Wrangler NFR Round 7 results, averages | TSLN.com

Wrangler NFR Round 7 results, averages

LAS VEGAS – Fellow bull riders and steer wrestlers beware: two-time World Champions J.W. Harris and Luke Branquinho are red hot.

Harris, of Mullin, TX, won the bull riding for the third straight night at the 2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo and for the fourth time in seven rounds, and Branquinho won for the third time – and second in a row – in front of 17,132 at the Thomas & Mack Center. Both cowboys took over the top spots in their respective events thanks to their Round 7 victories at the $5.875 million rodeo.

Harris’ win came thanks to a rodeo-best 94.5-point ride aboard Frontier Rodeo’s Smoke Screen, and he is the only bull rider to have covered six bulls at this year’s Finals. Wrangler NFR rookie Tyler Smith was second in Round 7 with a score of 89 points.

He has now earned $92,644 – the second most of any of the 119 contestants – in Las Vegas this year and is riding high.

“It’s the highest score I’ve had at the Finals and third-highest I’ve ever been,” said Harris, who leads the Wrangler NFR average by 117.5 points over Cody Whitney. “I’ve had a good Finals, but I just have to keep moving forward. I’ve come here to win the gold buckle. That’s what I’m after.”

Harris has $180,447 in total season earnings, $15,939 ahead of 2007 World Champion Wesley Silcox, who led the world standings through Round 6.

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Branquinho, of Los Alamos, CA, took over the No. 1 spot in the PRCA World Standings in the process. Branquinho, who won world titles in 2004 and 2008, won Round 7 with a rodeo-best 3.3-second run, one-tenth of a second faster than Trevor Knowles and two-tenths of a second faster than Cody Cassidy.

He also won a share of first place in Round 2 and took Round 6. Branquinho now leads the PRCA World Standings with $143,667 after earning an event-best $53,525, while Knowles moved from fifth to second with $130,035 thanks to his runner-up finish.

Round 7 was an exciting one in the steer wrestling, with the lead changing three times in the last four runs. Branquinho was last to nod his head, and he made the most of it.

“It was really exciting, especially when you’re last out and 3.4 is winning the round,” Branquinho said. “I wasn’t trying to beat 3.4; I was just trying to back in there and make a good run. Luckily for me, I had the steer they won the first and fourth rounds on, so I knew I had a chance. But, at this stage, I was just trying to get a good start and make a good run.”

Wednesday night was a good time to be from Louisiana, as Heflin, LA, brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss shared the saddle bronc riding win and Sulphur, LA, tie-down roper Shane Hanchey won the tie-down roping.

Cody and Heith DeMoss had matching 87.5-point rides en route to the first-place tie. Cody DeMoss, the elder of the two, rode Burch Rodeo’s Friendly Fire to his $15,676 check, while Heith DeMoss earned the same check for his mark on Diamond G Rodeo’s Marla’s Rose.

“Shoot, battling with this son-of-a-gun day in and day out, it’s good to finally to tie him,” said Heith DeMoss, who crossed the $100,000 mark in season earnings ($112,817) thanks to the tie for the win. “And to do it at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo is heck of a feat. I’m glad to be here with him. It’s an awesome deal.”

It was Heith DeMoss’ third check of the 2010 Wrangler NFR, while his older brother has now cashed in four rounds.

“Winning the round here is amazing anyway, because you beat the Top 15 in the world, but to tie your brother for the round is so cool,” said Cody DeMoss, who is third in the Wrangler NFR average standings. “We have dreamed about something like this growing up and in our whole careers. We always both want to win it, but to split it with my brother is beyond my wildest dreams.”

The saddle bronc riding has developed into a two-man race between Wade Sundell and 2008 World Champion Cody Wright. Wright leads the world with $174,989 and leads the Wrangler NFR average with 597 points on seven head, and Sundell is right on his heels with $171,854 and a second-place ranking in the average with 594.

Wrangler NFR rookie Hanchey won the tie-down roping with a 7.6-second run, five-tenths of a second ahead of two-time World Champion Tie-Down Roper Trevor Brazile. It was Hanchey’s first round win and fourth check of the rodeo thus far, and he stands sixth in the world and fourth in the Wrangler NFR average standings.

Hanchey said he had a good feeling about his run, especially after seeing the DeMoss brothers take their victory lap.

“When they said 8.1, I said, ‘This is my round,'” said Hanchey, of Sulphur, LA. “I had the calf to do it – Trevor had won the round on that calf before – so I knew it was mine for the taking. When the DeMoss brothers split the bronc riding, that was God telling me, ‘This is your night.'”

