Youth take advantage of summer internships | TSLN.com

Youth take advantage of summer internships

Amanda Nolz

Photo by Amanda NolzWith a strong passion for the meat industry, Matt Altman will serve as a summer intern for John Morrell & Co. in Sioux Falls, SD.

A vet student examines a dead piglet, an ag journalism student writes for a breed publication, an animal science student tries out work in a packing plant, an agronomy student works to sell seed. For students in the college of agricultural and biological sciences at South Dakota State University, career possibilities are endless in the agriculture industry.

A college experience is more than class work and part-time jobs. While grades and classroom experience are vital to earning a four-year degree, many employers are taking a closer look at students’ summer internship experiences. With an increasing emphasis on work experience, students taking advantage of summer internships gain valuable experience in areas of interest. Career exploration and a further commitment to their respected industry are additional benefits of a summer internship.

At college, internships have many objectives for participating students including: to give students the opportunity to participate in meaningful educational experiences consistent with their education; to permit a student to obtain the best combination of on-campus and off-campus educational experiences; to help the student make more realistic choices in their course work; to allow employers to evaluate the skills of the student for potential employment; and to allow a student to experience real-life work situations.

Joe Duprel of Sturgis, SD is a senior animal science student at SDSU. Duprel grew up on a 7,000 acre ranch where his family owns a 350 head cattle operation. With his work on the ranch and a local construction company, Duprel thought his last summer in college would be well spent in a summer internship. Duprel secured an internship with Stans Incorporated and Heartland Pork, a trucking company and hog operation out of Alpena, SD. He works extensively in the feed mill, with feed sales, conducting office duties and working in hog production.

“I thought it was important to get my feet wet in the animal science field,” said Duprel, who hopes to find employment in South Dakota and continue working within the agricultural field. “I get to try a lot of different things within this one summer internship. As a result, I can explore a lot of career opportunities.”

For Jace Hollenbeck, a member of the 2008 SDSU Meats Judging Team, finding an internship in the meat industry was extremely important. After a successful season of meats judging, Hollenbeck earned a position with USDA Food Safety Inspection Service as a student trainee and food inspector for harvest.

Recommended Stories For You

A vet student examines a dead piglet, an ag journalism student writes for a breed publication, an animal science student tries out work in a packing plant, an agronomy student works to sell seed. For students in the college of agricultural and biological sciences at South Dakota State University, career possibilities are endless in the agriculture industry.

A college experience is more than class work and part-time jobs. While grades and classroom experience are vital to earning a four-year degree, many employers are taking a closer look at students’ summer internship experiences. With an increasing emphasis on work experience, students taking advantage of summer internships gain valuable experience in areas of interest. Career exploration and a further commitment to their respected industry are additional benefits of a summer internship.

At college, internships have many objectives for participating students including: to give students the opportunity to participate in meaningful educational experiences consistent with their education; to permit a student to obtain the best combination of on-campus and off-campus educational experiences; to help the student make more realistic choices in their course work; to allow employers to evaluate the skills of the student for potential employment; and to allow a student to experience real-life work situations.

Joe Duprel of Sturgis, SD is a senior animal science student at SDSU. Duprel grew up on a 7,000 acre ranch where his family owns a 350 head cattle operation. With his work on the ranch and a local construction company, Duprel thought his last summer in college would be well spent in a summer internship. Duprel secured an internship with Stans Incorporated and Heartland Pork, a trucking company and hog operation out of Alpena, SD. He works extensively in the feed mill, with feed sales, conducting office duties and working in hog production.

“I thought it was important to get my feet wet in the animal science field,” said Duprel, who hopes to find employment in South Dakota and continue working within the agricultural field. “I get to try a lot of different things within this one summer internship. As a result, I can explore a lot of career opportunities.”

For Jace Hollenbeck, a member of the 2008 SDSU Meats Judging Team, finding an internship in the meat industry was extremely important. After a successful season of meats judging, Hollenbeck earned a position with USDA Food Safety Inspection Service as a student trainee and food inspector for harvest.

Go back to article