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Successful wild horse gather sets positive tone for the future

The dust in Modoc County, California has settled and the frenzy regarding the wild horse gather on the Devil's Garden Plateau has all but died down. However, the wild horse issue is still at the forefront of Laura Snell's mind. The Modoc County Farm Advisor was often the scapegoat for negative media coverage regarding the wild horses in Modoc County, but her hard work appears to be paying off.

"Things went great in terms of the gather," said Snell. Of the 4,000 head of feral horses calling the Devil's Garden home, 932 were successfully gathered and processed by the Forest Service. With those 932 head off The Garden, Snell happily reports that plans for another gather in the fall of 2019 are in the works.

Of the 932 horses gathered, 261 of those horses stayed behind at the Double Devil Corrals in Modoc. The 261 horses that remained in Modoc were older horses, roughly half being pregnant mares. Despite their age, Snell and her colleagues saw a huge response from the public about rehoming these particular horses.

Initially, Snell faced extreme pushback regarding the proposed Sale With Limitations program which allowed horses to be sold to private parties rather than adopted. The program would make the Devil's Garden horses available for purchase for as low as one dollar per head with the stipulation that horses would not be purchased with the intent of slaughter or consumption. Despite all the backlash Snell received, including death threats and lawsuits, the Sale With Limitations program has successfully placed all but 58 head of horses from the Double Devil Corrals. "A vast majority of those horses were sold for $1 to wild horse sanctuaries," said Snell, noting she was happy to see activists stepping up to the plate.

While the Double Devil Corrals have seen huge success with horses finding permanent homes, the remaining 653 horses that were sent to the Litchfield Wild Horse Corrals have yet to be processed for adoption or purchase. With the Northern California region being hammered by winter storms, the BLM has been set back tremendously. "We haven't had a break in the weather for two solid months," said Snell.

Horses sent to Litchfield represented the much younger and viable stock from the gather, and Snell believes this is a huge opportunity for people wanting to get solid horses for such a low cost. The horses at the Litchfield corrals, once processed, will be offered for adoption three times and if not adopted they will be available for the purchase program. Snell hopes that many of these horses will be ready for the public by the end of March and substantial progress must be made by the end of June. "This (the number of horses adopted/sold from Litchfield) will have an impact on how many we can be gathered next year," she said.

Despite the setback being faced at the Litchfield corrals, the "climate" in Modoc County is improving. "Things are much better than they were a year ago," said Snell. With two permits being deemed complete non-use for cattle grazing in the Modoc National Forest due to wild horse populations, ranchers in the area have been hit hard by the lack of initiative in previous years. However, Snell was happy to report that conversations are being had between the Forest Service and local permit holders to allow cattle back onto those permits this year. With just over 900 head of horses being removed from the permits, the opportunity for cattle to once again utilize the range is becoming the light at the end of tunnel for many in Modoc County, California.

SDQHA Convention: Cowans, Papendicks, Baltezores, more honored

PIERRE, SD –Through its unwavering dedication to the promotion of the American Quarter Horse, the South Dakota Quarter Horse Association has now entered into its 70th year! A national leader, the state boasts approximately 3,600 members with a state population of approximately 80,000 registered Quarter Horses.

The 2018 SDQHA Annual Convention was once again presented at the Ramkota Hotel and Convention Center on the east bank of the Missouri River in Pierre, SD on Saturday, Jan. 12. An Executive Committee meeting in the morning was followed by their annual general membership meeting in the afternoon. Special guest, incoming AQHA President Stan Weaver from Big Sandy, Montana, spoke at the conclusion of the meeting offering a question and answer session. The evening was capped off with a social, SDQHA and SDQHYA Year-End Awards and a banquet. Following dinner, special award presentations were made honoring the 2018 SDQHA Producer Of The Year, 2018 PRCA Hall Of Fame Inductee, AQHA 50-Year Cumulative Award Winner and 7 new SDQHA Legacy Honorees. The evening events were dedicated to the memory of long time SDQHA member and supporter Kathryn Hootman from Harrisburg who passed away in September.

Now into its second year, the 'SDQHA Legacy Celebration' started off with a social Friday evening across the river in Fort Pierre at the Casey Tibbs Rodeo Center for the honorees, their families and friends and dignitaries. Capping off the weekend, a Cowboy Church Fellowship was held on Sunday morning at the Ramkota. Tracy Buer, Bison, SD, sang the National Anthem and provided vocal entertainment for the SDQHA Convention at both the dinner and church service.

Lieutenant Governor Larry Rhoden led the prayer and read an Executive Proclamation from the office of newly sworn in SD Governor Kristi Noem. Saturday, January 12, 2019 was officially proclaimed 'South Dakota Quarter Horse Association Legacy Honorees Day'.

Elected to lead the SDQHA again in 2019 is President Kristen Gonsoir from Groton. She will be assisted by Vice-President Jodie Svennes, Brandt, along with the re-appointments of Victoria Cuka from Vale as the 2019 Secretary/Treasurer and Janet Hansen, Fort Pierre, as the association point secretary. Board of Directors from the East are Amy Krueger, Ferney; Dede Cuka, Wagner; and Jodie Svennes from Brandt. Representing the Central Region are Penny Petersen, Mitchell; Kristen Gonsoir, Groton; and Sheila Prins from Sisseton. SDQHA Directors from the West are Shirley Wetz, Vale; Hope Hall, Box Elder and Bob Quickstad from Sturgis. Joellen Miller, Groton; Joni Hunt, Faith; and Heather Sutton from Gettysburg will represent the At-Large Directorships. Becky Johnson, Mud Butte, remains on the board for 2019 as the SDQHYA Youth Advisor.

AQHA Directors representing SDQHA on the National level are Janet Hansen, Fort Pierre; Debbi Holmes Stockstill, Virgil; Jim Hunt, Faith; and Dean Johnson from Mud Butte. AQHA Directors-At-Large are Larry Larson, Rapid City; Dr. R.M. Christensen, Harrisburg; and James Sutton from Onida along with Directors Emeritus Jim Hootman, Harrisburg, and Mike Clites from Brookings.

2018 SDQHA Year-End All-Arounds were recognized during the Awards Presentation on Saturday Evening. Wanda Carr and One Powerful Krymsun captured both the Amateur and Level 1 Amateur All-Arounds; Jodie Svennes and Zipped With Pleasure were the Amateur Select All-Around and Reserve Amateur All-Around in the Level 1 Division; and Andrea Butler and My Details Are Blazing were the Amateur Select Reserve All-Around for 2018.

The South Dakota Quarter Horse Youth Association (SDQHYA) was represented at the convention by their President Shelby Holmes, Sioux Falls, and Kim Johnson from Mud Butte. Their annual meeting and election of 2019 officers will be held later this spring when more of their members can attend. Their 2018 Award Winners announced on Saturday evening include Emily Johnson and RPM Machine – 14-18 All-Around Youth, Overall High-Point Youth and High-Point Senior Girl; Rachel Retterrath and Butterscotch Blend – Reserve Level 1 All-Around Youth; Jazmine Hart-Crissman and One Hot Molly – 13 & Under All-Around Youth and High-Point Junior Girl; and Colin Sprinkel with This Tigers Hot – Reserve 14-18 All-Around Youth, Level 1 All-Around and High-Point Senior Boy.

Thank you for your support and generous donations to the SDQHA at our silent and live Auctions on Saturday evening. The monetary support is much needed and greatly appreciated so we can continue to celebrate the American Quarter Horse and the South Dakota families that have dedicated their lives to the promotion of the world's number one breed!

