Using DNA technology to profile genetic potential in cattle | TSLN.com

Using DNA technology to profile genetic potential in cattle

Today’s cattle business is all about data collection. Flip through any sale catalog these days and you’ll find a wealth of information: expected progeny differences (EPDs) for everything from performance traits to docility; ultrasound data measuring carcass traits like marbling and ribeye area; and the traditional numbers like birth, weaning and yearling weights and average daily gain.

These figures provide a benchmark for ranchers as they make purchases on herd sires, replacement heifers and feeder calves. Yet, are all these numbers enough to make accurate decisions to improve genetic traits and ultimately the producer’s bottom-line?

Zac Hall, senior sales representative for Igenity™, a division of Merial Animal Health, says the next step for producers is the use of DNA technology to profile genetic potential in cattle.

“Igenity is a tool used by ranchers who want to produce beef for a specific end-point,” Hall explains. “I work with both seedstock producers and commercial cattlemen, and DNA testing kits provide information they can’t get anywhere else.”

Today’s cattle business is all about data collection. Flip through any sale catalog these days and you’ll find a wealth of information: expected progeny differences (EPDs) for everything from performance traits to docility; ultrasound data measuring carcass traits like marbling and ribeye area; and the traditional numbers like birth, weaning and yearling weights and average daily gain.

These figures provide a benchmark for ranchers as they make purchases on herd sires, replacement heifers and feeder calves. Yet, are all these numbers enough to make accurate decisions to improve genetic traits and ultimately the producer’s bottom-line?

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Zac Hall, senior sales representative for Igenity™, a division of Merial Animal Health, says the next step for producers is the use of DNA technology to profile genetic potential in cattle.

“Igenity is a tool used by ranchers who want to produce beef for a specific end-point,” Hall explains. “I work with both seedstock producers and commercial cattlemen, and DNA testing kits provide information they can’t get anywhere else.”

Today’s cattle business is all about data collection. Flip through any sale catalog these days and you’ll find a wealth of information: expected progeny differences (EPDs) for everything from performance traits to docility; ultrasound data measuring carcass traits like marbling and ribeye area; and the traditional numbers like birth, weaning and yearling weights and average daily gain.

These figures provide a benchmark for ranchers as they make purchases on herd sires, replacement heifers and feeder calves. Yet, are all these numbers enough to make accurate decisions to improve genetic traits and ultimately the producer’s bottom-line?

Zac Hall, senior sales representative for Igenity™, a division of Merial Animal Health, says the next step for producers is the use of DNA technology to profile genetic potential in cattle.

“Igenity is a tool used by ranchers who want to produce beef for a specific end-point,” Hall explains. “I work with both seedstock producers and commercial cattlemen, and DNA testing kits provide information they can’t get anywhere else.”

Today’s cattle business is all about data collection. Flip through any sale catalog these days and you’ll find a wealth of information: expected progeny differences (EPDs) for everything from performance traits to docility; ultrasound data measuring carcass traits like marbling and ribeye area; and the traditional numbers like birth, weaning and yearling weights and average daily gain.

These figures provide a benchmark for ranchers as they make purchases on herd sires, replacement heifers and feeder calves. Yet, are all these numbers enough to make accurate decisions to improve genetic traits and ultimately the producer’s bottom-line?

Zac Hall, senior sales representative for Igenity™, a division of Merial Animal Health, says the next step for producers is the use of DNA technology to profile genetic potential in cattle.

“Igenity is a tool used by ranchers who want to produce beef for a specific end-point,” Hall explains. “I work with both seedstock producers and commercial cattlemen, and DNA testing kits provide information they can’t get anywhere else.”

Today’s cattle business is all about data collection. Flip through any sale catalog these days and you’ll find a wealth of information: expected progeny differences (EPDs) for everything from performance traits to docility; ultrasound data measuring carcass traits like marbling and ribeye area; and the traditional numbers like birth, weaning and yearling weights and average daily gain.

These figures provide a benchmark for ranchers as they make purchases on herd sires, replacement heifers and feeder calves. Yet, are all these numbers enough to make accurate decisions to improve genetic traits and ultimately the producer’s bottom-line?

Zac Hall, senior sales representative for Igenity™, a division of Merial Animal Health, says the next step for producers is the use of DNA technology to profile genetic potential in cattle.

“Igenity is a tool used by ranchers who want to produce beef for a specific end-point,” Hall explains. “I work with both seedstock producers and commercial cattlemen, and DNA testing kits provide information they can’t get anywhere else.”

Today’s cattle business is all about data collection. Flip through any sale catalog these days and you’ll find a wealth of information: expected progeny differences (EPDs) for everything from performance traits to docility; ultrasound data measuring carcass traits like marbling and ribeye area; and the traditional numbers like birth, weaning and yearling weights and average daily gain.

These figures provide a benchmark for ranchers as they make purchases on herd sires, replacement heifers and feeder calves. Yet, are all these numbers enough to make accurate decisions to improve genetic traits and ultimately the producer’s bottom-line?

Zac Hall, senior sales representative for Igenity™, a division of Merial Animal Health, says the next step for producers is the use of DNA technology to profile genetic potential in cattle.

“Igenity is a tool used by ranchers who want to produce beef for a specific end-point,” Hall explains. “I work with both seedstock producers and commercial cattlemen, and DNA testing kits provide information they can’t get anywhere else.”

editor’s note: for more information, visit http://www.igenity.com. producers can also locate a regional sales representative by calling 1-877-igenity (443-6489).

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