Weather favors wheat crops | TSLN.com

Weather favors wheat crops

Bryce Anderson

DTN photo by Scott KemperWheat areas have avoided any new late-summer threats.

OMAHA (DTN) – Argentina’s dryness, central Asia’s crop moisture shortages and Australia’s El Nino worries are the chief concerns regarding wheat going into August.

But considering wheat is a durable crop that’s harvested somewhere in the world every month, these are minor worries.

The weather has been favorable for spring wheat thus far, and that favorable trend is likely to continue. “The spring wheat belt has had just enough heat to bring crops along at a good pace,” DTN Ag Meteorologist Mike Palmerino said. “But it hasn’t been very hot for very long, and that’s helped to keep stress levels down.”

In its July crop estimates, USDA pegged total hard red spring wheat production at 506.4 million bushels, a harvest that’s only one percent less than 2008’s 511.5 mb. USDA estimates the 2009 hard red spring wheat yield for all U.S. production areas at 38.3 bushels per acre.

Spring wheat got off to a slow start, due to last spring’s flooding affecting field work and planting. But wheat has made an impressive recovery. As of July 27, 93 percent of the spring wheat crop was headed –only five percentage points behind average.

North Dakota, Minnesota and Montana showed only a small lag in heading: North Dakota’s heading rate of 92 percent trailed the state’s five-year average by six percentage points, Minnesota’s 93 percent lagged the average by five percentage points and Montana’s 91 percent was five percentage points behind the average.

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OMAHA (DTN) – Argentina’s dryness, central Asia’s crop moisture shortages and Australia’s El Nino worries are the chief concerns regarding wheat going into August.

But considering wheat is a durable crop that’s harvested somewhere in the world every month, these are minor worries.

The weather has been favorable for spring wheat thus far, and that favorable trend is likely to continue. “The spring wheat belt has had just enough heat to bring crops along at a good pace,” DTN Ag Meteorologist Mike Palmerino said. “But it hasn’t been very hot for very long, and that’s helped to keep stress levels down.”

In its July crop estimates, USDA pegged total hard red spring wheat production at 506.4 million bushels, a harvest that’s only one percent less than 2008’s 511.5 mb. USDA estimates the 2009 hard red spring wheat yield for all U.S. production areas at 38.3 bushels per acre.

Spring wheat got off to a slow start, due to last spring’s flooding affecting field work and planting. But wheat has made an impressive recovery. As of July 27, 93 percent of the spring wheat crop was headed –only five percentage points behind average.

North Dakota, Minnesota and Montana showed only a small lag in heading: North Dakota’s heading rate of 92 percent trailed the state’s five-year average by six percentage points, Minnesota’s 93 percent lagged the average by five percentage points and Montana’s 91 percent was five percentage points behind the average.

OMAHA (DTN) – Argentina’s dryness, central Asia’s crop moisture shortages and Australia’s El Nino worries are the chief concerns regarding wheat going into August.

But considering wheat is a durable crop that’s harvested somewhere in the world every month, these are minor worries.

The weather has been favorable for spring wheat thus far, and that favorable trend is likely to continue. “The spring wheat belt has had just enough heat to bring crops along at a good pace,” DTN Ag Meteorologist Mike Palmerino said. “But it hasn’t been very hot for very long, and that’s helped to keep stress levels down.”

In its July crop estimates, USDA pegged total hard red spring wheat production at 506.4 million bushels, a harvest that’s only one percent less than 2008’s 511.5 mb. USDA estimates the 2009 hard red spring wheat yield for all U.S. production areas at 38.3 bushels per acre.

Spring wheat got off to a slow start, due to last spring’s flooding affecting field work and planting. But wheat has made an impressive recovery. As of July 27, 93 percent of the spring wheat crop was headed –only five percentage points behind average.

North Dakota, Minnesota and Montana showed only a small lag in heading: North Dakota’s heading rate of 92 percent trailed the state’s five-year average by six percentage points, Minnesota’s 93 percent lagged the average by five percentage points and Montana’s 91 percent was five percentage points behind the average.

OMAHA (DTN) – Argentina’s dryness, central Asia’s crop moisture shortages and Australia’s El Nino worries are the chief concerns regarding wheat going into August.

But considering wheat is a durable crop that’s harvested somewhere in the world every month, these are minor worries.

The weather has been favorable for spring wheat thus far, and that favorable trend is likely to continue. “The spring wheat belt has had just enough heat to bring crops along at a good pace,” DTN Ag Meteorologist Mike Palmerino said. “But it hasn’t been very hot for very long, and that’s helped to keep stress levels down.”

In its July crop estimates, USDA pegged total hard red spring wheat production at 506.4 million bushels, a harvest that’s only one percent less than 2008’s 511.5 mb. USDA estimates the 2009 hard red spring wheat yield for all U.S. production areas at 38.3 bushels per acre.

Spring wheat got off to a slow start, due to last spring’s flooding affecting field work and planting. But wheat has made an impressive recovery. As of July 27, 93 percent of the spring wheat crop was headed –only five percentage points behind average.

North Dakota, Minnesota and Montana showed only a small lag in heading: North Dakota’s heading rate of 92 percent trailed the state’s five-year average by six percentage points, Minnesota’s 93 percent lagged the average by five percentage points and Montana’s 91 percent was five percentage points behind the average.

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