Special awards announced during the evening include the 2018 SDQHA Sportsmanship Award being presented to Phil Svennes from Brandt. Most Valuable Professional Horseman was awarded to Kristen Gonsoir from Groton. For the first time in many years, SDQHA presented Life Memberships to Jim Hootman, Harrisburg, and Mike and Vicky Clites from Brookings for their unending dedication to the association.

2018 SDQHA PRODUCER OF THE YEAR – Bob and Karen Meyer, Glad Valley, SD. Both growing up with horses in their lives, they started in the production end of the Quarter Horse business by first pasturing a band of mares and a stallion for close friend, Lee Lopez. Partnering on those first foals, they gradually started putting their own band of broodmares mares together and eventually joined with Lopez and Geno and Effie Hunt to produce an annual Quarter Horse Production sale. Liking the performance, 'cow bred' bloodlines, the Meyers sold out their 2018 foals, band of broodmares and several stallions in September 2018 after offering an annual sale for the past 43 years.

AQHA 50-YEAR CUMULATIVE BREEDER – Jim Taylor, Huron, SD. Founding his American Quarter Horse breeding operation in 1965, he purchased Vanzi Joe, a 1965 stallion sired by Vanzi Bar out of Rosa Jo by Chihuahua Joe. He currently runs a band of 20 broodmares and 2 stallions and to date, has produce 97 foals with several horses competing successfully in roping events and ranch rodeos.

2018 PRCA HALL OF FAME INDUCTEE – French Flash Hawk 'Bozo'. Bred by John and Lis Hollmann from Hot Springs, SD, Bozo touched off a revolution in the barrel racing industry. Chuck and Kristie Peterson from Elbert, Colorado, purchased him as a two-year-old and the rest is history. He won his first of 4 WPRA Barrel Racing World Championship titles in 1994. They went on to win 3 more World Titles (1996-1998), 3 reserve World titles, 5 consecutive NFR Average titles and 4 DNCFR titles. He was also voted as the AQHA/PRCA Horse of the Year 5 times.

2018 SDQHA LEGACY HONOREES include: TRAINER – Darrel & Marlene Griffith; RODEO – John & Cindy Baltezore; SHOW – Lew & Kerry Papendick; RACE – Bob & Shilo Johnson; PROMOTION – Lynn & Connie Weishaar; RANCH – Art & Mary Cowan; INFLUENTIAL HORSE – As Good As It Gets, Neil Sebring Family.

The 2019 SDQHA Convention will again be at the Ramkota Hotel in Pierre, South Dakota on January 3-5, 2020. Mark your calendars now to help us celebrate the next round of SDQHA honorees. Find full coverage of SDQHA/SDQHYA Year-End award winners and the Legacy Honorees at http://www.SDQHA.com

2018 SDQHA LEGACY CELEBRATION

New in 2018, SDQHA Legacy Honorees include families and horses that have be influential in South Dakota's history in the promotion of the American Quarter Horse.

SDQHA LEGACY TRAINER – Darrel and Marlene Griffith, Spearfish, SD. Starting with a handful of broodmares and the AQHA stallion Major Mike, their business eventually evolved into a performance horse training operation on their ranch near Faith, SD. Concentrating on cutting, their accomplishments in the arena brought national acclaim to not only their own horses, but also those they had in training for the public. Success in the arena was shared with their children as well. Griffith Training Stables at one time was booked a year in advance with clients from Texas to Canada. It took all of their family to make things work.

SDQHA LEGACY RODEO – John and Cindy Baltezore, Beresford, SD. With beginnings in the 1960s in the show ring, to John being named the National Intercollegiate Rodeo President and Cindy serving as a girl's team coach in the 1970s, they have remained a vital part of the horse industry at many levels. Starting a family and launching Lincoln Stables in the 1980s plus standing several accomplished stallions kept them busy over the years. They campaigned horses to many SDQHA wins and AQHA World Show qualifications and they are still deeply involved in the Quarter Horse industry.

SDQHA LEGACY SHOW – Lew and Kerry Papendick, Rapid City, SD. Along with their daughters Kristina and Ali, they have won a combined 20 AQHA World Championships in Open, Amateur, Youth and Select Amateur. They began showing at the national level in 1999 and have shown at every major event including the AQHA World Show, Quarter Horse Congress, Sun Circuit, etc. Two of their past champions, Harley D Zip and Ima Triple Zip, are both 24 years old now and living the good life in the pastures at their home south of Rapid City.

SDQHA LEGACY RACE – Bob and Shilo Johnson, Lemmon, SD. Starting in the horse business at the early age of 9 years old, Bob won his first race in Lemmon, SD. Major awards have rolled in over the years including SDQHRA Leading Quarter Horse Trainer for 30 years; AQHA Challenge Champion Trainer 2017-2018; won his 1,000th race in 2007 and his 1,300th race in October of 2018. His wife, Shilo, has been an active member of their team and comes from a Thoroughbred racing family – her late father Bill Parker and mother Linda have won over 800 races and were leading trainers in New Mexico and Arizona.

SDQHA LEGACY PROMOTION – Lynn and Connie Weishaar, Reva, SD. Always knowing that his true passion was being an auctioneer, Lynn grew up near Lemmon, SD and while in college at NDSU, he attended auctioneer school in Billings, MT. While still at NDSU, he met his future wife, Connie, and they have been married 50 years. His career as a horse auctioneer started with a new sale being offered by Dr. Ron Ford. His year is scheduled tight with horse and cattle sales and Connie has kept the ranch running as well as continuing her community and regional involvement.

SDQHA LEGACY RANCH – Art and Mary Cowan, Pierre, SD. Married in 1935, they moved to the Highmore, SD area where they raised 6 children – Pat, Willie, Annie (Fulton), Lex (Werdel), Mike and Tim. Making their living buying and selling horses, Art contracted with the US government in the 1940s to furnish work horses with horses being shipped overseas. They went on to producing rodeos with saddle bronc and bareback taking front stage as there were few timed events at that time. In 1946 he was instrumental in bringing a band of broodmares and a stallion from Texas and it was the foundation of their registered Quarter Horse herd.

SDQHA INFLUENTIAL HORSE – As Good As It Gets, Neil Sebring Family, Brookings, SD. This 1993 stallion was sired by Zippos Mr Good Bar and out of the mare Invest A Lynx by the The Invester. His own impressive show record included 52.5 Open Western Pleasure points and 236.5 in the Amateur Western Pleasure (Superior Western Pleasure in both divisions) and he was a Finalist at the 1998 AQHA World Show. He sired 70 foals with 1,342 Open Performance Points, 1,818.5 Amateur Points and 1,302.5 Youth Points. The total of 5,168.5 points included AQHA Incentive Fund earnings of $66,931, World Show earnings $13,084 and NSBA earnings of $15,766.

Each of the 2018 SDQHA Honorees was presented with Star Quilts donated by the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Nominations are now being taken for 2019 recipients of these awards.

SDQHA honoree: Weishaar family raises, rides, promotes and auctions horses

When he was five years old, the barn on the home place for Lynn Weishaar was the sale barn. He tied up his favorite dog and got up in the hay mow, pretending it was the auction block, as he sold bucket calves to the pup.

Sixty-five years later, Lynn and his wife Connie have been recognized by the South Dakota Quarter Horse Association for their contributions as promoter of the industry.

Lynn was born in 1947 to Art and Bernice Weishaar on a ranch near Lemmon, S.D., and Connie was born to Les and Ollie Fritz near Belfield.

Lynn grew up participating in 4-H and FFA. During his high school days, he worked in the back pens in the auction barn in Lemmon. As he worked, he sang out his auctioneer chant. One day the boss, Robert Schnell, stepped outside and heard it. He told Lynn, "you'd better do something with that." And he did.

