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West Central Cattlemen’s to offer meetings throughout end of month

A series of four West Central Cattlemen's meetings will be held in the area during the month of January. The topics covered will address reducing cow costs. The locations and times are as follows:

· January 22, Hitchcock County Fairgrounds, Culbertson NE 6 pm CT

· January 23, Veterans Memorial Hall, Arthur NE 6 pm MT

· January 24, Community Center, Brady 6 pm CT

· January 31, McPherson County Fairgrounds 6 pm CT

Speakers and topics are as follows:

· Seeded Forages for Complementary Grazing by Troy Walz, Nebraska Beef Extension Educator

· Managing Feed Costs by Randy Saner, Nebraska Beef Extension Educator

· Cow Size and Efficiency by Travis Mulliniks, Range Beef Nutrition Specialist, West Central Research & Extension Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

· Benchmarking as a Management Tool by Robert Tigner, Agricultural Systems Economist Educator

· Grazing Management Principles that Make a Difference by Jerry Volesky, Range and Forage Specialist, West Central Research & Extension Center, University of Nebraska- Lincoln

To register contact your local Extension Office or Randy Saner by e-mail randy.saner@unl.edu or by phone at 308-532-2683. The cost is $15 per person if pre-registered or $20 at the door. An evening meal will be served at all locations.

–UNL Extension

Farm Bureau delegates set 2019 policy

NEW ORLEANS – Farmer and rancher delegates to the American Farm Bureau Federation's 100th Annual Convention today adopted policies to guide the organization's work during its centennial year on key topics such as farm bill implementation, cell-cultured food products, trade, rural broadband access and rural mental health programs.

"As our organization has done for the last 100 years, delegates from across the nation came together to express a unified grassroots voice on issues vital to the success of our farms, ranches and rural communities," American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall said. "It was fitting to have President Trump and numerous members of Congress among our attendees as we kicked off our centennial celebration. We continue to face a challenging farm economy and we stand ready to work with Congress and the Trump administration to address the issues important to our farm and ranch families."

One of the Montana Farm Bureau policies that had been sent to AFBF for consideration was to support immediate repeal of the harmful Waters of the U.S. ((WOTUS) rule.

"The great news is WOTUS was repealed in the time between our convention in November and the American Farm Bureau Annual Meeting in New Orleans," said Montana Farm Bureau President Hans McPherson. "What's so impressive about Farm Bureau is policy truly comes from grassroots starting with the county Farm Bureaus."

Government Shutdown

Delegates urged the administration and Congress to work together to end the government shutdown as soon as possible. The current shutdown means farmers and ranchers are being delayed in securing loans and crop insurance as well as disaster and trade assistance. The impasse has also delayed implementation of important provisions of the farm bill.

Trade

Delegates voted to favor negotiations to resolve trade disputes, rather than the use of tariffs or withdrawal from agreements. They also voted to support the United States' entry into the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Cell-based Food

Delegates adopted a comprehensive policy to support innovation in cell-based food products while ensuring a level playing field for traditional protein. Delegates affirmed that the Agriculture Department is best equipped to be the primary regulator of new cell-based products as it encouraged USDA to utilize the Food and Drug Administration's expertise in food safety. The policy also calls for complete and accurate product labels to ensure that consumers have all the pertinent information they need.

Rural Broadband

Delegates supported improved broadband coverage maps through better data and third-party provider verification. AFBF will work with the Federal Communications Commission to address map inaccuracies.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health

Delegates supported increased funding for programs and facilities for the treatment of substance abuse and mental health issues. Delegates also voted to support funding for the Farm and Ranch Assistance Network, which was included in the 2018 farm bill. AFBF will urge appropriations committees to fund this program, which is critical to address the mental health issues faced by many farmers, ranchers and other rural Americans.

–Montana Farm Bureau

Obituary: Garnet Gaaskjolen

Garnet Gaaskjolen

1924-2019

Garnet passed away on Saturday, January 12, 2019 at the Five Counties Nursing Home in Lemmon, SD.

Garnet (Carmichael) Gaaskjolen was born in Beulah, ND on August 13, 1924 to James and Mary Carmichael with only a midwife attending the birth. When Garnet was 3 years old, they moved to a place north of Faith, which would be the first of numerous moves. Most of the locations they called home were in the Meadow area with one of them being a house SW of the Thunder Butte Bridge which they lost to a fire. Her father then built a sod house on the same location.

When Garnet became school age, she attended various country schools until her seventh grade at which time she moved to Salem, SD to live with her Aunt and Uncle to attend school. Upon graduation from the 8th grade she stayed another year due to the depression, helping them on the farm doing a lot of hard work.

