U.S. beef, pork exports show strength in first quarter | TSLN.com

U.S. beef, pork exports show strength in first quarter

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U.S. beef and pork muscle cut exports performed well in March, concluding the first quarter of 2010 with increasing momentum. A sluggish global market for variety meat held down the overall totals, but muscle cut export value for both products are running ahead of their 2009 pace.

Beef muscle cuts are off to a particularly strong start in 2010, increasing 22 percent in volume to 156,947 metric tons (346 million pounds) for the quarter. The increase in value was even higher, up 24 percent to $678 million. The combined beef/beef variety meat totals are also impressive, rising 11 percent in volume (to 225,122 metric tons or 496.3 million pounds) and 14 percent in value (to $788.5 million). Total beef exports accounted for 10.6 percent of overall production in March compared to 9.4 percent in March 2009. Export value per steer and heifer slaughtered equated to $127.40, compared to $110.67 last year.

Pork muscle cut exports pulled ahead of their 2009 pace by one percent in volume (356,297 metric tons or 785.5 million pounds) and two percent in value ($941.9 million). Combined pork/pork variety meat totals are slightly behind last year in both volume (468,793 metric tons or one billion pounds) and value ($1.11 billion).

On a positive note, the value of total pork exports in March edged up one percent compared to March 2009, and it was 18 percent ahead of the value of pork exports in March 2008, a record-setting year for U.S. pork exports.

Pork exports accounted for 22.5 percent of total production compared to 25 percent in March 2009, but muscle cut exports accounted for 19 percent of production, the same as one year ago. Per-head pork export value equated to $39.80 – which is down about $1 from March 2009.

The results for both beef and pork exports were achieved despite significant declines in each of their leading value markets. Beef exports to Mexico continue to struggle due to weakness in Mexico’s economy. Though beef muscle cut exports managed to pull within seven percent in volume and 10 percent in value of their 2009 pace, variety meat exports to Mexico are still down dramatically.

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Pork exports to Japan – which exceeded $1.5 billion in each of the last two calendar years – have slowed due to unusually high inventories of domestic pork. Muscle cut exports to Japan are within 13 percent in volume and 11 percent in value of last year’s pace. But while variety meat makes up only a small portion of the U.S. pork shipped to Japan, those exports are down 62 percent in volume and 46 percent in value.

U.S. beef and pork muscle cut exports performed well in March, concluding the first quarter of 2010 with increasing momentum. A sluggish global market for variety meat held down the overall totals, but muscle cut export value for both products are running ahead of their 2009 pace.

Beef muscle cuts are off to a particularly strong start in 2010, increasing 22 percent in volume to 156,947 metric tons (346 million pounds) for the quarter. The increase in value was even higher, up 24 percent to $678 million. The combined beef/beef variety meat totals are also impressive, rising 11 percent in volume (to 225,122 metric tons or 496.3 million pounds) and 14 percent in value (to $788.5 million). Total beef exports accounted for 10.6 percent of overall production in March compared to 9.4 percent in March 2009. Export value per steer and heifer slaughtered equated to $127.40, compared to $110.67 last year.

Pork muscle cut exports pulled ahead of their 2009 pace by one percent in volume (356,297 metric tons or 785.5 million pounds) and two percent in value ($941.9 million). Combined pork/pork variety meat totals are slightly behind last year in both volume (468,793 metric tons or one billion pounds) and value ($1.11 billion).

On a positive note, the value of total pork exports in March edged up one percent compared to March 2009, and it was 18 percent ahead of the value of pork exports in March 2008, a record-setting year for U.S. pork exports.

Pork exports accounted for 22.5 percent of total production compared to 25 percent in March 2009, but muscle cut exports accounted for 19 percent of production, the same as one year ago. Per-head pork export value equated to $39.80 – which is down about $1 from March 2009.

The results for both beef and pork exports were achieved despite significant declines in each of their leading value markets. Beef exports to Mexico continue to struggle due to weakness in Mexico’s economy. Though beef muscle cut exports managed to pull within seven percent in volume and 10 percent in value of their 2009 pace, variety meat exports to Mexico are still down dramatically.

Pork exports to Japan – which exceeded $1.5 billion in each of the last two calendar years – have slowed due to unusually high inventories of domestic pork. Muscle cut exports to Japan are within 13 percent in volume and 11 percent in value of last year’s pace. But while variety meat makes up only a small portion of the U.S. pork shipped to Japan, those exports are down 62 percent in volume and 46 percent in value.