In college at North Dakota State University, Lynn competed on the horse judging team, winning the quarter horse judging class at the American Royal. He gave the highest oral reasons score, holding the record for nearly forty years.

Then he attended auctioneering school in Billings. He and Connie, who married in 1968, started ranching, and Lynn sold everything: farm sales, cattle and hogs, and then horses. As time went on, his reputation for being a good auctioneer grew and his calendar was full. At one time, he sold more than three hundred sales a year, spending days at a time away from home and selling in every state west of the Missouri except for New Mexico and Washington.

He's sold everything from the little to the big, some of the highest selling Angus, Charolais and Hereford cattle in the nation. During last year's Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, he estimated that of the fifteen barrel racers, he had sold either the barrel horse or the sire of eight of the barrel horses.

But it's not always the money. "I've sold them in the hundreds of thousands of dollars and I've sold them for little to nothing," Lynn said. "We all like to talk about the high dollar horse but I've sold some for not much money."

And the job of an auctioneer goes far beyond the chant. He does his homework before a sale, knowing what the genetics and statistics are for the animals that will be in the ring. "There are always genetics more popular at times," he said. "It's pretty important to know what bloodlines are popular, who owns them, their numbers, their EPDs and performance records."

It all boils down to the people, and Lynn's auctioneering schedule has stayed full because people trust him. "The people who have faith in you trust you. They hired you because they thought you could do the best job you could. That made me feel good." For years, he had trouble finding open dates to work sales, because he was in demand. "People having trust and faith in you means a lot." And it didn't matter if the sale was for hundreds of thousands of dollars, or hundreds of dollars. "Whether they're high dollar or not, every sale is important to the seller. Whether it averages a lot or not, it's important for the people you're working for."

Working alongside Lynn is John Johnson, a "pedigree man" who travels with Lynn frequently. John, who lives in Piedmont, S.D., is there to elaborate on the pedigrees of the horses or cattle that Lynn is selling. During the sale, if there needs to be a break to give potential buyers time to think about bidding, Lynn will "poke" John and John discusses genetics. Johnson is "very astute in the horse genetics," Lynn said, and Connie attributes her husband and John with making sales more professional with their partnership.

Lynn met Connie at NDSU. She had been in a horse wreck and was hobbling across campus. She caught his eye, and as Lynn said, "she had a broken leg and couldn't get away from me." The two celebrated fifty years of marriage in the fall of 2018.

When they first married, they leased a ranch. As time went on, they had enough money to buy a place. As Lynn sold, Connie stayed home, ran the ranch, sewed the family's clothes, raised two kids, and "was very capable of doing it," Lynn said. "She's been the mainstay," he said. "I'm serious when I said she ran the ranch by herself. We lived in a remote place, and there were days I'd come home and she'd have everything done. She's been the backbone of this outfit."

But Lynn's sense of humor shows itself. "She's a lucky woman," he chuckles. And Connie has her own retort: "he's been telling me that for fifty years." The pair have raised quarter horses, ranch horses, and commercial cattle for years.

Lynn doesn't list the production sales he's worked, for fear of leaving someone out. Although he doesn't put on the 120,000 miles a year that he used to, he still sells production horse and cattle sales across the nation as well as the weekly sales at Philip and Belle Fourche.

He's seen a lot of changes in the quarter horse world since he began. Years ago, most horses sold as ranch horses. Now, it's getting more specialized, with the demand for team roping or barrel horses, for example, or even for those who choose to trail ride, "and are at retirement age, and want to spend a lot of money on a nice, gentle horse," he said. "You can't take them lightly."

But some things never change. There's still a high demand for ranch horses, and soundness and temperament are always needed. "Soundness is a big issue, something that will last and be with you quite a while," he said. "And disposition is a big factor. It's a big factor in any part of the business."

He's cut down on his schedule, and Connie is able to go with him more often, since the kids are grown. But he still savors the best part: the people and the livestock. "I've had the privilege of selling the best horses and cattle that walk the face of the earth. I enjoy the people and the livestock."

Lynn has been honored with several awards. He is an inductee into the National Livestock Marketeers Hall of Fame, was Ag Businessman of the Year at the Black Hills Stock Show, and is a Hero-Legend honoree at the Black Hills Stock Show and Central States Fair, among others.

Lynn and Connie have two children: Seth, who is married to Nicole and who also an auctioneer, and their children Shaine, Sern and Slone, and Jodi, who is married to Rob Hendrickson, and their children Ollie and Scout.

Jess Lockwood selected to Team USA-Eagles

Matt Triplett also joins Eagles, while Cannon Cravens and Justin Granger are the latest additions to the historic all-Native American Team USA-Wolves

NEW YORK CITY – With the first-ever PBR (Professional Bull Riders) Global Cup on U.S. soil less than a month away, four new riders set to compete for host nation's two contingents have been announced. 2017 PBR World Champion Jess Lockwood's (Volborg, Montana) selection to Team USA-Eagles headlines the additions.

The PBR Global Cup, the only nation vs. nation bull riding competition, will make its U.S. debut, and third stop, at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas on February 9-10, 2019 with the 2019 WinStar World Casino and Resort Global Cup USA. The new team tournament debuted in Edmonton, Alberta in November 2017 and then visited Sydney, Australia in June 2018.

Selected by two-time PBR World Champion and Coach Justin McBride (Elk City, Oklahoma), Lockwood was added to the seven-man Eagles team alongside fellow Montana-born rider Matt Triplett (Columbia Falls, Montana).

The duo joins already announced teammates 2016 PBR World Champion Cooper Davis (Buna, Texas), Cody Nance (Paris, Tennessee), Chase Outlaw (Hamburg, Arkansas) and Cody Teel (Kountze, Texas).

Team USA-Wolves' coach Wiley Petersen (Fort Hall, Idaho; Shoshone Bannock) also selected two new competitors for his squad: Cannon Cravens (Porum Oklahoma; Cherokee) and Justin Granger (Tuba City, Arizona; Navajo).

Cravens and Granger join Ryan Dirteater (Hulbert, Oklahoma; Cherokee), Stetson Lawrence (Williston, North Dakota; Chippewa and Sioux), Keyshawn Whitehorse (McCracken Springs, Utah; Navajo) and Cody Jesus (Window Rock, Arizona; Navajo). These athletes are set to ride on a team poised to make modern sports history as the first all-Native American team competing at a major league sporting event.

The 2019 Global Cup USA will mark Lockwood's second appearance at the five-nation bull riding spectacle.

Sidelined from the inaugural stop in Edmonton due to injury, Lockwood proudly donned the USA jersey in Sydney. He contributed one score to the nation's total inside Qudos Bank Arena, 82.75 points on Red Man (Throsby & Russell Bucking Bulls), helping them to a fourth-place finish.

In 2017, Lockwood became the youngest PBR World Champion in history. After beginning the World Finals No. 4 in the rankings, 467.5 points behind then No. 1 Derek Kolbaba (Walla Walla, Washington), the 21-year-old historically won the World Finals' three opening rounds to propel him to the world title.

Battling numerous injuries in 2018, including a torn groin, Lockwood finished the most recent season No. 12 in the world rankings. On the elite PBR Unleash The Beast he won the tour stop in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and also earned eight Top-10 efforts. Lockwood also won the 15/15 Bucking Battle in Tulsa, Oklahoma after covering Canadian Mist (TNT Bucking Bulls / Hart Cattle Co.) for 91.5 points – a career-high score for Lockwood on the premier series.