Occasionally she got to town on Saturday night and got a dime to spend, which wasn't all bad as it bought an ice cream cone and a candy bar. Candy bars were a lot bigger then than they are today or at least she thought so. On occasion her folks would send her a couple dollars of spending money and there was an Alden's Catalog from which you could order dress material. Garnet would send for 3 yards for 9 cents a yard. On arrival she would go early in the a.m. to her twin cousins' home and go home that night with a nice dress as the twins were really good at sewing. On a sadder note, while living in Salem, Garnet got notice her mother had died suddenly in the beauty operator's chair.

In 1940 Garnet went back to Lemmon to live with her dad. She got a job working for Mrs. Earl Papke. She worked from 7 a.m. until late afternoon for $3.00 a week.

Garnet and Vergil were married on March 10, 1942. In their early years there was lots of land for sale but there was no money. Vergil's dad finally loaned them a little money and they bought a quarter or two for 50 cents an acre and then managed to get ahead enough to buy some for a $1 an acre. In 1949 Vergil and Garnet built a new house near Meadow, SD and after Vergil's passing Garnet built a new house near the highway in 1986. She then sold the remainder of the ranch to Keith and Roxi.

In 2001 Garnet moved to an apartment in Faith where she resided until December 2018. Garnet entered the Five Counties Nursing Home in late December 2018.

Garnet will be remembered for all the angel food birthday cakes and Easter cakes she made for her grandchildren over the years. Each Christmas children/grandchildren received cookies that she had spent many hours preparing. You never stopped at Garnet's without being offered angel food cake, caramel rolls, or cookies and a hot cup of coffee.

One of Garnet's greatest enjoyments was attending Sunday Services at the Faith Christian Center and the fellowship that followed.

She was preceded in death by her husband Vergil Gaaskjolen. Surviving are her son Keith (Roxi) Gaaskjolen; three daughters, Arlene (Darwin) Oliver, Lemmon, SD, Lois (Vaughn) Meyer, Reva, SD, and Wava (Bruce) Gotfredson, Newel, SD; 11 grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren, and one sister-in-law Esther Carmichael.

Funeral services for Garnet Gaaskjolen, age 94, of Faith, SD, will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 at the Prince of Peace Chapel of the Evanson Jensen Funeral Home in Lemmon, SD. Pastor Terry Bottjen will officiate, with burial to follow in the Greenhill Cemetery at Lemmon.

Visitation will be one hour prior to services at the Funeral Home on Friday.

‘Horses are a good part of life’

The Baltezores keep a low profile.

So low, in fact, that when the local Beresford, S.D. newspaper heard of them being honored by the South Dakota Quarter Horse Association for their contributions to the rodeo and quarter horse industry, the paper asked John and Cindy, "what do you do out there?"

Actually, they've done a lot.

Cindy and John Baltezore briefly met at one of the Sunday afternoon ropings Cindy's dad organized at the ranch, but it wasn't till their days at South Dakota State University that they began dating. They were both involved with the rodeo club and the Little International Ag Exposition during their years in Brookings.

At SDSU, Cindy dedicated much of her time to her studies. She ran barrels and served as the girls rodeo team captain. John, a bull rider, tie-down roper and steer wrestler, served as the president of the National Inter-Collegiate Rodeo Association president in 1971. They married while still in college. John had worked for Jim and Julie Sutton and their rodeo company before coming to SDSU; he credits them for encouraging him to finish his college studies.

John graduated from college in 1971 and Cindy a year later. Horses were their main focus. They moved to Beresford, Cindy's home town, and "we set up our own deal," she said. Their "deal" was Lincoln stables, a training and breeding facility.

For a time, John trained horses for a host of clients and his handiness with a rope helped him make AQHA champion roping horses. They took stallions to horse shows, got their required roping points, showed at the World Show, all the things that go into making a quarter horse operation successful. They made several AQHA champions, qualified and competed at many World Shows, and had a World Champion appaloosa calf roping horse.

All the while, they had two daughters, Aimee and Heidi. Cindy was busy putting on a kids camp for barrels and poles each summer. She also got a colt ready each year to enter the futurity in Ft. Smith, Ark. And she was pro rodeoing, too, barrel racing across the Badlands Circuit.

In the 1990s, as John and Cindy continued to ride, train, rope and futurity theirs and customer's horses, they started their own breeding program in 1991 with a roan stallion, Fixin To Win.

Fixin to Win, their first stallion, was the backbone of the program. He was adept at both the roping and the barrel racing events, and had his register of merit in several different events. "He was a favorite," Cindy said.