Brazile’s runner-up finish pushed his lead in the tie-down roping world standings over his brother-in-law Tuf Cooper to more than $25,000, and he stands third in the Wrangler NFR average. Cooper is second in the average, which is led by seven-time World Champion Tie-Down Roper Fred Whitfield, who is fifth in the world standings.

In the bareback riding, three-time and reigning World Champion Bobby Mote broke through for a round victory after spurring Classic Pro Rodeo’s Cimmaron for 85.5 points. That score left the Culver, OR, cowboy a half-point ahead of Clint Cannon and added another $17,512 to his bottom line.

Mote, who finished second in the first two rounds, was happy to get along so well with a horse that was new to him.

“I had a horse I’d never seen or heard of before, and I was kind of glad because a lot of the ones I’ve had this week that haven’t been as good were ones I’d both seen and heard of. So, having one I didn’t know, I really didn’t have much of a game plan. I just wanted to go make a good ride, and the horse was really good.”

The final three rounds in the bareback riding will be a shootout, as world standings leader Steven Dent is only $32,097 ahead of Mote, who is fifth in the world. Mote is tied for second in the Wrangler NFR average, while Dent is tied for sixth.

Team roping was a tight battle in Round 7, with seven-tenths of a second separating first from sixth place. The team of Brady Tryan and Jake Long won their second round of the 10-day event with a 3.9-second run, one-tenth of a second ahead of three teams: Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, Keven Daniel/Caleb Twisselman and Ty Blasingame/Cody Hintz.

“It’s a blast,” Tryan said of roping at his first Wrangler NFR. “Our goal was to come here and win as much as we could. We’ve already done better than we could have counted on, being two first-timers here. We’re just going to stick with the plan to win as much as we can every night, and see where it takes us.”

Tryan and Long may be Wrangler NFR rookies, but they are in the world-title hunt, standing fifth in the world and third in the Wrangler NFR average.

“We’re just having a great time out here,” Long said. “It’s been better than we could have expected. It’s been like a dream. We didn’t think we liked the steer we had tonight. They were no-time on him the first two times he went. He tries to run to the right out of the chute. We talked about it before the rodeo and decided I would be really aggressive about hazing him to try to keep him running straight.”

The barrel racing went to two-time World Champion Sherry Cervi, who stopped the clock in 13.70 seconds to finish three-tenths of a second quicker than 2008 World Champion Lindsay Sears. Lisa Lockhart – who has earned an event-best $68,165 after placing in six of the first seven rounds – finished third in the round in 13.93 seconds.

Cervi, who also won Round 3, has placed in five rounds and earned $58,750 in Las Vegas thus far.

“It’s been a really great barrel racing this week,” said Cervi, who is riding her 8-year-old Palomino mare Stingray. “In barrel racing, it’s all about your horse, and I’m grateful to be able to ride her. At any time, anybody can win a round here. There’s pressure because I want to win $17,000 ($17,512) every night. I want to win as much money as I can.”

Cervi’s $238,602 in earnings this season is $84,968 shy of Sears’ single-season earnings record from 2008 with three rounds and the average payout remaining.

LAS VEGAS – Fellow bull riders and steer wrestlers beware: two-time World Champions J.W. Harris and Luke Branquinho are red hot.

Harris, of Mullin, TX, won the bull riding for the third straight night at the 2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo and for the fourth time in seven rounds, and Branquinho won for the third time – and second in a row – in front of 17,132 at the Thomas & Mack Center. Both cowboys took over the top spots in their respective events thanks to their Round 7 victories at the $5.875 million rodeo.

Harris’ win came thanks to a rodeo-best 94.5-point ride aboard Frontier Rodeo’s Smoke Screen, and he is the only bull rider to have covered six bulls at this year’s Finals. Wrangler NFR rookie Tyler Smith was second in Round 7 with a score of 89 points.

He has now earned $92,644 – the second most of any of the 119 contestants – in Las Vegas this year and is riding high.

“It’s the highest score I’ve had at the Finals and third-highest I’ve ever been,” said Harris, who leads the Wrangler NFR average by 117.5 points over Cody Whitney. “I’ve had a good Finals, but I just have to keep moving forward. I’ve come here to win the gold buckle. That’s what I’m after.”

Harris has $180,447 in total season earnings, $15,939 ahead of 2007 World Champion Wesley Silcox, who led the world standings through Round 6.

Branquinho, of Los Alamos, CA, took over the No. 1 spot in the PRCA World Standings in the process. Branquinho, who won world titles in 2004 and 2008, won Round 7 with a rodeo-best 3.3-second run, one-tenth of a second faster than Trevor Knowles and two-tenths of a second faster than Cody Cassidy.