After undergoing reconstructive shoulder surgery at the end of the 2017 season, Triplett did not make his PBR debut in 2018 until April at the Columbus, Ohio premier series stop. Riding at the final two Unleash The Beast events of the first half, finishing twelfth in Columbus and sixth at the third PBR Major of the Year, Last Cowboy Standing in Las Vegas, Triplett earned 340 world points competing throughout the summer to begin the second half No. 36 in the world.

During the final regular-season elite tour events of the 2018 season, Triplett's incredible climb continued. He earned five additional Top-10 efforts including the fourth Unleash The Beast event win of his career in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Going 4-for-6 at the 2018 PBR World Finals, including a win in Round 1 after riding Little Tucker (Patterson/Halpain) for 89.25 points, he finished the season No. 13 in the world standings, his best finish since 2015 when he ended the year No. 5.

Via his selection to Team USA-Wolves, 18-year-old Cravens is now the youngest rider set to compete at the PBR Global Cup.

Making his PBR debut in May on the Touring Pro Division (TPD), Cravens began to catch the eye of fans when he earned three runner-up finishes on the TPD during his summer campaign. Competing at his first Velocity Tour event in Salinas, California in August, Cravens quickly found his groove, finishing second in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania at his third event on the league's premier expansion series.

After winning the stop in Huntington, West Virginia, Cravens made his PBR Unleash The Beast debut in Greensboro, North Carolina, finishing second.

He qualified to the 2018 PBR World Finals as an alternate, making his debut at the most prestigious event in bull riding in Round 4.

Ten-plus year PBR veteran Granger's 2018 season was highlighted by a win on the Velocity Tour in March in Fresno, California. The 27-year-old also competed in five elite tour events, his first appearances on the Unleash The Beast since last reaching the premier series in 2014.

Tickets for the WinStar World Casino and Resort Global Cup USA are on sale now and start at just $10. They can be purchased at SeatGeek.com, PBR.com, or by calling PBRDirect at (800)732-1727.

–PBR

For the love of good horses

Although Art Cowan was born the same year that the first Model T was available for sale to the masses in the United States, he grew up using horses for everyday transportation, farm work, ranching. It was horses that helped pay for the ranch he and his wife, Mary, put together near Highmore, South Dakota, it was horses that their children grew up on and still today, their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren continue to work in the horse industry.

The couple's life-long love for good horse flesh is not unrecognized, and on Jan. 12 in Pierre, South Dakota Art and Mary will be honored posthumously for their contributions to the horse industry by the South Dakota Quarter Horse Association.

When Art, who came into the world in 1908, first began to make his living with horses in Grand Island, Nebraska. He worked for the Omaha Horse and Mule Co. under a foreman who was known for his meticulousness. It was there that his children imagine Art learned to pay close attention to details. Art's job was to show mules that were being purchased by the English government and sent to India and to care for the mules as they were being shipped overseas. Art was in charge of five to six men and 400 mules during the thirty-two-day ocean voyage.

"He had a chance to go to China with a boat load of mules, and I think mother, why she said if he went to China, she probably wouldn't be there when he got back," says Willie Cowan, their oldest surviving son. "Well he stayed and that was a smart man, wasn't he?"

Mary grew up a rancher's daughter and she knew horses and cattle well. In fact as a teenager she was the one who detected the outbreak of anthrax, an infectious disease, while she was riding through her family's herd.

Art and Mary wanted to run cattle and own horses of their own, so shortly after their marriage in 1935, the couple moved to Highmore and bought a ranch that they paid for by trading horses. It was there that they raised their six children while they bought horses from Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, North and South Dakota. They brought horses to the ranch to break them to drive or work on the ranch, then resold them. In the 1940s, Art had what he called the "Unruh" contract to furnish horses to the U.S. Government. The horses would be shipped overseas for the rehabilitation of Czechoslovakia and ewYugoslavia.

"We were little guys," Willie says of him and his older brother, Pat. The brothers were Art's main work force during that time because of the war. "I remember my mom saying, 'Art, they're too young,' and I remember him saying, 'I know that, but I've got to have them.'"

For three years, they trailed horses he bought or traded for to the ranch and from the ranch to the government inspection sites at Blunt, Faulkton and Miller. One particular time, they trailed a herd of 998 horses to the Miller inspection site and Art always said he wished they had turned some saddle horses loose with the herd, just to make it an even 1,000.

As could be expected, not all the horses Art bought and traded for were up to par, some were flat out bucking horses, so Art and Mary started putting on rodeos. When he heard of horses that had been bucking cowboys off, Art would buy them and bring them home for his own crew to try. If the horses kept bucking his cowboys off, the horses were put in the bucking horse string.

"He trailed them horses to all them rodeos, we never put them on a truck," Willie says. "We'd leave the ranch and trot into Miller and eat dinner in Miller. Twenty-four miles wasn't no deal, it was just a way to make a living."

Art and Mary eventually built a rodeo arena at the ranch. There, the rodeos were quite the family affair with Pat and Willie picking up, their sister, Annie, timing and Mary providing lunch. The family recalls Art saying that Mary would always make more money off the lunch stand than he did with the rodeo.

One of Art's horses they called the Old Gray Mare couldn't be halter broke, which was a requirement for being sold to the government, so he decided to buck her. In 1949, Art put the mare in a bucking horse sale in Fort Pierre and she was bought by Vern Elliot. Weeks later, Casey Tibbs won Cheyenne on her and today, a statue made by Tony Chytka commemorates that ride outside of the Casey Tibbs Rodeo Center. Another of Art's more well-known bucking horses is one he raised himself was named Weeping Willie. The stud horse was bought by Korkow-Sutton Rodeos and bucked in the 1966 National Finals Rodeo. Another horse, General Ike, bucked so hard that a lot of cowboys wouldn't get on him. Art priced General Ike to Joe Schomer for 500 dollars before he bucked in Fort Pierre once. Schomer started writing the check before the whistle blew because he thought Art might change his mind.

"I think before the Quarter Horse we had to ride quite a lot of them that weren't good horses," Willie says. "That's why we just love a good horse."

When Art and Mary started to breed their own horses, Art was particular about what he liked and didn't like. If he stood behind a horse and couldn't see it's withers, he didn't like it, he wanted a place to set his saddle. Horses were the Cowans' means of transportation, so they had to have good legs and when it came to his Quarter Horses, they had to have a sound mind.

Most of Art and Mary's foundation herd went back to a train load of horses that he and Cobbie Magness bought in 1946 from the Bivins brothers out of Texas. The Bivins mares, mostly out of the stud Blue Bivins, were the horses that brought the most success to the Cowan Ranch. Later, Pat and Tex Fulton, Art and Mary's son-in-law, bought a young stallion named Laughing Boy, who crossed well over the Bivins mares. James and Francis Louiseau brought many mares to Laughing Boy, and eventually, Laughing Boy became the grandsire to Frenchman's Guy and many other successful Quarter Horses. Art and Mary's niece, Lori Gregg Whiting won the circuit finals and qualified for the NFR on Marys Cute, a mare out of one of Art's mare's, Codys Cute Kid.

"The Quarter Horse has done our family a lot of good, but also just horses have done our family a lot of good as long as they're good at what they did," Willie says.

One winter in the early 1950s, Willie recalls Art coming to him and Pat one evening when Mary was very sick. It was already dark out and Mary needed to get to town. Art told his sons to harness two teams of work horses that they then hooked to the pickup, one team 15 feet ahead of the pickup, the other 30 feet ahead of the pickup.

"The roads were plugged with snow so we drug that pickup, Pat drove one team, I drove the other, and we got her to Highmore," Willie says. "Dad told us to go home because the rest of the kids were pretty little, so we just grabbed hold of the breeching and they were broke enough we stood on the double trees and rode them home."