A few years later, John and Jim Loiseau partnered on the beautiful palomino colt PC Frenchmans Mark. His offspring have been fabulous in the arena. John roped on Frenchmans Mark, and another of his colts went to Italy, where he was a barrel racing champion for Paul Humphrey. Another Frenchmans Mark carried the 2018 Indian National Finals Rodeo barrel racer to the winner's circle, and countless other Frenchmans Mark offspring are steer wrestling, roping, and barrel racing in arenas across the area. They include French Flash Charm, Frenchmans Drifty Go, Mark Me Happy, Frosted Sunman, Frenchmans Tanman, KC Frenchmans Jack, KC Frenchmans Baby, I Saws A Mark, French Marked Deck, NZ Frenchmans Kirk, Marks Classic Note, Frenchmans Daizee, Snippys French Mark, Jus Gettin It Done, Osages Destiny, Sheza Frenchman, SL Frenchmans Bar, Royal Fast Frenchman, Dakota War Dance, Le Hemme Win, Flash That French, Frenchmans Gold Charm, MLS Shaken Things Up, Chant N French, and TRM Heza Frenchman.

Through this time, the girls were busy in 4-H and S.D. High School Rodeo. Cindy made sure they got to compete, and the girls started "stealing" their mom's horses.

Cindy competed at twelve consecutive Badlands Circuit Finals Rodeos, and in 1990, she and John both won a Badlands Circuit title, qualifying them to go to the Dodge National Circuit Finals in Pocatello, Idaho. John's win was in the team roping; he roped with Paul Tierney in Pocatello.

In 2004, the Baltezores added a black stallion, Holy Bart, by leading barrel sire Dash Ta Fame out of High on Coaly. Cindy won the 2014 WPRA world championship futurity title with Famous Drift Go, whose sire is Holy Bart.

The Baltezores' program was never huge. Cindy did the AI, the shipping, and the foaling. "We do it on a small scale, because we don't have extra help."

Their bloodlines lead to trainability in their offspring. "All different kinds of people have done well on our horses," Cindy said. Their main focus has been rodeo horses, though. Although John loved the tie-down roping, several shoulder replacements and knee surgeries don't allow him to anymore. Cindy continues to run barrels; she was on her way towards another Badlands Circuit Finals qualification last year till her horse got injured. She does more futurities now, than barrel races, because of less travel with the futurities.

Their horses usually don't even make the Baltezore website. "I can't keep horses long enough to advertise them," Cindy said. "We are lucky. We don't have to advertise our colts. People come to us." And many of them are repeat customers. "This year, we sold all our babies, and every (customer) was a repeat buyer."

The Baltezores have raised not only good horses, but good kids, too. Cindy and John are proud of their daughters. They're hard workers, and have great people skills. "They will look you in the eye, and shake your hand, and tell you they're glad to meet you, and mean it," Cindy said.

The horses are a "good part of life," Cindy said. "They make you want to get up" out of bed. When the whole family gets together, they talk horses. "At family gatherings, my mom talks horses, my dad talks horses, my husband talks horses, my daughters talk horses," Cindy said. "My sons-in-law don't but they're getting there."

"Horses make us happy."

