Victor Cortese: Controlling viral diseases in cattle | TSLN.com

Victor Cortese: Controlling viral diseases in cattle

“What does it cost a producer to have a sick or dead calf?”

This question was posed by Victor Cortese, DVM, Ph.D., director of cattle immunology for Pfizer Animal Health at the 2011 Mid-Winter Veterinary Retreat held in Deadwood, SD on Jan. 19-21.

Cortese said a sick calf that is treated once will cost, on average, $40.64. The second treatment will bump the cost up to $58.35, and for a calf getting treated three or more times, it can cost producers more than $291.93 in comparison to an untreated calf.

“Calves that get pneumonia one time and respond to treatment are still affected for the rest of their life,” explained Cortese. “The illness will impact weight gains for an average of one-half pound a day, and these calves are considered to be successes. However, they are more likely to be culled or die from one or more case of pneumonia. As a result, controlling pneumonia in a younger calf becomes incredibly important for performance down the road.”

Cortese noted that pneumonia impacts weaning weights, feedlot performance, milk production and even reproduction rates.

“In a young calf where the local immune system is still developing, this is when we get scours, pneumonia, etc., and this will impact them throughout their lifetimes,” said Cortese. “These factors hurt the immune system leading to more diseases such as Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) and coccidia. It also impacts development and aging. From the time that an animal is stressed to the time they are functioning again normally, it typically takes three weeks. This leaves the calf more susceptible to additional health problems.”

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According to Cortese, BRD continues to be a major cause of economic loss to beef producers. Even one required treatment for pneumonia can have a significant economic impact and may be the difference between profit and loss for that individual animal. However, when a calf gets sick, it must be treated. In high stress situations, Cortese said intranasal vaccinations work best.

“Intranasal vaccinations are the best option for treatment because they quickly hit local immune systems,” said Cortese. “This stimulates a faster and stronger immune response.”

Cortese noted that a second intranasal dose will drive immunity of the calf even higher. He explained that ultimately, prior vaccination or exposure to pathogens heightens and speeds up the process and can dramatically increase defense mechanisms in the respiratory system.

“What does it cost a producer to have a sick or dead calf?”

This question was posed by Victor Cortese, DVM, Ph.D., director of cattle immunology for Pfizer Animal Health at the 2011 Mid-Winter Veterinary Retreat held in Deadwood, SD on Jan. 19-21.

Cortese said a sick calf that is treated once will cost, on average, $40.64. The second treatment will bump the cost up to $58.35, and for a calf getting treated three or more times, it can cost producers more than $291.93 in comparison to an untreated calf.

“Calves that get pneumonia one time and respond to treatment are still affected for the rest of their life,” explained Cortese. “The illness will impact weight gains for an average of one-half pound a day, and these calves are considered to be successes. However, they are more likely to be culled or die from one or more case of pneumonia. As a result, controlling pneumonia in a younger calf becomes incredibly important for performance down the road.”

Cortese noted that pneumonia impacts weaning weights, feedlot performance, milk production and even reproduction rates.

“In a young calf where the local immune system is still developing, this is when we get scours, pneumonia, etc., and this will impact them throughout their lifetimes,” said Cortese. “These factors hurt the immune system leading to more diseases such as Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) and coccidia. It also impacts development and aging. From the time that an animal is stressed to the time they are functioning again normally, it typically takes three weeks. This leaves the calf more susceptible to additional health problems.”

According to Cortese, BRD continues to be a major cause of economic loss to beef producers. Even one required treatment for pneumonia can have a significant economic impact and may be the difference between profit and loss for that individual animal. However, when a calf gets sick, it must be treated. In high stress situations, Cortese said intranasal vaccinations work best.

“Intranasal vaccinations are the best option for treatment because they quickly hit local immune systems,” said Cortese. “This stimulates a faster and stronger immune response.”

Cortese noted that a second intranasal dose will drive immunity of the calf even higher. He explained that ultimately, prior vaccination or exposure to pathogens heightens and speeds up the process and can dramatically increase defense mechanisms in the respiratory system.

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