Wildlife advocates seek to halt slaughter of brucellosis-positive Yellowstone bison | TSLN.com

Wildlife advocates seek to halt slaughter of brucellosis-positive Yellowstone bison

Wildlife advocates Thursday, Feb. 3, asked a Montana federal judge to halt the impending shipment-to-slaughter of many of the hundreds of bison captured last week as they migrated out of Yellowstone National Park. The request for a temporary injunction and restraining order would prevent the National Park Service and other federal agencies from sending to slaughter bison that test positive for brucellosis.

More than 300 hundred bison left the snowed-in park in recent days searching for food. They were turned back by park workers and others to prevent any contact between the bison and livestock. About half of the Yellowstone’s estimated 3,900 bison have been exposed to the disease, although the rate of active infection is lower.

News reports say there have been no recorded cattle-to-bison disease transmissions, and there are few cattle in the park’s immediate vicinity. The wildlife advocates claim these conditions should permit government agencies to ease their restrictions on where bison can move.

Wildlife advocates Thursday, Feb. 3, asked a Montana federal judge to halt the impending shipment-to-slaughter of many of the hundreds of bison captured last week as they migrated out of Yellowstone National Park. The request for a temporary injunction and restraining order would prevent the National Park Service and other federal agencies from sending to slaughter bison that test positive for brucellosis.

More than 300 hundred bison left the snowed-in park in recent days searching for food. They were turned back by park workers and others to prevent any contact between the bison and livestock. About half of the Yellowstone’s estimated 3,900 bison have been exposed to the disease, although the rate of active infection is lower.

News reports say there have been no recorded cattle-to-bison disease transmissions, and there are few cattle in the park’s immediate vicinity. The wildlife advocates claim these conditions should permit government agencies to ease their restrictions on where bison can move.

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