PRCA Standings Jan. 17, 2019

ALL AROUND

1. Bart Brunson, Terry, MS……………………………$12,385.94

2. Hank Hollenbeck, Molt, MT……………………………$9,181.07

3. Chance Oftedahl, Pemberton, MN……………………………$8,873.61

4. Delon Parker, Worden, MT……………………………$8,586.07

5. Darren Morgan, Fort Ann, NY……………………………$8,001.98

BAREBACK

1. Taylor Broussard, Estherwood, LA……………………………$16,412.83

2. Jared Keylon, Uniontown, KS……………………………$15,920.50

3. Bill Tutor, Huntsville, TX……………………………$14,591.87

4. Jamie Howlett, Rapid City, TX……………………………$13,483.19

5. Trenten Montero, Winnemucca, NV……………………………$13,235.12

6. Tristan Hansen, Dillon, MT……………………………$12,903.62

7. Winn Ratliff, Leesville, LA……………………………$12,803.84

8. Blake Smith, Zap, ND……………………………$12,718.95

9. Pascal Isabelle, Okotoks, AB……………………………$11,641.59

10. R.C. Landingham, Hat Creek, CA……………………….$11,115.69

11. Matthew Smith, Saraland, AL……………………………$11,031.63

12. Logan Patterson, Kim, CO……………………………$9,681.63

13. Jesse Pope, Marshall, MO……………………………$8,911.57

14. Tilden Hooper, Carthage, TX……………………………$8,814.80

15. Clayton Biglow, Clements, CA………………………..$8,617.87

16. Blade Elliott, Centreville, AL……………………….$8,487.13

17. Tim O'Connell, Zwingle, IA……………………………$8,363.16

18. Ty Breuer, Mandan, ND……………………………$8,057.84

19. Tanner Phipps, Dalton, GA……………………………$8,032.66

20. Mark Kreder, Collinsville, OK……………………………$7,234.27

STEER WRESTLING

1. Cameron Morman, Glen Ullin, ND……………………………$12,917.88

2. Scott Guenthner, Provost, AB……………………………$12,278.88

3. Blake Mindemann, Blanchard, OK……………………………$12,026.13

4. Tyler Waguespack, Gonzales, LA……………………………$11,193.23

5. Jacob Talley, Keatchie, LA……………………………$11,035.67

6. Stetson Jorgensen, Blackfoot, ID……………………………$10,516.59

7. Jacob Edler, State Center, IA……………………………$9,993.53

8. Riley Duvall, Checotah, OK……………………………$9,531.18

9. Chason Floyd, Buffalo, SD……………………………$9,006.00

10. Bridger Chambers, Stevensville, MT……………………..$8,894.17

11. Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, TX………………………….$8,471.50

12. Gary Gilbert, Springtown, TX……………………………$7,952.01

13. Cody Metsker, Taylorville, IL……………………………$7,875.06

14. Blaine Jones, Templeton, CA……………………………$7,728.65

15. John Leinaweaver, Orrtanna, PA……………………………$7,501.86

16. Ty Erickson, Helena, MT……………………………$6,870.86

17. Tanner Milan, Cochrane, AB……………………………$6,598.89

18. Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, CA…………………………$6,590.18

19. Don Payne, Stephenville, TX……………………………$6,355.04

20. Clayton Hass, Weatherford, TX……………………………$6,229.90

TEAM ROPING HEADERS

1. Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, TN……………………………$12,025.01

2. Dustin Egusquiza, Mariana, FL……………………………$11,774.17

3. Billy Bob Brown, Carbon, TX……………………………$10,878.57

4. Cody Snow, Los Olivos, CA……………………………$10,658.63

5. Tyler Wade, Terrell, TX……………………………$10,129.72

6. Eric Fabian, Gansevoort, NY……………………………$9,424.88

7. Jacob Dagenhart, Statesville, NC………………………$8,654.43

8. Kaleb Driggers, Hoboken, GA……………………………$8,005.10

9. Bart Brunson, Terry, MS……………………………$7,816.51

10. Eli Lord, Sturgis, SD……………………………$7,510.58

11. Brady Tryan, Huntley, MT……………………………$7,160.75

12. Will Clark, Erin, TN……………………………$7,120.32

13. Clay Smith, Broken Bow, OK……………………………$7,117.64

14. Tyrell Moody, Letcher, SD……………………………$6,988.63

15. Pace Freed, Chubbuck, ID……………………………$6,811.03

16. Keven Daniel, Franklin, TN……………………………$6,394.80

17. Tanner Saunders, Hudson, NC……………………………$6,187.57

18. Ryan Reed, Modesto, CA……………………………$6,066.18

19. Chris Francis, Las Vegas, NM………………………..$6,059.17

20. Kal Fuller, Bozeman, MT……………………………$6,025.09

TEAM ROPING HEELERS

1. Joseph Harrison, Overbrook, OK……………………………$13,113.14

2. Kory Koontz, Stephenville, TX……………………………$11,774.17

3. Jake Edwards, Fort Ann, NY……………………………$11,076.30

4. Hunter Koch, Walters, OK……………………………$10,878.57

5. Wesley Thorp, Throckmorton, TX………………………..$10,658.63

6. Ryan Motes, Weatherford, TX…………………………… $10,129.72

7. Levi Lord, Sturgis, SD…………………………… $9,999.45

8. Zack Mabry, Piedmont, AL…………………………… $8,654.43

9. Junior Nogueira, Burleson, TX……………………………$8,005.10

10. Wesley Brunson, Terry, MS…………………………… $7,636.05

11. Jake Long, Coffeyville, KS…………………………… $7,117.64

12. Rory Brown, Edgemont, SD…………………………… $6,988.63

13. Jade Anderson, Genola, UT……………………………$6,811.03

14. Chase Boekhaus, Rolla, KS……………………………$6,744.79

15. Brad Culpepper, Sylvester, GA…………………………$6,394.80

