Veteran Harold Bawdon shows his patriotism, conservation | TSLN.com

Veteran Harold Bawdon shows his patriotism, conservation

PIERRE, SD (NRCS) – Life-long rancher and Navy and Marine Corps Veteran Harold Bawdon has added a visible symbol of the pride and honor he feels for his country to the conservation work being done on his ranch in Hyde County (SD).

Born and raised in Hyde County, Harold Bawdon heeded the call of duty when World War II began. As homecoming King, Harold Bawdon was a leader and he continued to show his leadership as he enlisted in the Navy, Aug. 5, 1942. Early in his service career, Harold was accepted as a Naval Cadet and was commissioned on Feb. 29, 1944 as Second Lieutenant receiving his Wings of Honor.

Bawdon then transferred to the Marine Corps and excelled while serving as a pilot, receiving every rating for land or sea during his tour of duty. After his years of service, Harold and his wife, Patricia (Pat) returned to the family ranch in 1947. Captain Harold Bawdon remained in the Marine Air Reserves and was recalled during the Korean Conflict. He continued to support our great nation and received many honors and medals during his almost 12 years of service to his country.

In 1953, Harold Bawdon returned home with an honorable discharge. He has continued to be a leader in his community and put his heart into the family farm that he and his wife purchased from his parents. Harold and Pat bought more land to the south and continue to ranch on the Century Farm.

It is with that same passion and commitment Harold set forth to make his land more healthy and sustainable. Harold has a love for trees; NRCS and a local conservation district helped him do a big shelterbelt renovation around the headquarters of his ranch. Every year, employees report, Harold comes into the district office to purchase “hand-plant” trees to enhance his operation. He also reminds them: “You know, you just have to keep your trees clean.”

Working closely with local employees, Harold was doing conservation planning with NRCS on his over 2,000-acre cow-calf ranching operation. “He has always kept his pastures in good condition,” said Laura Anderson, NRCS Soil Conservation Technician, Highmore, SD. Harold is a character and it is fun to see more conservation happen on the Bawdon place.

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His love for our country and his proud, independent character is how the “stars and stripes” came to be displayed in his pasture.

Previously, Harold relied on dams and dugouts for his water source. Then, in 2003 working closely with NRCS staff, Harold started working toward his lifetime goal of getting dependable water to the livestock in his pastures. To help with livestock distribution in his grazing rotation, NRCS helped Bawdon install an artesian well with assistance through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). The theme fence shown in the photograph protects the wellhead. Through EQIP, Bawdon also installed two miles of buried pipeline and five tanks. This water development services 900 acres of native grazing land. He also can use above ground pipeline as needed to provide water to other pastures on his ranch.

Former District Conservationist Sarah Eggebo, now with NRCS in Belle Fourche, SD, said, “It was great working with Harold on this EQIP project. He kept talking that he was going to paint the guardrail as the American flag. We asked him to let us know when it was done so we could get a picture. It is really good to work with producers who are grateful for what NRCS does to assist them – that is what makes the job fun and rewarding,” she said.

Over the years, NRCS employees have enjoyed working with Harold. Bawdon has stated that he is very pleased, actually ecstatic, he proclaims, with his accomplishments in conservation and the assistance he has received through NRCS. “I’m proud of what NRCS has done to help me. Mission completed!”

PIERRE, SD (NRCS) – Life-long rancher and Navy and Marine Corps Veteran Harold Bawdon has added a visible symbol of the pride and honor he feels for his country to the conservation work being done on his ranch in Hyde County (SD).

Born and raised in Hyde County, Harold Bawdon heeded the call of duty when World War II began. As homecoming King, Harold Bawdon was a leader and he continued to show his leadership as he enlisted in the Navy, Aug. 5, 1942. Early in his service career, Harold was accepted as a Naval Cadet and was commissioned on Feb. 29, 1944 as Second Lieutenant receiving his Wings of Honor.

Bawdon then transferred to the Marine Corps and excelled while serving as a pilot, receiving every rating for land or sea during his tour of duty. After his years of service, Harold and his wife, Patricia (Pat) returned to the family ranch in 1947. Captain Harold Bawdon remained in the Marine Air Reserves and was recalled during the Korean Conflict. He continued to support our great nation and received many honors and medals during his almost 12 years of service to his country.

In 1953, Harold Bawdon returned home with an honorable discharge. He has continued to be a leader in his community and put his heart into the family farm that he and his wife purchased from his parents. Harold and Pat bought more land to the south and continue to ranch on the Century Farm.

It is with that same passion and commitment Harold set forth to make his land more healthy and sustainable. Harold has a love for trees; NRCS and a local conservation district helped him do a big shelterbelt renovation around the headquarters of his ranch. Every year, employees report, Harold comes into the district office to purchase “hand-plant” trees to enhance his operation. He also reminds them: “You know, you just have to keep your trees clean.”

Working closely with local employees, Harold was doing conservation planning with NRCS on his over 2,000-acre cow-calf ranching operation. “He has always kept his pastures in good condition,” said Laura Anderson, NRCS Soil Conservation Technician, Highmore, SD. Harold is a character and it is fun to see more conservation happen on the Bawdon place.

His love for our country and his proud, independent character is how the “stars and stripes” came to be displayed in his pasture.

Previously, Harold relied on dams and dugouts for his water source. Then, in 2003 working closely with NRCS staff, Harold started working toward his lifetime goal of getting dependable water to the livestock in his pastures. To help with livestock distribution in his grazing rotation, NRCS helped Bawdon install an artesian well with assistance through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). The theme fence shown in the photograph protects the wellhead. Through EQIP, Bawdon also installed two miles of buried pipeline and five tanks. This water development services 900 acres of native grazing land. He also can use above ground pipeline as needed to provide water to other pastures on his ranch.

Former District Conservationist Sarah Eggebo, now with NRCS in Belle Fourche, SD, said, “It was great working with Harold on this EQIP project. He kept talking that he was going to paint the guardrail as the American flag. We asked him to let us know when it was done so we could get a picture. It is really good to work with producers who are grateful for what NRCS does to assist them – that is what makes the job fun and rewarding,” she said.

Over the years, NRCS employees have enjoyed working with Harold. Bawdon has stated that he is very pleased, actually ecstatic, he proclaims, with his accomplishments in conservation and the assistance he has received through NRCS. “I’m proud of what NRCS has done to help me. Mission completed!”

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