He also won a share of first place in Round 2 and took Round 6. Branquinho now leads the PRCA World Standings with $143,667 after earning an event-best $53,525, while Knowles moved from fifth to second with $130,035 thanks to his runner-up finish.

Round 7 was an exciting one in the steer wrestling, with the lead changing three times in the last four runs. Branquinho was last to nod his head, and he made the most of it.

“It was really exciting, especially when you’re last out and 3.4 is winning the round,” Branquinho said. “I wasn’t trying to beat 3.4; I was just trying to back in there and make a good run. Luckily for me, I had the steer they won the first and fourth rounds on, so I knew I had a chance. But, at this stage, I was just trying to get a good start and make a good run.”

Wednesday night was a good time to be from Louisiana, as Heflin, LA, brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss shared the saddle bronc riding win and Sulphur, LA, tie-down roper Shane Hanchey won the tie-down roping.

Cody and Heith DeMoss had matching 87.5-point rides en route to the first-place tie. Cody DeMoss, the elder of the two, rode Burch Rodeo’s Friendly Fire to his $15,676 check, while Heith DeMoss earned the same check for his mark on Diamond G Rodeo’s Marla’s Rose.

“Shoot, battling with this son-of-a-gun day in and day out, it’s good to finally to tie him,” said Heith DeMoss, who crossed the $100,000 mark in season earnings ($112,817) thanks to the tie for the win. “And to do it at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo is heck of a feat. I’m glad to be here with him. It’s an awesome deal.”

It was Heith DeMoss’ third check of the 2010 Wrangler NFR, while his older brother has now cashed in four rounds.

“Winning the round here is amazing anyway, because you beat the Top 15 in the world, but to tie your brother for the round is so cool,” said Cody DeMoss, who is third in the Wrangler NFR average standings. “We have dreamed about something like this growing up and in our whole careers. We always both want to win it, but to split it with my brother is beyond my wildest dreams.”

The saddle bronc riding has developed into a two-man race between Wade Sundell and 2008 World Champion Cody Wright. Wright leads the world with $174,989 and leads the Wrangler NFR average with 597 points on seven head, and Sundell is right on his heels with $171,854 and a second-place ranking in the average with 594.

Wrangler NFR rookie Hanchey won the tie-down roping with a 7.6-second run, five-tenths of a second ahead of two-time World Champion Tie-Down Roper Trevor Brazile. It was Hanchey’s first round win and fourth check of the rodeo thus far, and he stands sixth in the world and fourth in the Wrangler NFR average standings.

Hanchey said he had a good feeling about his run, especially after seeing the DeMoss brothers take their victory lap.

“When they said 8.1, I said, ‘This is my round,'” said Hanchey, of Sulphur, LA. “I had the calf to do it – Trevor had won the round on that calf before – so I knew it was mine for the taking. When the DeMoss brothers split the bronc riding, that was God telling me, ‘This is your night.'”

Brazile’s runner-up finish pushed his lead in the tie-down roping world standings over his brother-in-law Tuf Cooper to more than $25,000, and he stands third in the Wrangler NFR average. Cooper is second in the average, which is led by seven-time World Champion Tie-Down Roper Fred Whitfield, who is fifth in the world standings.

In the bareback riding, three-time and reigning World Champion Bobby Mote broke through for a round victory after spurring Classic Pro Rodeo’s Cimmaron for 85.5 points. That score left the Culver, OR, cowboy a half-point ahead of Clint Cannon and added another $17,512 to his bottom line.

Mote, who finished second in the first two rounds, was happy to get along so well with a horse that was new to him.

“I had a horse I’d never seen or heard of before, and I was kind of glad because a lot of the ones I’ve had this week that haven’t been as good were ones I’d both seen and heard of. So, having one I didn’t know, I really didn’t have much of a game plan. I just wanted to go make a good ride, and the horse was really good.”

The final three rounds in the bareback riding will be a shootout, as world standings leader Steven Dent is only $32,097 ahead of Mote, who is fifth in the world. Mote is tied for second in the Wrangler NFR average, while Dent is tied for sixth.

Team roping was a tight battle in Round 7, with seven-tenths of a second separating first from sixth place. The team of Brady Tryan and Jake Long won their second round of the 10-day event with a 3.9-second run, one-tenth of a second ahead of three teams: Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, Keven Daniel/Caleb Twisselman and Ty Blasingame/Cody Hintz.