16. James Arnold, Midway, TX……………………………$6,315.97

17. Monty Joe Petska, Turlock, CA…………………………$6,066.18

18. Cade Passig, Las Vegas, NM……………………………$6,059.17

19. JC Flake, Laramie, WY……………………………$5,868.71

20. Kory Mytty, Lolo, MT……………………………$5,738.19

SADDLE BRONC

1. Isaac Diaz, Desdemona, TX……………………………$22,466.12

2. Jacobs Crawley, Boerne, TX……………………………$22,266.78

3. Chase Brooks, Deer Lodge, MT……………………………$22,091.39

4. Bradley Harter, Loranger, LA……………………………$17,471.70

5. Spencer Wright, Milford, UT……………………………$10,290.44

6. Joey Sonnier, New Iberia, LA……………………………$9,203.57

7. Jesse Kruse, Great Falls, MT……………………………$9,181.08

8. Jake Finlay, Goondiwindi, QL……………………………$8,667.71

9. Dean Wadsworth, Buffalo Gap, TX……………………………$8,605.41

10. Cole Elshere, Faith, SD……………………………$8,566.93

11. Clovis Crane, Lebanon, PA……………………………$8,410.05

12. Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, TX………………………$7,518.31

13. Hardy Braden, Welch, OK……………………………$7,402.89

14. Ross Griffin, Tularosa, NM……………………………$7,279.68

15. Leon Fountain, Socorro, NM……………………………$6,880.43

16. Taos Muncy, Corona, NM……………………………$6,768.14

17. Jake Wright, Milford, UT……………………………$6,541.65

18. JJ Elshere, Hereford, SD……………………………$6,463.38

19. Joe Farren, Cottondale, FL……………………………$6,307.52

20. Logan Allen, Mount Ayr, IA……………………………$6,252.29

TIE DOWN ROPING

1. Tyson Durfey, Brock, TX……………………………$34,524.46

2. Westyn Hughes, Caldwell, TX……………………………$19,437.44

3. Adam Gray, Seymour, TX……………………………$10,653.14

4. Marty Yates, Stephenville, TX……………………………$10,500.00

5. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, LA……………………………$10,067.20

6. Justin Thigpen, Waycross, GA……………………………$9,803.52

7. Cooper Martin, Alma, KS……………………………$8,810.10

8. Tim Naylor, Hancock, MD……………………………$8,502.12

9. Haven Meged, Miles City, MT……………………………$8,350.54

10. Lane Livingston, Seymour, TX……………………………$8,011.57

11. Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, CA………………………..$7,938.68

12. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, CA………………………………7,811.98

13. Tyler Milligan, Pawhuska, OK……………………………$7,779.93

14. Clint Kindred, Oral, SD……………………………$7,317.92

15. Blake Ash, Aurora, MO……………………………$7,312.56

16. Ty Harris, San Angelo, TX……………………………$6,981.72

17. Taylor Santos, Creston, CA……………………………$6,602.59

18. Bradleychance Hays, Whitefish, MT………………………$6,311.99

19. Cooper Mathews, Cleburne, TX……………………………$6,131.60

20. Justin Smith, Leesville, LA……………………………$6,071.89

STEER ROPING

1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, TX……………………………$20,718.37

2. Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, TX……………………………$18,624.02

3. Roger Branch, Wellston, OK……………………………$9,265.51

4. Garrett Hale, Snyder, TX……………………………$9,221.36

5. Shay Good, Abilene, TX……………………………$9,025.98

6. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, TX……………………………$9,011.26

7. Chris Glover, Keenesburg, CO……………………………$8,359.89

8. Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, TX………………………$8,303.37

9. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, SD……………………………$5,776.31

10. Cole Patterson, Pratt, KS……………………………$5,551.00

11. Ora Taton, Rapid City, SD……………………………$5,346.86

12. Chet Herren, Pawhuska, OK……………………………$5,215.24

13. Travis Mills, Gillette, WY……………………………$5,061.88

14. Will McBride, Ogallala, NE……………………………$4,909.49

15. J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, TX……………………………$4,807.38

16. Tony Reina, Wharton, TX……………………………$4,802.41

17. Brodie Poppino, Big Cabin, OK……………………….$4,737.43

18. Cody Lee, Gatesville, TX……………………………$4,576.33

19. Billy Good, Wynnewood, OK……………………………$4,477.24

20. Bill Benson, Laurel, MT……………………………$4,371.87

BULL RIDING

1. Parker Breding, Edgar, MT……………………………$29,296.80

2. Jesse Petri, Athens, TX……………………………$15,456.31

3. Jeff Askey, Athens, TX……………………………$14,473.16

4. Lon Danley, Tularosa, NM……………………………$14,359.25

5. Clayton Sellars, Friutlandpark, FL…………………….$12,180.01

6. Elijah Mora, Wiggins, CO……………………………$11,359.10

7. Tyler Bingham, Honeyville, UT…………………………$10,877.34

8. Dustin Boquet, Bourg, LA…………………………..$9,481.23

9. Cole Melancon, Liberty, TX……………………………$9,337.48

10. Jeff Bertus, Avon, SD……………………………$9,106.82

11. Dylan Hice Vick, Escalon, CA……………………………$8,561.01

12. Trevor Reiste, Linden, IA……………………………$7,915.43

13. Scottie Knapp, Edgewood, NM……………………………$7,702.57

