful they are… or from whence they come.

In pondering such things about this area I call home, I began to consider the backgrounds of some of the families that have been here for a century or so, through several generations. Take the Tysdal family, for instance.

Patriarch Lars Tysdal was born in Norway in 1887. At the age of 17 he left family, friends, everything that was familiar – and crossed the pond to America, in search of a better life. The first work he found was with a railroad in Wisconsin. Soon he drifted westward, finding work in underground gold and silver mines in Lead, SD. The open country beckoned him, and before long he bought a homestead in the edge of the Black Hills, in Pennington County, SD. It was a homestead just begun, but not proven up, and Lars Tysdal paid $25 for it, then finished proving up.

There, he and his wife started a cattle ranch, and reared a son Lloyd, and a daughter Inga. When Lloyd started to country school he came home and told his parents they spoke a different language there, and he couldn’t communicate. Those words caused the elder Tysdal’s to make an important decision, and from that day forward they spoke nothing but English in their home! After a few years of elementary education in the rural school, the family found lodging in Lead where Mrs. Tysdal could move with the kids in the winter, allowing them to attend junior high and high school there.

That was a real sacrifice, entailing months of separation from Lars, with no means of communication to know if he was okay while working alone with livestock in the bitter winter weather. The sacrifices paid off, as Lloyd and Inga both taught school for a time after graduation; sowing back into their communities by modeling responsibility, discipline, integrity and ambition to another generation.

The Tysdal’s had Hereford cattle, and in addition to being beef producers they milked their cows, selling milk and cream to increase their income. They bought several surrounding homesteads to expand their original place, and they cut wild hay in summer to feed the cattle during the deep snow winters common to the region.

Our wide open West is blessed with strong communities, good schools, fair political representation and good neighbors. How often we take those blessings for granted, not realizing just how meaningful they are… or from whence they come.

In pondering such things about this area I call home, I began to consider the backgrounds of some of the families that have been here for a century or so, through several generations. Take the Tysdal family, for instance.

Patriarch Lars Tysdal was born in Norway in 1887. At the age of 17 he left family, friends, everything that was familiar – and crossed the pond to America, in search of a better life. The first work he found was with a railroad in Wisconsin. Soon he drifted westward, finding work in underground gold and silver mines in Lead, SD. The open country beckoned him, and before long he bought a homestead in the edge of the Black Hills, in Pennington County, SD. It was a homestead just begun, but not proven up, and Lars Tysdal paid $25 for it, then finished proving up.

There, he and his wife started a cattle ranch, and reared a son Lloyd, and a daughter Inga. When Lloyd started to country school he came home and told his parents they spoke a different language there, and he couldn’t communicate. Those words caused the elder Tysdal’s to make an important decision, and from that day forward they spoke nothing but English in their home! After a few years of elementary education in the rural school, the family found lodging in Lead where Mrs. Tysdal could move with the kids in the winter, allowing them to attend junior high and high school there.

That was a real sacrifice, entailing months of separation from Lars, with no means of communication to know if he was okay while working alone with livestock in the bitter winter weather. The sacrifices paid off, as Lloyd and Inga both taught school for a time after graduation; sowing back into their communities by modeling responsibility, discipline, integrity and ambition to another generation.

The Tysdal’s had Hereford cattle, and in addition to being beef producers they milked their cows, selling milk and cream to increase their income. They bought several surrounding homesteads to expand their original place, and they cut wild hay in summer to feed the cattle during the deep snow winters common to the region.

Our wide open West is blessed with strong communities, good schools, fair political representation and good neighbors. How often we take those blessings for granted, not realizing just how meaningful they are… or from whence they come.

In pondering such things about this area I call home, I began to consider the backgrounds of some of the families that have been here for a century or so, through several generations. Take the Tysdal family, for instance.

Patriarch Lars Tysdal was born in Norway in 1887. At the age of 17 he left family, friends, everything that was familiar – and crossed the pond to America, in search of a better life. The first work he found was with a railroad in Wisconsin. Soon he drifted westward, finding work in underground gold and silver mines in Lead, SD. The open country beckoned him, and before long he bought a homestead in the edge of the Black Hills, in Pennington County, SD. It was a homestead just begun, but not proven up, and Lars Tysdal paid $25 for it, then finished proving up.

There, he and his wife started a cattle ranch, and reared a son Lloyd, and a daughter Inga. When Lloyd started to country school he came home and told his parents they spoke a different language there, and he couldn’t communicate. Those words caused the elder Tysdal’s to make an important decision, and from that day forward they spoke nothing but English in their home! After a few years of elementary education in the rural school, the family found lodging in Lead where Mrs. Tysdal could move with the kids in the winter, allowing them to attend junior high and high school there.

That was a real sacrifice, entailing months of separation from Lars, with no means of communication to know if he was okay while working alone with livestock in the bitter winter weather. The sacrifices paid off, as Lloyd and Inga both taught school for a time after graduation; sowing back into their communities by modeling responsibility, discipline, integrity and ambition to another generation.

The Tysdal’s had Hereford cattle, and in addition to being beef producers they milked their cows, selling milk and cream to increase their income. They bought several surrounding homesteads to expand their original place, and they cut wild hay in summer to feed the cattle during the deep snow winters common to the region.

Our wide open West is blessed with strong communities, good schools, fair political representation and good neighbors. How often we take those blessings for granted, not realizing just how meaningful they are… or from whence they come.

In pondering such things about this area I call home, I began to consider the backgrounds of some of the families that have been here for a century or so, through several generations. Take the Tysdal family, for instance.

Patriarch Lars Tysdal was born in Norway in 1887. At the age of 17 he left family, friends, everything that was familiar – and crossed the pond to America, in search of a better life. The first work he found was with a railroad in Wisconsin. Soon he drifted westward, finding work in underground gold and silver mines in Lead, SD. The open country beckoned him, and before long he bought a homestead in the edge of the Black Hills, in Pennington County, SD. It was a homestead just begun, but not proven up, and Lars Tysdal paid $25 for it, then finished proving up.

There, he and his wife started a cattle ranch, and reared a son Lloyd, and a daughter Inga. When Lloyd started to country school he came home and told his parents they spoke a different language there, and he couldn’t communicate. Those words caused the elder Tysdal’s to make an important decision, and from that day forward they spoke nothing but English in their home! After a few years of elementary education in the rural school, the family found lodging in Lead where Mrs. Tysdal could move with the kids in the winter, allowing them to attend junior high and high school there.

That was a real sacrifice, entailing months of separation from Lars, with no means of communication to know if he was okay while working alone with livestock in the bitter winter weather. The sacrifices paid off, as Lloyd and Inga both taught school for a time after graduation; sowing back into their communities by modeling responsibility, discipline, integrity and ambition to another generation.

The Tysdal’s had Hereford cattle, and in addition to being beef producers they milked their cows, selling milk and cream to increase their income. They bought several surrounding homesteads to expand their original place, and they cut wild hay in summer to feed the cattle during the deep snow winters common to the region.

this article appears in the 2009 winter cattle journal, a publication of tri-state livestock news.

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