“It’s a blast,” Tryan said of roping at his first Wrangler NFR. “Our goal was to come here and win as much as we could. We’ve already done better than we could have counted on, being two first-timers here. We’re just going to stick with the plan to win as much as we can every night, and see where it takes us.”

Tryan and Long may be Wrangler NFR rookies, but they are in the world-title hunt, standing fifth in the world and third in the Wrangler NFR average.

“We’re just having a great time out here,” Long said. “It’s been better than we could have expected. It’s been like a dream. We didn’t think we liked the steer we had tonight. They were no-time on him the first two times he went. He tries to run to the right out of the chute. We talked about it before the rodeo and decided I would be really aggressive about hazing him to try to keep him running straight.”

The barrel racing went to two-time World Champion Sherry Cervi, who stopped the clock in 13.70 seconds to finish three-tenths of a second quicker than 2008 World Champion Lindsay Sears. Lisa Lockhart – who has earned an event-best $68,165 after placing in six of the first seven rounds – finished third in the round in 13.93 seconds.

Cervi, who also won Round 3, has placed in five rounds and earned $58,750 in Las Vegas thus far.

“It’s been a really great barrel racing this week,” said Cervi, who is riding her 8-year-old Palomino mare Stingray. “In barrel racing, it’s all about your horse, and I’m grateful to be able to ride her. At any time, anybody can win a round here. There’s pressure because I want to win $17,000 ($17,512) every night. I want to win as much money as I can.”

Cervi’s $238,602 in earnings this season is $84,968 shy of Sears’ single-season earnings record from 2008 with three rounds and the average payout remaining.

LAS VEGAS – Fellow bull riders and steer wrestlers beware: two-time World Champions J.W. Harris and Luke Branquinho are red hot.

Harris, of Mullin, TX, won the bull riding for the third straight night at the 2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo and for the fourth time in seven rounds, and Branquinho won for the third time – and second in a row – in front of 17,132 at the Thomas & Mack Center. Both cowboys took over the top spots in their respective events thanks to their Round 7 victories at the $5.875 million rodeo.

Harris’ win came thanks to a rodeo-best 94.5-point ride aboard Frontier Rodeo’s Smoke Screen, and he is the only bull rider to have covered six bulls at this year’s Finals. Wrangler NFR rookie Tyler Smith was second in Round 7 with a score of 89 points.

He has now earned $92,644 – the second most of any of the 119 contestants – in Las Vegas this year and is riding high.

“It’s the highest score I’ve had at the Finals and third-highest I’ve ever been,” said Harris, who leads the Wrangler NFR average by 117.5 points over Cody Whitney. “I’ve had a good Finals, but I just have to keep moving forward. I’ve come here to win the gold buckle. That’s what I’m after.”

Harris has $180,447 in total season earnings, $15,939 ahead of 2007 World Champion Wesley Silcox, who led the world standings through Round 6.

Branquinho, of Los Alamos, CA, took over the No. 1 spot in the PRCA World Standings in the process. Branquinho, who won world titles in 2004 and 2008, won Round 7 with a rodeo-best 3.3-second run, one-tenth of a second faster than Trevor Knowles and two-tenths of a second faster than Cody Cassidy.

He also won a share of first place in Round 2 and took Round 6. Branquinho now leads the PRCA World Standings with $143,667 after earning an event-best $53,525, while Knowles moved from fifth to second with $130,035 thanks to his runner-up finish.

Round 7 was an exciting one in the steer wrestling, with the lead changing three times in the last four runs. Branquinho was last to nod his head, and he made the most of it.

“It was really exciting, especially when you’re last out and 3.4 is winning the round,” Branquinho said. “I wasn’t trying to beat 3.4; I was just trying to back in there and make a good run. Luckily for me, I had the steer they won the first and fourth rounds on, so I knew I had a chance. But, at this stage, I was just trying to get a good start and make a good run.”

Wednesday night was a good time to be from Louisiana, as Heflin, LA, brothers Cody and Heith DeMoss shared the saddle bronc riding win and Sulphur, LA, tie-down roper Shane Hanchey won the tie-down roping.

Cody and Heith DeMoss had matching 87.5-point rides en route to the first-place tie. Cody DeMoss, the elder of the two, rode Burch Rodeo’s Friendly Fire to his $15,676 check, while Heith DeMoss earned the same check for his mark on Diamond G Rodeo’s Marla’s Rose.

“Shoot, battling with this son-of-a-gun day in and day out, it’s good to finally to tie him,” said Heith DeMoss, who crossed the $100,000 mark in season earnings ($112,817) thanks to the tie for the win. “And to do it at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo is heck of a feat. I’m glad to be here with him. It’s an awesome deal.”