14. Chase Dougherty, Canby, OR……………………………$7,579.67

15. Nic Lica, Garden City, MS……………………………$7,510.13

16. Brody Yeary, Morgan Mill, TX……………………………$7,270.36

17. Brett Custer, Elk City, OK……………………………$7,190.53

18. Corey Atwell, Moravian Falls, NC………………………..$7,149.17

19.Garrett Uptain, Craig, CO……………………………$7,083.36

20. Payton Fitzpatrick, Polson, MT…………………………$6,719.59

BARREL RACING

1. Ivy Conrado, Hudson, CO……………………………$20,671.86

2. Kristen Spratt, Huntsville, TX……………………….$11,715.43

3. Kylie Weast, Comanche, OK……………………………$11,520.66

4. Dona Rule, Minco, OK……………………………$9,749.57

5. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, SD……………………………$9,173.82

6. Jackie Ganter, Abilene, TX……………………………$9,115.61

7. Ericka Nelson, Century, FL……………………………$8,127.72

8. Nellie Miller, Cottonwood, CA……………………………$7,961.15

9. Brittany Pozzi Tonozzi, Victoria, TX……………………..$7,326.49

10. Tonia Forsberg, Fillmore, CA……………………………$7,214.78

11. Jimmie Smith, McDade, TX……………………………$7,145.12

12. Taci Bettis, Round Top, TX……………………………$6,865.32

13. Emily Miller, Weatherford, OK……………………………$6,775.36

14. Leia Pluemer, Las Lunas, NM……………………………$6,283.59

15. Jessica Routier, Buffalo, SD……………………………$6,254.89

Western Landowners Release Guide Aimed at Reducing Wildlife Conflict

Western Landowners Release Guide Aimed

at Reducing Wildlife Conflict

Landowner-led effort focuses on conservation and sharing a managed, wild,

working landscape that sustains both people and wildlife

Santa Fe, NM (January 16, 2019) – Western Landowners Alliance (WLA)—a member-based nonprofit organization focused on advancing policies and practices that sustain working lands, connected landscapes, and native species—has released a wildlife guide produced by and for landowners and practitioners constructively engaged in one of the greatest conservation challenges of our time—how to share and manage a wild, working landscape that sustains both people and wildlife.

Historically, the relationship between ranchers and large carnivores—native predators capable of killing and eating livestock—in the western United States may well have been predominantly adversarial. The reality now is that some of the most outspoken advocates for peaceful coexistence with wildlife are the ranchers and landowners whose land provides critical habitat.

While WLA's guide, "Reducing Conflict with Grizzly Bears, Wolves and Elk," centers on the more well-known and publicized struggles between man and animal in the Rockies, the important lessons and knowledge are universal throughout the West. The resources and best management practices in the guide have been developed and informed by dedicated landowners, wildlife agencies, researchers and nonprofit organizations. Each of the contributors in this guide brings a wealth of real-world experience in ranching and wildlife management and knows first-hand the difference between what looks good on paper and what works on the ground.

Because much of the land that once provided continuous wildlife habitat in the valleys and foothills of the Rockies has been developed into cities, towns and residences, the remaining lower elevation, intermixed private and publicly owned working lands provide important seasonal habitat and key migration corridors. Despite the conflicts with rural agriculture, large carnivores and ungulates are generally better suited to rural working lands than to urban or residential areas. The private and publicly owned working landscapes of the American West are the last best place—indeed perhaps the last chance—for these large species to exist in the lower 48 states.

"Every year we're adding more people and occupying more space in the West," said Lesli Allison, executive director of Western Landowners Alliance, "and as humans encroach on wild places, we must acknowledge the impact and base actions and policies around science and what has proven to work.In some cases, best practices and knowledge sharing is the missing link."

"This guide has been produced by and for landowners and practitioners constructively engaged in one of the greatest conservation challenges of our time and it will be successful if the knowledge and perspectives it contains help reduce conflict and prevent losses of livestock and wildlife. We also hope that it will open new ways of thinking and of relating to land, wildlife and one another," said Allison.

