A chance at the dream | TSLN.com

A chance at the dream

Amanda Nolz

From a young age, Brooks VanDyke knew he wanted to join his family’s cattle operation near Elkton, SD when he graduated high school. A small cow-calf operation, VanDyke knew he would need to expand the business to be a part of it, so he started thinking about his options in getting financing to help him reach his goals. VanDyke turned to the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA), where he quickly qualified for the monetary support he needed to get on his feet in the cattle business.

“My first loan with FSA was in 2001, a year after I finished high school,” said VanDyke, who used the money to buy 12 purebred Charolais females of his own. “A loan officer came out to the farm to talk about my ideas, take a look at the facilities and see what was possible. With FSA, no idea is a bad idea, and they gave me a chance to gain independence and pride in purchasing my own heifers for the first time.”

From a young age, Brooks VanDyke knew he wanted to join his family’s cattle operation near Elkton, SD when he graduated high school. A small cow-calf operation, VanDyke knew he would need to expand the business to be a part of it, so he started thinking about his options in getting financing to help him reach his goals. VanDyke turned to the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA), where he quickly qualified for the monetary support he needed to get on his feet in the cattle business.

“My first loan with FSA was in 2001, a year after I finished high school,” said VanDyke, who used the money to buy 12 purebred Charolais females of his own. “A loan officer came out to the farm to talk about my ideas, take a look at the facilities and see what was possible. With FSA, no idea is a bad idea, and they gave me a chance to gain independence and pride in purchasing my own heifers for the first time.”

From a young age, Brooks VanDyke knew he wanted to join his family’s cattle operation near Elkton, SD when he graduated high school. A small cow-calf operation, VanDyke knew he would need to expand the business to be a part of it, so he started thinking about his options in getting financing to help him reach his goals. VanDyke turned to the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA), where he quickly qualified for the monetary support he needed to get on his feet in the cattle business.

“My first loan with FSA was in 2001, a year after I finished high school,” said VanDyke, who used the money to buy 12 purebred Charolais females of his own. “A loan officer came out to the farm to talk about my ideas, take a look at the facilities and see what was possible. With FSA, no idea is a bad idea, and they gave me a chance to gain independence and pride in purchasing my own heifers for the first time.”

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From a young age, Brooks VanDyke knew he wanted to join his family’s cattle operation near Elkton, SD when he graduated high school. A small cow-calf operation, VanDyke knew he would need to expand the business to be a part of it, so he started thinking about his options in getting financing to help him reach his goals. VanDyke turned to the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA), where he quickly qualified for the monetary support he needed to get on his feet in the cattle business.

“My first loan with FSA was in 2001, a year after I finished high school,” said VanDyke, who used the money to buy 12 purebred Charolais females of his own. “A loan officer came out to the farm to talk about my ideas, take a look at the facilities and see what was possible. With FSA, no idea is a bad idea, and they gave me a chance to gain independence and pride in purchasing my own heifers for the first time.”