It took four days for the children to hear if Mary made it through her pneumonia or not. She did, and went on to help grow the family up in many aspects of the horse business.

"That's why Art Cowan just loved a good horse, no matter what he was good at, whether it was a work horse, a bucking horse or one of his Quarter Horses," Willie says. "No question about it, all them horses they sent overseas, they bought our ranch. They had good cattle too, but if you cut Art Cowan's head apart, him and Mom both, I think horses would be above the cattle any day."

AQHA: Book Your Hotel for Convention

The American Quarter Horse Association is an organization that works for its members. Each spring, AQHA holds an annual convention to review member-submitted rule changes, appoint new AQHA directors, induct new members into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame and elect the AQHA Executive Committee. The 2019 AQHA Convention is March 8-11 at the Omni Fort Worth Hotel in Fort Worth, Texas.

Register for Convention

Register for convention by January 31 to avoid late fees. Attendees also have the option to purchase tickets for the much anticipated Hall of Fame Induction and the Boot Scootin' Foundation, featuring Asleep at the Wheel, hosted by the American Quarter Horse Foundation.

Sign-up for the guided Horse Farm Tour on Thursday, March 7, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. During the guided tour, you will enjoy beautiful vistas and relaxing backroads and will see miles of pipe-and-rail fencing, gorgeous countryside, impressive barns and lots of horses. The Horse Farm Tour is $45 per person and includes lunch. You can also relax, unwind and enjoy a selection of wines and light hors d'oeuvres at the Wine Thief, conveniently located in the Omni Hotel adjacent to Bob's Steak & Chop House. The Wine Tasting is Saturday, March 9, from 2 to 4 p.m. and is $40 per person. You must sign-up for both of these events by March 1.

View the tentative convention schedule at http://www.aqha.com/convention.

Members can register for the convention online. Convention pricing increases after January 31, 2019. For registration questions, please contact AQHA.

Book Hotel Rooms Now

Hotel rooms for the 2019 AQHA Convention are filling up fast. The room rate is $219 for a single/double. To receive these rates, reservations must be made prior to February 14, 2019. To book a room at the Omni Fort Worth Hotel, visit http://www.aqha.com/convention.

For detailed information and the tentative schedule http://www.aqha.com/convention.

AQHA News and information is a service of the American Quarter Horse Association. For more news and information, follow @AQHAnews on Twitter and visit http://www.aqha.com/news.

–AQHA

AQHA: Find your level for this year

When entering American Quarter Horse Association classes, AQHA exhibitors are required to provide proof of their level eligibility to show management. Exhibitors can print their level eligibility or save a digital copy on their phone for presenting to show management during the 2019 show season. To determine level eligibility for 2019, visit http://www.aqha.com/leveling to access the Web-based AQHA leveling verification system. Eligibility is for the entire year (January-December) so exhibitors only need to determine their level once per show season.

How AQHA Levels Work

AQHA youth, amateur and open divisions are divided into levels. The levels – Rookie, Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 – are formulated from an objective handicapping system that assigns exhibitors and horses to competition levels.

Classes are leveled based on exhibitor or horse records. Level eligibility is based on points with AQHA, awards earned with AQHA and other equine associations, and money earned with other equine associations.

Classes leveled by exhibitor record: youth, amateur, Select amateur and open halter, and cattle classes. Search for level eligibility for those classes by exhibitor membership ID.

Classes leveled by horse record: open division classes (excluding halter and cattle events). Search by a horse's registration number to determine its eligibility.

"AQHA levels are designed to group horses and riders with their peers of similar experience and points earned," said Pete Kyle, AQHA chief show officer. "From the bottom up, leveling is designed to improve exhibitor experiences at AQHA shows and further American Quarter Horses as competitors."

Visit http://www.aqha.com/leveling to use the level verification system. The Web application will show you the levels you and your American Quarter Horse are eligible for in 2019.

For exhibitors looking to compete in Level 1 amateur and youth classes, a Level 1 eligibility application must be filed and updated each year. All Level 1 exhibitors need to complete the Level 1 application and return it to AQHA as soon as possible. Previous Level 1 application information on file with AQHA may conflict with current eligibility, which would affect the eligibility being shown on the level verification system.

If assistance is needed in verifying level eligibility, AQHA customer service representatives are available to help at 806-376-4811.

AQHA News and information is a service of the American Quarter Horse Association. For more news and information, follow @AQHAnews on Twitter and visit http://www.aqha.com/news.

–AQHA

PRCA Standings

All-Around

1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, TX …………………..…$335,679.98

2. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, TX …………………….. $310,357.01

3. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, UT ……………….$274,723.97

4. Steven Dent, Mullen, NE …………………… $254,320.54

5. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, CA …………………… $203,408.52

6. Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, AB …………………$175,583.21

7. Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, OK ………$82,867.83

8. Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, CA ……………$71,658.54

9. Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, MS ………………$64,759.44

10. Dakota W Eldridge, Elko, NV …………………$60,005.28

11. Clayton Hass, Weatherford, TX ………………$59,712.20

12. Seth Hall, Albuquerque, NM …………………$58,753.78

13. Tanner Green, Cotulla, TX ……………………$52,394.25

14. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, OR ……………$51,350.83

15. Chance Oftedahl, Pemberton, MN ……………$49,216.16

16. Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, OK …………$47,556.22

17. Chant DeForest, Wheatland, CA ……………$39,836.99

18. Eli Lord, Sturgis, SD ……………………………$37,944.98

19. Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, OK …………………$37,554.10

20. Adam Rose, Willard, MO ………………………$37,258.95

Bareback Riding

1. Tim O'Connell, Zwingle, IA ……………………$319,801.18

2. Steven Dent, Mullen, NE ………………………$254,733.99

3. Tilden Hooper, Carthage, TX …………………$245,583.49

4. Clayton Biglow, Clements, CA ………………$245,435.25

5. Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, TX …$243,344.50

6. Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, UT ………………$240,389.73

7. Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, UT ………………$231,445.30

8. Orin Larsen, Inglis, UT …………………………$222,732.02

9. Mason Clements, Springville, UT ……………$170,317.85

10. Shane O'Connell, Rapid City, SD ……………$161,451.12

11. Bill Tutor, Huntsville, TX ………………………$154,161.97

12. Ty Breuer, Mandan, ND ………………………$127,789.16

13. Jake Brown, Cleveland, TX …………………$119,300.01

14. Wyatt Denny, Minden, NV ……………………$117,958.40

15. Will Lowe, Canyon, TX …………………………$91,516.89

16. JR Vezain, Cowley, MT ………………………$83,376.05

17. Clint Laye, Cadogan, ID ………………………$68,637.95

18. Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, MN ………………$67,792.64

19. Seth Lee Hardwick, Ranchester, WY ………$66,711.74

20. Ty Fast Taypotat, Regina, SK …………………$59,635.57

Steer Wrestling

1. Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, LA ……………$260,013.35

2. Bridger Chambers, Stevensville, MT …………$216,761.68

3. Will Lummus, West Point, MS …………………$195,182.33

4. Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, AB …………………$188,355.48

5. Scott Guenthner, Provost, AB …………………$186,726.87

6. Tyler Pearson, Louisville, OK …………………$172,990.70

7. Ty Erickson, Helena, MT ………………………$170,879.70

8. Hunter Cure, Holliday, TX ……………………$167,889.98

9. Blake Knowles, Heppner, OR …………………$162,669.26

10. Nick Guy, Sparta, CO ………………………$152,821.37

11. Jacob Talley, Keatchie, LA ……………………$145,717.33

12. Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, FL …………………$139,416.15

13. Riley Duvall, Checotah, OK …………………$128,258.31

14. Blake Mindemann, Blanchard, OK …………$127,649.56

15. Tanner Brunner, Ramona, KS ………………$98,193.32

16. Tanner Milan, Cochrane, AB …………………$72,957.35

17. Cole Edge, Durant, OK ………………………$70,876.37

18. Cameron Morman, Glen Ullin, ND ……………$69,628.67

19. Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, CA ……………………$60,662.70

20. Chason Floyd, Buffalo, SD ……………………$59,827.62

Team Roping (Headers)