U.S. beef and pork muscle cut exports performed well in March, concluding the first quarter of 2010 with increasing momentum. A sluggish global market for variety meat held down the overall totals, but muscle cut export value for both products are running ahead of their 2009 pace.

Beef muscle cuts are off to a particularly strong start in 2010, increasing 22 percent in volume to 156,947 metric tons (346 million pounds) for the quarter. The increase in value was even higher, up 24 percent to $678 million. The combined beef/beef variety meat totals are also impressive, rising 11 percent in volume (to 225,122 metric tons or 496.3 million pounds) and 14 percent in value (to $788.5 million). Total beef exports accounted for 10.6 percent of overall production in March compared to 9.4 percent in March 2009. Export value per steer and heifer slaughtered equated to $127.40, compared to $110.67 last year.

Pork muscle cut exports pulled ahead of their 2009 pace by one percent in volume (356,297 metric tons or 785.5 million pounds) and two percent in value ($941.9 million). Combined pork/pork variety meat totals are slightly behind last year in both volume (468,793 metric tons or one billion pounds) and value ($1.11 billion).

On a positive note, the value of total pork exports in March edged up one percent compared to March 2009, and it was 18 percent ahead of the value of pork exports in March 2008, a record-setting year for U.S. pork exports.

Pork exports accounted for 22.5 percent of total production compared to 25 percent in March 2009, but muscle cut exports accounted for 19 percent of production, the same as one year ago. Per-head pork export value equated to $39.80 – which is down about $1 from March 2009.

The results for both beef and pork exports were achieved despite significant declines in each of their leading value markets. Beef exports to Mexico continue to struggle due to weakness in Mexico’s economy. Though beef muscle cut exports managed to pull within seven percent in volume and 10 percent in value of their 2009 pace, variety meat exports to Mexico are still down dramatically.

Pork exports to Japan – which exceeded $1.5 billion in each of the last two calendar years – have slowed due to unusually high inventories of domestic pork. Muscle cut exports to Japan are within 13 percent in volume and 11 percent in value of last year’s pace. But while variety meat makes up only a small portion of the U.S. pork shipped to Japan, those exports are down 62 percent in volume and 46 percent in value.

U.S. beef and pork muscle cut exports performed well in March, concluding the first quarter of 2010 with increasing momentum. A sluggish global market for variety meat held down the overall totals, but muscle cut export value for both products are running ahead of their 2009 pace.

Beef muscle cuts are off to a particularly strong start in 2010, increasing 22 percent in volume to 156,947 metric tons (346 million pounds) for the quarter. The increase in value was even higher, up 24 percent to $678 million. The combined beef/beef variety meat totals are also impressive, rising 11 percent in volume (to 225,122 metric tons or 496.3 million pounds) and 14 percent in value (to $788.5 million). Total beef exports accounted for 10.6 percent of overall production in March compared to 9.4 percent in March 2009. Export value per steer and heifer slaughtered equated to $127.40, compared to $110.67 last year.

Pork muscle cut exports pulled ahead of their 2009 pace by one percent in volume (356,297 metric tons or 785.5 million pounds) and two percent in value ($941.9 million). Combined pork/pork variety meat totals are slightly behind last year in both volume (468,793 metric tons or one billion pounds) and value ($1.11 billion).

On a positive note, the value of total pork exports in March edged up one percent compared to March 2009, and it was 18 percent ahead of the value of pork exports in March 2008, a record-setting year for U.S. pork exports.

Pork exports accounted for 22.5 percent of total production compared to 25 percent in March 2009, but muscle cut exports accounted for 19 percent of production, the same as one year ago. Per-head pork export value equated to $39.80 – which is down about $1 from March 2009.

The results for both beef and pork exports were achieved despite significant declines in each of their leading value markets. Beef exports to Mexico continue to struggle due to weakness in Mexico’s economy. Though beef muscle cut exports managed to pull within seven percent in volume and 10 percent in value of their 2009 pace, variety meat exports to Mexico are still down dramatically.

Pork exports to Japan – which exceeded $1.5 billion in each of the last two calendar years – have slowed due to unusually high inventories of domestic pork. Muscle cut exports to Japan are within 13 percent in volume and 11 percent in value of last year’s pace. But while variety meat makes up only a small portion of the U.S. pork shipped to Japan, those exports are down 62 percent in volume and 46 percent in value.

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