Yellow-flowered alfalfa improving semiarid grasslands | TSLN.com

Yellow-flowered alfalfa improving semiarid grasslands

SDSU Ag Communications

Courtesy photoSouth Dakota State University graduate student Christopher Misar's research evaluates yellow-flowered alfalfa as a tool to boost the nutrition in semiarid grasslands such as this crested wheatgrass pasture in eastern Wyoming.

More than 100 years after an explorer first brought yellow-flowered alfalfa from Siberia to North America, South Dakota State University (SDSU) scientists are exploring one of his century-old ideas: Use it to boost the nutrition in semiarid grasslands.

Specifically, SDSU scientists are exploring whether yellow-flowered alfalfa can improve the quality of grazing in pastures of crested wheatgrass. Crested wheatgrass is a non-native, cool season grass that offers livestock good nutrition early in the year but isn’t as nutritious or palatable as temperatures warm during the summer.

More than 100 years after an explorer first brought yellow-flowered alfalfa from Siberia to North America, South Dakota State University (SDSU) scientists are exploring one of his century-old ideas: Use it to boost the nutrition in semiarid grasslands.

Specifically, SDSU scientists are exploring whether yellow-flowered alfalfa can improve the quality of grazing in pastures of crested wheatgrass. Crested wheatgrass is a non-native, cool season grass that offers livestock good nutrition early in the year but isn’t as nutritious or palatable as temperatures warm during the summer.

More than 100 years after an explorer first brought yellow-flowered alfalfa from Siberia to North America, South Dakota State University (SDSU) scientists are exploring one of his century-old ideas: Use it to boost the nutrition in semiarid grasslands.

Specifically, SDSU scientists are exploring whether yellow-flowered alfalfa can improve the quality of grazing in pastures of crested wheatgrass. Crested wheatgrass is a non-native, cool season grass that offers livestock good nutrition early in the year but isn’t as nutritious or palatable as temperatures warm during the summer.

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More than 100 years after an explorer first brought yellow-flowered alfalfa from Siberia to North America, South Dakota State University (SDSU) scientists are exploring one of his century-old ideas: Use it to boost the nutrition in semiarid grasslands.

Specifically, SDSU scientists are exploring whether yellow-flowered alfalfa can improve the quality of grazing in pastures of crested wheatgrass. Crested wheatgrass is a non-native, cool season grass that offers livestock good nutrition early in the year but isn’t as nutritious or palatable as temperatures warm during the summer.

More than 100 years after an explorer first brought yellow-flowered alfalfa from Siberia to North America, South Dakota State University (SDSU) scientists are exploring one of his century-old ideas: Use it to boost the nutrition in semiarid grasslands.

Specifically, SDSU scientists are exploring whether yellow-flowered alfalfa can improve the quality of grazing in pastures of crested wheatgrass. Crested wheatgrass is a non-native, cool season grass that offers livestock good nutrition early in the year but isn’t as nutritious or palatable as temperatures warm during the summer.

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