1. Clay Smith, Broken Bow, TX …………………$289,921.48

2. Kaleb Driggers, Hoboken, TX …………………$272,464.48

3. Aaron Tsinigine, Tuba City, AZ …………………$212,506.03

4. Cody Snow, Los Olivos, TX ……………………$196,772.98

5. Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, OK ………………$194,835.93

6. Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, AZ ………………$193,625.61

7. Luke Brown, Rock hill, TX ……………………$154,236.78

8. Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, TX ………………$145,517.82

9. Riley Minor, Ellensburg, WA ……………………$143,592.21

10. Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, TX ………………$142,303.68

11. Tyler Wade, Terrell, TX ………………………$135,606.56

12. Clay Tryan, Billings, TX ………………………$122,784.90

13. Lane Ivy, Dublin, TX …………………………$118,919.15

14. Erich Rogers, Round Rock, AZ ……………$116,642.68

15. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, UT ………………$113,520.48

16. Spencer Mitchell, Orange Cove, CA …………$62,905.94

17. Jeff Flenniken, Caldwell, ID …………………$61,825.58

18. Coleman Proctor, Pryor, OK ……………………$61,008.29

19. Kolton Schmidt, Barrhead, AB ………………$59,346.67

20. Logan Olson, Flandreau, TX …………………$58,298.74

Team Roping (Heelers)