The ranchers' and farmers' practices and lessons-learned presented in the guide include the value of collaborative discussions, real listening and developing shared goals with other groups and individuals interested in the conservation of large carnivores and ungulates. It is intended to help owners and managers of private working landscapes mitigate conflict and coexist with large wildlife by:

1. Summarizing scientific understanding of key aspects of ungulate and carnivore ecology and behavior.

2. Summarizing conflict mitigation strategies, tactics and programs available to landowners.

3. Assessing their effectiveness through interviews and case studies.

Contributing landowners and others share their thoughts on the effectiveness of strategies and programs and discuss additional knowledge, policy and funding needs. The guide also describes and references a few of the programs available through state wildlife agencies and NGOs to provide assistance, incentivize coexistence and mitigate conflict.

The Western Landowners Alliance is indebted to National Geographic Society for making this project possible; the George B. Storer Foundation, Partners for Fish and Wildlife, the Blackfoot Challenge and Heart of the Rockies for providing critical support during the production phase; and to the wise guidance and unfailing support of Rick Danvir, a founding member, advisor and the principal author of this guide.

Annual Mitchell Soil Health Event set Feb. 14 at Highland Conference Center

BROOKINGS, S.D. – SDSU Extension will host the annual Mitchell Soil Health Event February 14, 2019 at the Highland Conference Center (2000 Highland Way) in Mitchell.

The event will focus on cover crops and their role in nutrient cycling, moisture management and soil biology and includes speakers and vendor booths.

The event begins and 9:30 a.m. and runs until 4 p.m. Certified Crop Advisor credits are available. The event is offered at no cost and includes lunch.

Topic highlights

Cover Crops as a Management Tool – Lee Briese, independent crop consultant from south central North Dakota, will address the challenges of soil degradation, pest management and economic profitability. Briese was named 2016 Consultant of the Year from the National Alliance of Independent Crop Consultants (NAICC) and was the 2017 International Certified Crop Adviser (ICCA) of the Year. He currently works with growers in North Dakota.

Regenerating Soils with Microbiology – Kris Nichols, founder and principal scientist of KRIS (Knowledge for Regeneration and Innovation in Soils) Systems. Nichols is a soil biologist by trade, and spent 11 years as a Research Soil Biologist at the USDA Research Station at Mandan, N.D. She will discuss addressing current and future agricultural needs by building upon a soil health foundation and identifying biological methods for agricultural production, tools and practices to help reduce pest issues, soil erosion, fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Cover Crop Nutrient Cycling in South Dakota – Anthony Bly, SDSU Extension Soils Field Specialist. Bly is the lead researcher on a large research project, based in South Dakota, that looks at the role cover crops play in nutrient cycling in soils. He will share some initial observations based on the first year of results.

Farmer Panel – Area producers will share their experiences with cover crops, no till and livestock integration.

Pre-register by February 8

To accommodate for lunch, organizers are asking that attendees pre-register by calling the Davison Conservation District office at 605-996-1564, ext. 3 or email heidi.rients@sd.usda.gov on or before 5 p.m. February 8.

More information and a full agenda for the soil health workshop can be viewed online at https://extension.sdstate.edu/events or at http://www.sdnotill.com.

–SDSU Extension

PLC Guide to Turnout on Federal Grazing Allotments During the Partial Government Shutdown

The partial government shutdown has left producers holding federal grazing permits with questions regarding spring turnout across the west. After speaking with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Forest Service, we have been assured permittees will have the ability to turn out on schedule this year – even if the shutdown persists into the spring.

Forest Service has provided written guidance for regional foresters during the shutdown. Current active grazing allotments are to continue operating. However, allotment inspections will be delayed until funding is restored and normal pre-season meetings with range staff will be put off until funding resumes. The agency is recommending that necessary staff are brought in to prepare, issue and monitor the payments 30 days in advance of the start of grazing. In the coming weeks the BLM is expected to provide similar guidance instructing livestock turnout as well.

Like any year, this access is contingent on payment of grazing fees. The 2019 annual grazing was set for release this January. However, the partial government shutdown will likely delay the Animal Unit Months (AUM) and Head Months (HM) calculations for the 18,000 grazing permits administered by the BLM and the nearly 6,500 permits administered by the Forest Service. Permittees should expect to pay the minimum fee of $1.35. Once the government is up and running, fee adjustments will be administered to account for differences in the 2019 fee.

I feel your frustration during this time. The shutdown leaves the federal lands ranching industry – and all of agriculture – with many uncertainties. However, we are confident in our government's ability to fall back on its most basic functions. As regulations and nonessential tasks of the BLM and Forest Service are set aside, we are left with a simple set of statutory obligations. Providing livestock access to grass on federal land is among the required obligations of these agencies. Producers should have peace of mind of their ability to operate in the coming months.