It was Heith DeMoss’ third check of the 2010 Wrangler NFR, while his older brother has now cashed in four rounds.

“Winning the round here is amazing anyway, because you beat the Top 15 in the world, but to tie your brother for the round is so cool,” said Cody DeMoss, who is third in the Wrangler NFR average standings. “We have dreamed about something like this growing up and in our whole careers. We always both want to win it, but to split it with my brother is beyond my wildest dreams.”

The saddle bronc riding has developed into a two-man race between Wade Sundell and 2008 World Champion Cody Wright. Wright leads the world with $174,989 and leads the Wrangler NFR average with 597 points on seven head, and Sundell is right on his heels with $171,854 and a second-place ranking in the average with 594.

Wrangler NFR rookie Hanchey won the tie-down roping with a 7.6-second run, five-tenths of a second ahead of two-time World Champion Tie-Down Roper Trevor Brazile. It was Hanchey’s first round win and fourth check of the rodeo thus far, and he stands sixth in the world and fourth in the Wrangler NFR average standings.

Hanchey said he had a good feeling about his run, especially after seeing the DeMoss brothers take their victory lap.

“When they said 8.1, I said, ‘This is my round,'” said Hanchey, of Sulphur, LA. “I had the calf to do it – Trevor had won the round on that calf before – so I knew it was mine for the taking. When the DeMoss brothers split the bronc riding, that was God telling me, ‘This is your night.'”

Brazile’s runner-up finish pushed his lead in the tie-down roping world standings over his brother-in-law Tuf Cooper to more than $25,000, and he stands third in the Wrangler NFR average. Cooper is second in the average, which is led by seven-time World Champion Tie-Down Roper Fred Whitfield, who is fifth in the world standings.

In the bareback riding, three-time and reigning World Champion Bobby Mote broke through for a round victory after spurring Classic Pro Rodeo’s Cimmaron for 85.5 points. That score left the Culver, OR, cowboy a half-point ahead of Clint Cannon and added another $17,512 to his bottom line.

Mote, who finished second in the first two rounds, was happy to get along so well with a horse that was new to him.

“I had a horse I’d never seen or heard of before, and I was kind of glad because a lot of the ones I’ve had this week that haven’t been as good were ones I’d both seen and heard of. So, having one I didn’t know, I really didn’t have much of a game plan. I just wanted to go make a good ride, and the horse was really good.”

The final three rounds in the bareback riding will be a shootout, as world standings leader Steven Dent is only $32,097 ahead of Mote, who is fifth in the world. Mote is tied for second in the Wrangler NFR average, while Dent is tied for sixth.

Team roping was a tight battle in Round 7, with seven-tenths of a second separating first from sixth place. The team of Brady Tryan and Jake Long won their second round of the 10-day event with a 3.9-second run, one-tenth of a second ahead of three teams: Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, Keven Daniel/Caleb Twisselman and Ty Blasingame/Cody Hintz.

“It’s a blast,” Tryan said of roping at his first Wrangler NFR. “Our goal was to come here and win as much as we could. We’ve already done better than we could have counted on, being two first-timers here. We’re just going to stick with the plan to win as much as we can every night, and see where it takes us.”

Tryan and Long may be Wrangler NFR rookies, but they are in the world-title hunt, standing fifth in the world and third in the Wrangler NFR average.

“We’re just having a great time out here,” Long said. “It’s been better than we could have expected. It’s been like a dream. We didn’t think we liked the steer we had tonight. They were no-time on him the first two times he went. He tries to run to the right out of the chute. We talked about it before the rodeo and decided I would be really aggressive about hazing him to try to keep him running straight.”

The barrel racing went to two-time World Champion Sherry Cervi, who stopped the clock in 13.70 seconds to finish three-tenths of a second quicker than 2008 World Champion Lindsay Sears. Lisa Lockhart – who has earned an event-best $68,165 after placing in six of the first seven rounds – finished third in the round in 13.93 seconds.

Cervi, who also won Round 3, has placed in five rounds and earned $58,750 in Las Vegas thus far.

“It’s been a really great barrel racing this week,” said Cervi, who is riding her 8-year-old Palomino mare Stingray. “In barrel racing, it’s all about your horse, and I’m grateful to be able to ride her. At any time, anybody can win a round here. There’s pressure because I want to win $17,000 ($17,512) every night. I want to win as much money as I can.”

Cervi’s $238,602 in earnings this season is $84,968 shy of Sears’ single-season earnings record from 2008 with three rounds and the average payout remaining.

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