1. Paul Eaves, Lonedell, TX ………………………$289,921.48

2. Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, TX …$273,448.33

3. Trey Yates, Pueblo, CO ………………………$226,900.48

4. Cory Petska, Marana, AZ ……………………$200,082.49

5. Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, TX ……………$193,083.65

6. Chase Tryan, Helena, MT ……………………$174,251.75

7. Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, OK ……………$161,476.58

8. Jake Long, Coffeyville, TX ……………………$154,236.78

9. Kory Koontz, Stephenville, TX ………………$145,517.82

10. Brady Minor, Ellensburg, WA ………………$142,399.59

11. Cole Davison, Stephenville, UT ……………$128,713.11

12. Clint Summers, Lake City, TX ………………$127,755.43

13. Travis Graves, Jay, TX ………………………$118,927.76

14. Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, TX ……………$115,912.55

15. Quinn Kesler, Holden, UT ……………………$109,637.22

16. Tyler McKnight, Wells, TX ………………………$60,834.31

17. Jake Minor, Ellensburg, WA ……………………$59,847.36

18. Ryan Motes, Weatherford, TX …………………$57,260.14

19. Jonathan Torres, Ocala, TX ……………………$57,106.77

20. Reagan Ward, Edmond, OK …………………$57,049.99

Saddle Bronc Riding

1. Wade Sundell, Boxholm, IA ……………………$280,636.28

2. Rusty Wright, Milford, UT ………………………$262,434.25

3. Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, AB ………………$262,040.64

4. CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, UT ………………$256,709.77

5. Ryder Wright, Milford, UT ……………………$243,193.81

6. Cort Scheer, Elsmere, NE ……………………$238,977.28

7. Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, TX …………………$231,831.48

8. Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, TX …………………$201,162.63

9. Chase Brooks, Deer Lodge, MT ……………$168,641.29

10. Clay Elliott, Nanton, AB ………………………$148,868.42

11. Jake Wright, Milford, UT ………………………$146,479.53

12. Brody Cress, Hillsdale, WY …………………$121,587.67

13. Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, TX …………$108,747.76

14. Joey Sonnier III, New Iberia, LA ……………$102,652.51

15. Taos Muncy, Corona, NM ……………………$90,905.60

16. JJ Elshere, Hereford, SD ……………………$75,773.58

17. Spencer Wright, Milford, UT ……………………$73,766.76

18. Allen Boore, Axtell, UT …………………………$73,572.57

19. Bradley Harter, Loranger, LA …………………$65,457.29

20. Wyatt Casper, Pampa, TX ……………………$52,911.95

Tie-Down Roping

1. Caleb Smidt, Bellville, TX ………………………$232,817.07

2. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, TX ………………………$205,268.39

3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, TX ……………………$194,297.30

4. Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, TX ………………$194,056.32

5. Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, ID ………………$193,576.46

6. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, CA ………………………$186,902.51

7. Reese Riemer, Stinnett, TX ……………………$182,300.20

8. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, LA …………………$180,846.55

9. Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, WA ……………………$179,107.67

10. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, UT ………………$172,629.42

11. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, OK ………………$168,077.37

12. Marty Yates, Stephenville, TX ………………$166,501.86

13. Cooper Martin, Alma, KS ……………………$162,861.22

14. Sterling Smith, Stephenville, TX ……………$158,608.71

15. Cory Solomon, Prairie View, TX ……………$115,501.80

16. Blane Cox, Cameron, TX ………………………$77,059.49

17. Adam Gray, Seymour, TX ………………………$76,969.39

18. Tyler Milligan, Pawhuska, OK …………………$67,039.92

19. Scott Kormos, Teague, TX ……………………$66,962.77

20. Ty Harris, San Angelo, TX ……………………$62,751.78

Steer Roping

1. Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX …………$122,930.93

2. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, TX ………………………$113,156.90

3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, TX ……………………$105,118.17

4. Rocky Patterson, Pratt, KS ……………………$97,558.76

5. Chris Glover, Keenesburg, CO …………………$88,845.90

6. Cody Lee, Gatesville, TX ………………………$83,975.51

7. Bryce Davis, Ovalo, TX …………………………$80,787.91

8. Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, TX ……………………$78,698.03

9. Chet Herren, Pawhuska, OK …………………$77,145.02

10. J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, TX …………………$75,353.34

11. Garrett Hale, Snyder, TX ………………………$66,132.61

12. Brodie Poppino, Big Cabin, OK ………………$64,197.25

13. Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, TX ………………$63,344.64

14. Tony Reina, Wharton, TX ……………………$59,292.18

15. Will Gasperson, Decatur, TX …………………$48,055.88

16. Roger Branch, Wellston, OK …………………$40,225.15

17. Jim Locke, Miami, TX …………………………$37,042.31

18. Corey Ross, Liberty Hill, TX …………………$33,631.36

19. Shay Good, Midland, TX ………………………$28,457.41

20. Jason Evans, Glen Rose, TX …………………$26,134.11

Bull Riding

1. Sage Steele Kimzey, Strong City, TX …………$415,262.82

2. Chase Dougherty, Canby, OR …………………$342,099.47

3. Joe Frost, Randlett, UT ………………………$252,053.72

4. Parker Breding, Edgar, MT ……………………$241,732.34

5. Jeff Askey, Athens, TX …………………………$225,623.90

6. Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, ID …………$213,801.47

7. Dustin Boquet, Bourg, LA ……………………$196,933.67

8. Garrett Tribble, Bristow, OK …………………$180,481.98

9. Eli Vastbinder, Union Grove, NC ……………$173,370.66

10. Koby Radley, Montpelier, LA …………………$160,071.73

11. Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, UT ………………$146,910.40

12. Trey Benton III, Rock Island, TX ……………$141,393.14

13. Cole Melancon, Liberty, TX …………………$138,037.59

14. Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, TX …………$135,469.24

15. Trevor Kastner, Roff, OK ……………………$104,395.88

16. J.W. Harris, Goldthwaite, TX …………………$93,768.80

17. Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, TX ……………$92,182.88


18. Jordan Wacey Spears, Redding, OR …………$91,009.28

19. Clayton Sellars, Friutlandpark, TX ……………$90,863.20

20. Brady Portenier, Caldwell, ID …………………$86,418.78

Barrel Racing

1. Ivy Conrado, Nowata, OK………………………$19,983.29

2. Lacinda Rose, Willard, MO………………………$14,635.83

3. Ericka Nelson, Century, FL………………………$13,938.80

4. Kristen Spratt, Lysite, WY………………………$12,048.70

5. Sabra O'Quinn (G), Ocala, FL…………………$11,963.08

6. Kylie Weast, Comanche, OK……………………$11,520.66

7. Dona Rule, Minco, OK……………………………$9,749.57

8. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, SD………………………$9,173.82

9. Jackie Ganter, Abilene, TX………………………$9,115.61

10. Leia Pluemer, Las Lunas, NM……………………$8,283.25

11. Chloe Gray, Yatesville, GA………………………$8,067.98

12. Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, CA……………………$7,961.15

13. Tonia Forsberg, Fillmore, CA……………………$7,548.05

14. Jimmie Smith, McDade, TX……………………$7,145.12

15. Stephanie Fryar, Waco, TX………………………$7,120.21

16. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, TX……………$7,076.11

17. Taci Bettis, Round Top, TX………………………$6,865.32

18. Emily Miller, Weatherford, OK……………………$6,775.36

19. Nicole Love, Morton, MS………………………$6,756.25

20. Jessica Routier, Buffalo, SD……………………$6,721.13

PRCA Standings

All-Around

1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, TX …………………..…$335,679.98

2. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, TX …………………….. $310,357.01

3. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, UT ……………….$274,723.97

4. Steven Dent, Mullen, NE …………………… $254,320.54

5. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, CA …………………… $203,408.52

6. Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, AB …………………$175,583.21

7. Paul David Tierney, Oklahoma City, OK ………$82,867.83

8. Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, CA ……………$71,658.54

9. Marcus Theriot, Poplarville, MS ………………$64,759.44

10. Dakota W Eldridge, Elko, NV …………………$60,005.28

11. Clayton Hass, Weatherford, TX ………………$59,712.20

12. Seth Hall, Albuquerque, NM …………………$58,753.78

13. Tanner Green, Cotulla, TX ……………………$52,394.25

14. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, OR ……………$51,350.83

15. Chance Oftedahl, Pemberton, MN ……………$49,216.16

16. Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, OK …………$47,556.22

17. Chant DeForest, Wheatland, CA ……………$39,836.99

18. Eli Lord, Sturgis, SD ……………………………$37,944.98

19. Trell Etbauer, Goodwell, OK …………………$37,554.10

20. Adam Rose, Willard, MO ………………………$37,258.95

Bareback Riding

1. Tim O'Connell, Zwingle, IA ……………………$319,801.18

2. Steven Dent, Mullen, NE ………………………$254,733.99

3. Tilden Hooper, Carthage, TX …………………$245,583.49

4. Clayton Biglow, Clements, CA ………………$245,435.25

5. Richmond Champion, The Woodlands, TX …$243,344.50

6. Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, UT ………………$240,389.73

7. Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, UT ………………$231,445.30

8. Orin Larsen, Inglis, UT …………………………$222,732.02

9. Mason Clements, Springville, UT ……………$170,317.85

10. Shane O'Connell, Rapid City, SD ……………$161,451.12

11. Bill Tutor, Huntsville, TX ………………………$154,161.97

12. Ty Breuer, Mandan, ND ………………………$127,789.16

13. Jake Brown, Cleveland, TX …………………$119,300.01

14. Wyatt Denny, Minden, NV ……………………$117,958.40

15. Will Lowe, Canyon, TX …………………………$91,516.89

16. JR Vezain, Cowley, MT ………………………$83,376.05

17. Clint Laye, Cadogan, ID ………………………$68,637.95

18. Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, MN ………………$67,792.64

19. Seth Lee Hardwick, Ranchester, WY ………$66,711.74

20. Ty Fast Taypotat, Regina, SK …………………$59,635.57

Steer Wrestling

1. Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, LA ……………$260,013.35

2. Bridger Chambers, Stevensville, MT …………$216,761.68

3. Will Lummus, West Point, MS …………………$195,182.33

4. Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, AB …………………$188,355.48

5. Scott Guenthner, Provost, AB …………………$186,726.87

6. Tyler Pearson, Louisville, OK …………………$172,990.70

7. Ty Erickson, Helena, MT ………………………$170,879.70

8. Hunter Cure, Holliday, TX ……………………$167,889.98

9. Blake Knowles, Heppner, OR …………………$162,669.26

10. Nick Guy, Sparta, CO ………………………$152,821.37

11. Jacob Talley, Keatchie, LA ……………………$145,717.33

12. Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, FL …………………$139,416.15

13. Riley Duvall, Checotah, OK …………………$128,258.31

14. Blake Mindemann, Blanchard, OK …………$127,649.56

15. Tanner Brunner, Ramona, KS ………………$98,193.32

16. Tanner Milan, Cochrane, AB …………………$72,957.35

17. Cole Edge, Durant, OK ………………………$70,876.37

18. Cameron Morman, Glen Ullin, ND ……………$69,628.67

19. Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, CA ……………………$60,662.70

20. Chason Floyd, Buffalo, SD ……………………$59,827.62

Team Roping (Headers)

1. Clay Smith, Broken Bow, TX …………………$289,921.48

2. Kaleb Driggers, Hoboken, TX …………………$272,464.48

3. Aaron Tsinigine, Tuba City, AZ …………………$212,506.03

4. Cody Snow, Los Olivos, TX ……………………$196,772.98

5. Bubba Buckaloo, Kingston, OK ………………$194,835.93

6. Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, AZ ………………$193,625.61

7. Luke Brown, Rock hill, TX ……………………$154,236.78

8. Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, TX ………………$145,517.82

9. Riley Minor, Ellensburg, WA ……………………$143,592.21

10. Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, TX ………………$142,303.68

11. Tyler Wade, Terrell, TX ………………………$135,606.56

12. Clay Tryan, Billings, TX ………………………$122,784.90

13. Lane Ivy, Dublin, TX …………………………$118,919.15

14. Erich Rogers, Round Rock, AZ ……………$116,642.68

15. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, UT ………………$113,520.48

16. Spencer Mitchell, Orange Cove, CA …………$62,905.94

17. Jeff Flenniken, Caldwell, ID …………………$61,825.58

18. Coleman Proctor, Pryor, OK ……………………$61,008.29

19. Kolton Schmidt, Barrhead, AB ………………$59,346.67

20. Logan Olson, Flandreau, TX …………………$58,298.74

Team Roping (Heelers)