That being said, it is critical that we demonstrate our careful stewardship of these resources. If you do not typically perform comprehensive monitoring on grazing allotments, you should. It is important to record data this season. Take photographs, document conditions, and record everything. This will help protect your operations in the event that activist groups file litigation regarding this rightful execution of statutory obligation during the partial shutdown.

–Public Lands Council

Lee Pitts: How To Live A Long Time

As a child I was ALWAYS taught to respect my elders but now days it's getting harder and harder to find one. One of those I respected immensely was Chuck Irwin who just passed away at the age of 94. If his name sounds familiar it's probably because he was one of the best bit and spur makers in the country. Cowboys loved his silver works of art and horses even more so. Chuck was at a show three days before he died, still taking orders. That night he went out to eat, tripped over a curb and fell. He grimaced, cowboyed up, ate a steak and drank some whiskey before some friends convinced him to go to a hospital. Three days later Chuck checked out of this orbiting nut house and the world is a lesser place.

Someone I'm sure you've never heard about was the lovely Lavinia, a friend of a friend who my wife visited religiously two and three times a week for a couple years. I dropped by on holidays and birthdays and one of the two photographs I have in my room is of Lavinia as I fed her chocolate cake on her hundredth birthday.

My favorite old person was my wonderful grandfather who passed away at 94. I think of him every day. From these three wonderful people I learned a few things on how to live a long and meaningful life.

First, stay away from doctors, hospitals and pharmacies. I bet between them, Chuck, Lavinia and grandpa never spent twelve days in a hospital. I also learned that people are a lot like cows, when their teeth start to deteriorate so does their life. At the end, my grandpa's teeth didn't even sleep in the same room as he did. My friends also avoided lawyers, stayed out of divorce court and were each married only once until death did them part.

Not one of my friends was a vegetarian or took Ginko biloba. They were raised on meat and milk and ate their share of prunes. They ate slowly and in small amounts. My grandpa could take an hour to eat one enchilada and when I fed Lavinia two helpings of her centennial birthday cake I thought she'd make 101 before we were done. Nor did they let alcohol ruin their lives, although Grandpa did enjoy a thimbleful of blackberry wine occasionally, but I doubt that's what killed him.

My three friends got up early and I'd be surprised if they ever stayed up late enough to watch the Tonight show. They loved to work, didn't need a gym membership to stay fit and when their possessions were dispersed their wasn't one "Thigh Master", "Bun Burner" or Richard Simmons exercise tape. They lived in older, cluttered homes and didn't waste too much time doing housework.

They all loved animals. Chuck and Grandpa were especially fond of horses while Lavinia loved cats. (Her only fault, as far as I was concerned.) Lavinia loved to garden and was married to a farmer. Chuck was a farmer and a cowman and my grandpa was raised on a walnut ranch and kept busy weeding two ballparks he built for the kids in our community. That's another thing, all three were good citizens and highly respected in their SMALL communities. None had a long commute to work… they just opened the back door and there it was.

My friends weren't stuffy or full of themselves and were comfortable in their own skins. I never once heard any one of them say the "F" word. Not one had a Facebook page, Tweeted or lived their life on "social media". They didn't dread the future nor think the younger generation is going to Hell. All three were willing to share their immense knowledge and skills with younger folks. All you had to do was ask. Instead, youngsters wrote them off as silly old senior citizens.

Chuck never spent one day in a resthome while Grandpa and Lavinia had to spend a couple years in a warehouse where old folks are stored. They hated every minute. So if I were you, I wouldn't spend another minute worrying about things that will never happen. Instead just make sure that when the sun sets tonight you can look back and say it was a day well spent. That's what Grandpa, Chuck and Lavinia did.

Baxter Black: Cowboy’s Grace

Dear Lord,

Yer lookin' at a man who never learned to cook

unless you count pork & beans

And a flowery grace like you'd read in a book

is really beyond my means

But You can believe I'm a thankful man

though it might be undeserved

And I'll eat whatever comes out of the pan

no matter what's bein' served

I don't take it lightly if it's real good

cause I'd eat it anyway

See I know there's people, in all likelihood

that might not eat today

So count me in if yer needin' grace

and bless those who provide it

The farmers and ranchers, the bakers of bread

the loving hand that fried it

But most of all, Lord, we give thanks to You

cause we who work on the land

Know how much our harvest and bounty is due

to the gainful touch of Yer hand

So bless this food and the life we embrace

and please forgive us our pride

When others with tables a-plenty say grace

for what we've helped You provide.