Would you like to ride the historic Fort Pierre to Deadwood trail? | TSLN.com

Would you like to ride the historic Fort Pierre to Deadwood trail?

LR Wendt

The non-profit Verendrye Museum Association of Fort Pierre, SD is sponsoring a historic trail ride scheduled to begin with a parade in Fort Pierre on July 30 and conclude with a parade and celebration in Deadwood, SD on Aug. 15 of 2008.

In between there will 14 days of driving, camping, resting, history relevant entertainment and friendship. This trail ride will retrace, as closely as possible, the 125 year old trail. This event will honor and commemorate the 100th anniversary of the closing of the trail in 1908.

The Association has limited the number of participants to 300 applicants. At this writing, 160 applications have been accepted. We urge those interested in receiving an application, to please contact the Fort Pierre Economic Development Corporation at 605-223-7603 or Verendrye Association Co-Chairmen, Chuck Poches at 605-223-2073 or Darby Nutter at 605-223-3100.

In 1875 after the Custer expedition announced the discovery of gold in the Black Hills, the news unleashed a migration of prospectors, miners, landsharks, crooks, gamblers and gals to the gulches, ravines and streams throughout the Black Hills. By 1878, realizing the growing need for essential supplies, several entrepreneurs began forming large transportation companies.

Deadwood became the terminal, as wagon trains and stagecoaches from Cheyenne, WY, Sidney, MT, Bismarck and Medora, ND, and Miles City, MT converged on the narrow gulch. Eventually, the Fort Pierre Trail – because of its shorter distance and access to the Missouri river and the railroad by 1881 – transported the majority of goods and supplies.

Steamships and railway trains brought tons of supplies to Fort Pierre which were quickly loaded onto waiting ox and mule trains. Necessary supplies of every description – including barrels of whiskey and beer – were sold in Deadwood and the many mining camps, paid for by a pinch or two of gold dust. By 1878 an estimated 235 thriving saloons were scattered within the many gulches.

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The non-profit Verendrye Museum Association of Fort Pierre, SD is sponsoring a historic trail ride scheduled to begin with a parade in Fort Pierre on July 30 and conclude with a parade and celebration in Deadwood, SD on Aug. 15 of 2008.

In between there will 14 days of driving, camping, resting, history relevant entertainment and friendship. This trail ride will retrace, as closely as possible, the 125 year old trail. This event will honor and commemorate the 100th anniversary of the closing of the trail in 1908.

The Association has limited the number of participants to 300 applicants. At this writing, 160 applications have been accepted. We urge those interested in receiving an application, to please contact the Fort Pierre Economic Development Corporation at 605-223-7603 or Verendrye Association Co-Chairmen, Chuck Poches at 605-223-2073 or Darby Nutter at 605-223-3100.

In 1875 after the Custer expedition announced the discovery of gold in the Black Hills, the news unleashed a migration of prospectors, miners, landsharks, crooks, gamblers and gals to the gulches, ravines and streams throughout the Black Hills. By 1878, realizing the growing need for essential supplies, several entrepreneurs began forming large transportation companies.

Deadwood became the terminal, as wagon trains and stagecoaches from Cheyenne, WY, Sidney, MT, Bismarck and Medora, ND, and Miles City, MT converged on the narrow gulch. Eventually, the Fort Pierre Trail – because of its shorter distance and access to the Missouri river and the railroad by 1881 – transported the majority of goods and supplies.

Steamships and railway trains brought tons of supplies to Fort Pierre which were quickly loaded onto waiting ox and mule trains. Necessary supplies of every description – including barrels of whiskey and beer – were sold in Deadwood and the many mining camps, paid for by a pinch or two of gold dust. By 1878 an estimated 235 thriving saloons were scattered within the many gulches.

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