2010 Sturgis Range & Livestock tour demonstrated water quality, range monitoring and conservation | TSLN.com
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2010 Sturgis Range & Livestock tour demonstrated water quality, range monitoring and conservation

Melissa Burke

In spite of wind, chilly temperatures and muddy conditions due to substantial rainfall received early that morning, nearly 60 people were in attendance at the Range and Livestock Tour held Sept. 15 at the Alkali Community Hall east of Sturgis, SD.

The tour bus left at 9 a.m. and traveled first to the home of Dale and Janice Lundgren. Dale, who is a supervisor with the Elk Creek Conservation District, began by describing their deep water well that was dug in 2006 and which is a mile and a half south of their house.

“This well is in the Lakota formation,” he stated. “We were going to go down to 3,000 feet, but the bit was getting dull so we stopped at 2,900 feet. The pump is set at about 350 feet, and the water temperature itself stays about 50 degrees.”

Lundgren said that having the well has kept him from needing to haul drinking water and water for his sheep. From the main well, 10 miles of underground water line branches off to the north, west and south. This water line is six feet deep, and where a stock tank is needed, a curbstop tee with a hydrant is used to tap into the line.

Two other ranchers also obtain water from this source. It is called the Lundgren-Poss system and is named for him and one of the other two ranchers, Ed Poss. The ranch manager for Poss is Nick Uherka, who was also present to talk about the system.

“A mother cow can be standing in a stock dam on a hot day, go to the tank to drink, and then return to stand in the dam,” he chuckled. He went on to say that they had recorded higher weaning weights in their calves since using the well water, but that it was probably due in part to a couple of years with good grass and adequate rainfall. He added that there was no longer any worry about bad water in the dams and dugouts.

In spite of wind, chilly temperatures and muddy conditions due to substantial rainfall received early that morning, nearly 60 people were in attendance at the Range and Livestock Tour held Sept. 15 at the Alkali Community Hall east of Sturgis, SD.

The tour bus left at 9 a.m. and traveled first to the home of Dale and Janice Lundgren. Dale, who is a supervisor with the Elk Creek Conservation District, began by describing their deep water well that was dug in 2006 and which is a mile and a half south of their house.

“This well is in the Lakota formation,” he stated. “We were going to go down to 3,000 feet, but the bit was getting dull so we stopped at 2,900 feet. The pump is set at about 350 feet, and the water temperature itself stays about 50 degrees.”

Lundgren said that having the well has kept him from needing to haul drinking water and water for his sheep. From the main well, 10 miles of underground water line branches off to the north, west and south. This water line is six feet deep, and where a stock tank is needed, a curbstop tee with a hydrant is used to tap into the line.

Two other ranchers also obtain water from this source. It is called the Lundgren-Poss system and is named for him and one of the other two ranchers, Ed Poss. The ranch manager for Poss is Nick Uherka, who was also present to talk about the system.

“A mother cow can be standing in a stock dam on a hot day, go to the tank to drink, and then return to stand in the dam,” he chuckled. He went on to say that they had recorded higher weaning weights in their calves since using the well water, but that it was probably due in part to a couple of years with good grass and adequate rainfall. He added that there was no longer any worry about bad water in the dams and dugouts.

In spite of wind, chilly temperatures and muddy conditions due to substantial rainfall received early that morning, nearly 60 people were in attendance at the Range and Livestock Tour held Sept. 15 at the Alkali Community Hall east of Sturgis, SD.

The tour bus left at 9 a.m. and traveled first to the home of Dale and Janice Lundgren. Dale, who is a supervisor with the Elk Creek Conservation District, began by describing their deep water well that was dug in 2006 and which is a mile and a half south of their house.

“This well is in the Lakota formation,” he stated. “We were going to go down to 3,000 feet, but the bit was getting dull so we stopped at 2,900 feet. The pump is set at about 350 feet, and the water temperature itself stays about 50 degrees.”

Lundgren said that having the well has kept him from needing to haul drinking water and water for his sheep. From the main well, 10 miles of underground water line branches off to the north, west and south. This water line is six feet deep, and where a stock tank is needed, a curbstop tee with a hydrant is used to tap into the line.

Two other ranchers also obtain water from this source. It is called the Lundgren-Poss system and is named for him and one of the other two ranchers, Ed Poss. The ranch manager for Poss is Nick Uherka, who was also present to talk about the system.

“A mother cow can be standing in a stock dam on a hot day, go to the tank to drink, and then return to stand in the dam,” he chuckled. He went on to say that they had recorded higher weaning weights in their calves since using the well water, but that it was probably due in part to a couple of years with good grass and adequate rainfall. He added that there was no longer any worry about bad water in the dams and dugouts.

In spite of wind, chilly temperatures and muddy conditions due to substantial rainfall received early that morning, nearly 60 people were in attendance at the Range and Livestock Tour held Sept. 15 at the Alkali Community Hall east of Sturgis, SD.

The tour bus left at 9 a.m. and traveled first to the home of Dale and Janice Lundgren. Dale, who is a supervisor with the Elk Creek Conservation District, began by describing their deep water well that was dug in 2006 and which is a mile and a half south of their house.

“This well is in the Lakota formation,” he stated. “We were going to go down to 3,000 feet, but the bit was getting dull so we stopped at 2,900 feet. The pump is set at about 350 feet, and the water temperature itself stays about 50 degrees.”

Lundgren said that having the well has kept him from needing to haul drinking water and water for his sheep. From the main well, 10 miles of underground water line branches off to the north, west and south. This water line is six feet deep, and where a stock tank is needed, a curbstop tee with a hydrant is used to tap into the line.

Two other ranchers also obtain water from this source. It is called the Lundgren-Poss system and is named for him and one of the other two ranchers, Ed Poss. The ranch manager for Poss is Nick Uherka, who was also present to talk about the system.

“A mother cow can be standing in a stock dam on a hot day, go to the tank to drink, and then return to stand in the dam,” he chuckled. He went on to say that they had recorded higher weaning weights in their calves since using the well water, but that it was probably due in part to a couple of years with good grass and adequate rainfall. He added that there was no longer any worry about bad water in the dams and dugouts.

In spite of wind, chilly temperatures and muddy conditions due to substantial rainfall received early that morning, nearly 60 people were in attendance at the Range and Livestock Tour held Sept. 15 at the Alkali Community Hall east of Sturgis, SD.

The tour bus left at 9 a.m. and traveled first to the home of Dale and Janice Lundgren. Dale, who is a supervisor with the Elk Creek Conservation District, began by describing their deep water well that was dug in 2006 and which is a mile and a half south of their house.

“This well is in the Lakota formation,” he stated. “We were going to go down to 3,000 feet, but the bit was getting dull so we stopped at 2,900 feet. The pump is set at about 350 feet, and the water temperature itself stays about 50 degrees.”

Lundgren said that having the well has kept him from needing to haul drinking water and water for his sheep. From the main well, 10 miles of underground water line branches off to the north, west and south. This water line is six feet deep, and where a stock tank is needed, a curbstop tee with a hydrant is used to tap into the line.

Two other ranchers also obtain water from this source. It is called the Lundgren-Poss system and is named for him and one of the other two ranchers, Ed Poss. The ranch manager for Poss is Nick Uherka, who was also present to talk about the system.

“A mother cow can be standing in a stock dam on a hot day, go to the tank to drink, and then return to stand in the dam,” he chuckled. He went on to say that they had recorded higher weaning weights in their calves since using the well water, but that it was probably due in part to a couple of years with good grass and adequate rainfall. He added that there was no longer any worry about bad water in the dams and dugouts.


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