1. Paul Eaves, Lonedell, TX ………………………$289,921.48

2. Junior Nogueira, Presidente Prudente, TX …$273,448.33

3. Trey Yates, Pueblo, CO ………………………$226,900.48

4. Cory Petska, Marana, AZ ……………………$200,082.49

5. Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, TX ……………$193,083.65

6. Chase Tryan, Helena, MT ……………………$174,251.75

7. Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, OK ……………$161,476.58

8. Jake Long, Coffeyville, TX ……………………$154,236.78

9. Kory Koontz, Stephenville, TX ………………$145,517.82

10. Brady Minor, Ellensburg, WA ………………$142,399.59

11. Cole Davison, Stephenville, UT ……………$128,713.11

12. Clint Summers, Lake City, TX ………………$127,755.43

13. Travis Graves, Jay, TX ………………………$118,927.76

14. Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, TX ……………$115,912.55

15. Quinn Kesler, Holden, UT ……………………$109,637.22

16. Tyler McKnight, Wells, TX ………………………$60,834.31

17. Jake Minor, Ellensburg, WA ……………………$59,847.36

18. Ryan Motes, Weatherford, TX …………………$57,260.14

19. Jonathan Torres, Ocala, TX ……………………$57,106.77

20. Reagan Ward, Edmond, OK …………………$57,049.99

Saddle Bronc Riding

1. Wade Sundell, Boxholm, IA ……………………$280,636.28

2. Rusty Wright, Milford, UT ………………………$262,434.25

3. Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, AB ………………$262,040.64

4. CoBurn Bradshaw, Beaver, UT ………………$256,709.77

5. Ryder Wright, Milford, UT ……………………$243,193.81

6. Cort Scheer, Elsmere, NE ……………………$238,977.28

7. Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, TX …………………$231,831.48

8. Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, TX …………………$201,162.63

9. Chase Brooks, Deer Lodge, MT ……………$168,641.29

10. Clay Elliott, Nanton, AB ………………………$148,868.42

11. Jake Wright, Milford, UT ………………………$146,479.53

12. Brody Cress, Hillsdale, WY …………………$121,587.67

13. Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, TX …………$108,747.76

14. Joey Sonnier III, New Iberia, LA ……………$102,652.51

15. Taos Muncy, Corona, NM ……………………$90,905.60

16. JJ Elshere, Hereford, SD ……………………$75,773.58

17. Spencer Wright, Milford, UT ……………………$73,766.76

18. Allen Boore, Axtell, UT …………………………$73,572.57

19. Bradley Harter, Loranger, LA …………………$65,457.29

20. Wyatt Casper, Pampa, TX ……………………$52,911.95

Tie-Down Roping

1. Caleb Smidt, Bellville, TX ………………………$232,817.07

2. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, TX ………………………$205,268.39

3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, TX ……………………$194,297.30

4. Tyson Durfey, Weatherford, TX ………………$194,056.32

5. Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, ID ………………$193,576.46

6. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, CA ………………………$186,902.51

7. Reese Riemer, Stinnett, TX ……………………$182,300.20

8. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, LA …………………$180,846.55

9. Jake Pratt, Ellensburg, WA ……………………$179,107.67

10. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, UT ………………$172,629.42

11. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, OK ………………$168,077.37

12. Marty Yates, Stephenville, TX ………………$166,501.86

13. Cooper Martin, Alma, KS ……………………$162,861.22

14. Sterling Smith, Stephenville, TX ……………$158,608.71

15. Cory Solomon, Prairie View, TX ……………$115,501.80

16. Blane Cox, Cameron, TX ………………………$77,059.49

17. Adam Gray, Seymour, TX ………………………$76,969.39

18. Tyler Milligan, Pawhuska, OK …………………$67,039.92

19. Scott Kormos, Teague, TX ……………………$66,962.77

20. Ty Harris, San Angelo, TX ……………………$62,751.78

Steer Roping

1. Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX …………$122,930.93

2. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, TX ………………………$113,156.90

3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, TX ……………………$105,118.17

4. Rocky Patterson, Pratt, KS ……………………$97,558.76

5. Chris Glover, Keenesburg, CO …………………$88,845.90

6. Cody Lee, Gatesville, TX ………………………$83,975.51

7. Bryce Davis, Ovalo, TX …………………………$80,787.91

8. Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, TX ……………………$78,698.03

9. Chet Herren, Pawhuska, OK …………………$77,145.02

10. J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, TX …………………$75,353.34

11. Garrett Hale, Snyder, TX ………………………$66,132.61

12. Brodie Poppino, Big Cabin, OK ………………$64,197.25

13. Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, TX ………………$63,344.64

14. Tony Reina, Wharton, TX ……………………$59,292.18

15. Will Gasperson, Decatur, TX …………………$48,055.88

16. Roger Branch, Wellston, OK …………………$40,225.15

17. Jim Locke, Miami, TX …………………………$37,042.31

18. Corey Ross, Liberty Hill, TX …………………$33,631.36

19. Shay Good, Midland, TX ………………………$28,457.41

20. Jason Evans, Glen Rose, TX …………………$26,134.11

Bull Riding

1. Sage Steele Kimzey, Strong City, TX …………$415,262.82

2. Chase Dougherty, Canby, OR …………………$342,099.47

3. Joe Frost, Randlett, UT ………………………$252,053.72

4. Parker Breding, Edgar, MT ……………………$241,732.34

5. Jeff Askey, Athens, TX …………………………$225,623.90

6. Roscoe Jarboe, New Plymouth, ID …………$213,801.47

7. Dustin Boquet, Bourg, LA ……………………$196,933.67

8. Garrett Tribble, Bristow, OK …………………$180,481.98

9. Eli Vastbinder, Union Grove, NC ……………$173,370.66

10. Koby Radley, Montpelier, LA …………………$160,071.73

11. Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, UT ………………$146,910.40

12. Trey Benton III, Rock Island, TX ……………$141,393.14

13. Cole Melancon, Liberty, TX …………………$138,037.59

14. Boudreaux Campbell, Crockett, TX …………$135,469.24

15. Trevor Kastner, Roff, OK ……………………$104,395.88

16. J.W. Harris, Goldthwaite, TX …………………$93,768.80

17. Elliot Jacoby, Fredericksburg, TX ……………$92,182.88


18. Jordan Wacey Spears, Redding, OR …………$91,009.28

19. Clayton Sellars, Friutlandpark, TX ……………$90,863.20

20. Brady Portenier, Caldwell, ID …………………$86,418.78

Barrel Racing

1. Ivy Conrado, Nowata, OK………………………$19,983.29

2. Lacinda Rose, Willard, MO………………………$14,635.83

3. Ericka Nelson, Century, FL………………………$13,938.80

4. Kristen Spratt, Lysite, WY………………………$12,048.70

5. Sabra O'Quinn (G), Ocala, FL…………………$11,963.08

6. Kylie Weast, Comanche, OK……………………$11,520.66

7. Dona Rule, Minco, OK……………………………$9,749.57

8. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, SD………………………$9,173.82

9. Jackie Ganter, Abilene, TX………………………$9,115.61

10. Leia Pluemer, Las Lunas, NM……………………$8,283.25

11. Chloe Gray, Yatesville, GA………………………$8,067.98

12. Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, CA…??………………$7,961.15

13. Tonia Forsberg, Fillmore, CA……………………$7,548.05

14. Jimmie Smith, McDade, TX……………………$7,145.12

15. Stephanie Fryar, Waco, TX………………………$7,120.21

16. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, TX……………$7,076.11

17. Taci Bettis, Round Top, TX………………………$6,865.32

18. Emily Miller, Weatherford, OK……………………$6,775.36

19. Nicole Love, Morton, MS………………………$6,756.25

20. Jessica Routier, Buffalo, SD……………………$6,721.13

Wrangler NFR 2018 Daily Round Results

Jump to results:
Bareback
Steer Wrestling
Team Roping (Headers)
Team Roping (Heelers)
Saddle Bronc Riding
Tie-Down Roping
Barrel Racing
Bull Riding

Bareback


Steer Wrestling


Team Roping (Headers)


Team Roping (Heelers)


Saddle Bronc Riding


Tie-Down Roping


Barrel Racing


Bull Riding

 

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