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2010 National Angus Tour has record setting attendance

Bill Brewster
Photo by Bill BrewsterParticipants in the 2010 National Angus Tour and Conference inspect cattle at the Van Dyke Angus Ranch of Manhattan, MT, during the record-setting event which drew 600 producers from 33 states to Southwest Montana. The family runs 400 registered cows on two ranches in Gallatin County.

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With over 600 producers from 33 states and five foreign countries in attendance, the National Angus Tour and Conference in southwest Montana on Sept. 14-16 set a new event record.

Based in Bozeman at the GranTree Inn, the tour featured a broad gamut of activities that ranged from nationally-recognized speakers during the Sept. 15 session, to visits to seven ranches where attendees inspected examples Angus cattle from over 21 seedstock producers.

The tour was hosted by the South Montana Angus Association (SMAA) and the Montana Angus Association. It was coordinated by Halane Van Dyken of Toston, who operates Thousand Hills Angus with her husband, Rick, their children and other family members. SMAA members and tour-stop ranching families also helped stage the tour.

Along with the opportunity to showcase some of the leading Angus bloodlines being raised in Montana, the tour also gave producers the opportunity to enjoy Certified Angus Beef meals at picturesque ranch settings and to talk about industry trends and issues with like-minded breeders.

“We are in the heart of Angus country,” said Bill Davis of Sidney, MT, the current president of the American Angus Association (AAA), during opening remarks. “We register over 30,000 Angus and that is more than come from any other state.”

Bryce Schumann, chief executive officer for AAA, said the enthusiasm for the tour had been outstanding as evidenced by record attendance.

It shows the influence that Montana breeders have contributed to the breed and to the Association, he said. His comments came while wrapping up the speakers’ session.

Schumann said it was important to a create a vision about Angus operations and the industry with inspirational leadership from ordinary people doing great things.

He said the focus on improving Angus animals genetically has already paid huge dividends because 63 percent of cattle for harvest are Angus-influenced.

“If we are not filled with optimism, we just need to go home and sell our cattle,” he said. “If we can ever get this industry to retain heifers, it will add dollars to the pockets of producers in this room because Angus bulls breed heifers,” he noted.

With over 600 producers from 33 states and five foreign countries in attendance, the National Angus Tour and Conference in southwest Montana on Sept. 14-16 set a new event record.

Based in Bozeman at the GranTree Inn, the tour featured a broad gamut of activities that ranged from nationally-recognized speakers during the Sept. 15 session, to visits to seven ranches where attendees inspected examples Angus cattle from over 21 seedstock producers.

The tour was hosted by the South Montana Angus Association (SMAA) and the Montana Angus Association. It was coordinated by Halane Van Dyken of Toston, who operates Thousand Hills Angus with her husband, Rick, their children and other family members. SMAA members and tour-stop ranching families also helped stage the tour.

Along with the opportunity to showcase some of the leading Angus bloodlines being raised in Montana, the tour also gave producers the opportunity to enjoy Certified Angus Beef meals at picturesque ranch settings and to talk about industry trends and issues with like-minded breeders.

“We are in the heart of Angus country,” said Bill Davis of Sidney, MT, the current president of the American Angus Association (AAA), during opening remarks. “We register over 30,000 Angus and that is more than come from any other state.”

Bryce Schumann, chief executive officer for AAA, said the enthusiasm for the tour had been outstanding as evidenced by record attendance.

It shows the influence that Montana breeders have contributed to the breed and to the Association, he said. His comments came while wrapping up the speakers’ session.

Schumann said it was important to a create a vision about Angus operations and the industry with inspirational leadership from ordinary people doing great things.

He said the focus on improving Angus animals genetically has already paid huge dividends because 63 percent of cattle for harvest are Angus-influenced.

“If we are not filled with optimism, we just need to go home and sell our cattle,” he said. “If we can ever get this industry to retain heifers, it will add dollars to the pockets of producers in this room because Angus bulls breed heifers,” he noted.

With over 600 producers from 33 states and five foreign countries in attendance, the National Angus Tour and Conference in southwest Montana on Sept. 14-16 set a new event record.

Based in Bozeman at the GranTree Inn, the tour featured a broad gamut of activities that ranged from nationally-recognized speakers during the Sept. 15 session, to visits to seven ranches where attendees inspected examples Angus cattle from over 21 seedstock producers.

The tour was hosted by the South Montana Angus Association (SMAA) and the Montana Angus Association. It was coordinated by Halane Van Dyken of Toston, who operates Thousand Hills Angus with her husband, Rick, their children and other family members. SMAA members and tour-stop ranching families also helped stage the tour.

Along with the opportunity to showcase some of the leading Angus bloodlines being raised in Montana, the tour also gave producers the opportunity to enjoy Certified Angus Beef meals at picturesque ranch settings and to talk about industry trends and issues with like-minded breeders.

“We are in the heart of Angus country,” said Bill Davis of Sidney, MT, the current president of the American Angus Association (AAA), during opening remarks. “We register over 30,000 Angus and that is more than come from any other state.”

Bryce Schumann, chief executive officer for AAA, said the enthusiasm for the tour had been outstanding as evidenced by record attendance.

It shows the influence that Montana breeders have contributed to the breed and to the Association, he said. His comments came while wrapping up the speakers’ session.

Schumann said it was important to a create a vision about Angus operations and the industry with inspirational leadership from ordinary people doing great things.

He said the focus on improving Angus animals genetically has already paid huge dividends because 63 percent of cattle for harvest are Angus-influenced.

“If we are not filled with optimism, we just need to go home and sell our cattle,” he said. “If we can ever get this industry to retain heifers, it will add dollars to the pockets of producers in this room because Angus bulls breed heifers,” he noted.

With over 600 producers from 33 states and five foreign countries in attendance, the National Angus Tour and Conference in southwest Montana on Sept. 14-16 set a new event record.

Based in Bozeman at the GranTree Inn, the tour featured a broad gamut of activities that ranged from nationally-recognized speakers during the Sept. 15 session, to visits to seven ranches where attendees inspected examples Angus cattle from over 21 seedstock producers.

The tour was hosted by the South Montana Angus Association (SMAA) and the Montana Angus Association. It was coordinated by Halane Van Dyken of Toston, who operates Thousand Hills Angus with her husband, Rick, their children and other family members. SMAA members and tour-stop ranching families also helped stage the tour.

Along with the opportunity to showcase some of the leading Angus bloodlines being raised in Montana, the tour also gave producers the opportunity to enjoy Certified Angus Beef meals at picturesque ranch settings and to talk about industry trends and issues with like-minded breeders.

“We are in the heart of Angus country,” said Bill Davis of Sidney, MT, the current president of the American Angus Association (AAA), during opening remarks. “We register over 30,000 Angus and that is more than come from any other state.”

Bryce Schumann, chief executive officer for AAA, said the enthusiasm for the tour had been outstanding as evidenced by record attendance.

It shows the influence that Montana breeders have contributed to the breed and to the Association, he said. His comments came while wrapping up the speakers’ session.

Schumann said it was important to a create a vision about Angus operations and the industry with inspirational leadership from ordinary people doing great things.

He said the focus on improving Angus animals genetically has already paid huge dividends because 63 percent of cattle for harvest are Angus-influenced.

“If we are not filled with optimism, we just need to go home and sell our cattle,” he said. “If we can ever get this industry to retain heifers, it will add dollars to the pockets of producers in this room because Angus bulls breed heifers,” he noted.


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