A change of heart | TSLN.com

A change of heart

Amanda Nolz

Part 3

This is the third segment of a four-part series on my journey back to my family’s cattle operation near Mitchell, SD. In case you missed it, I had survived the growing pains of high school, experienced agriculture in a whole new light as a beef ambassador, and last week’s edition sent me to college, where I was going to pursue a double major in political science and communication. I was confident that agriculture was not a potential career path, and I was certain my beef cattle days would be limited to old 4-H memories. Yet, like many college students, it took just one class to shatter those neat little plans to pieces…

“Is this class over yet?” I thought to myself as I sat in Political Ideologies 165. There were eight of us in the class, and I was bored out of my mind. The clock seemed frozen in time, and I didn’t know how I would survive a whole semester of these lectures. As my professor discussed the political theories and ideals of the German government, I felt like Charlie Brown when all he hears from his teacher is, “Waa, waa, waa, waaaa.”

Nevertheless, I was excited to be a political science major. I saw myself pursuing a career in politics or law. I pictured black stilettos and sharp looking suits. I envisioned a life of traveling the world and carving out a fast-paced career along the way. And, if that was my goal, I thought I was on the right track. I had just earned myself a summer internship at USDA Agricultural Marketing Service in Washington, DC, and I could hardly wait for the end of the school year. It was hard to believe that I was going to work in the most powerful city in the world at the tender age of 19.

So, as I sat in that class, suffering from severe boredom and disinterest, I started wondering about my passions. Did I really care about this topic? Was this what I really wanted? Despite my visions for the future, it suddenly dawned on me that what I wanted was sitting right in front of me the entire time. I wanted agriculture. I wanted it to be more than a hobby; I wanted to focus my entire career around it. I realized that my professors had no clue about my interests in agriculture and they certainly wouldn’t tailor their lessons for one little country girl. I decided that if I wanted to have a career that mattered, it needed to be in the agriculture sector. I just wasn’t sure how I was going to set this idea into action.

This is the third segment of a four-part series on my journey back to my family’s cattle operation near Mitchell, SD. In case you missed it, I had survived the growing pains of high school, experienced agriculture in a whole new light as a beef ambassador, and last week’s edition sent me to college, where I was going to pursue a double major in political science and communication. I was confident that agriculture was not a potential career path, and I was certain my beef cattle days would be limited to old 4-H memories. Yet, like many college students, it took just one class to shatter those neat little plans to pieces…

“Is this class over yet?” I thought to myself as I sat in Political Ideologies 165. There were eight of us in the class, and I was bored out of my mind. The clock seemed frozen in time, and I didn’t know how I would survive a whole semester of these lectures. As my professor discussed the political theories and ideals of the German government, I felt like Charlie Brown when all he hears from his teacher is, “Waa, waa, waa, waaaa.”

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Nevertheless, I was excited to be a political science major. I saw myself pursuing a career in politics or law. I pictured black stilettos and sharp looking suits. I envisioned a life of traveling the world and carving out a fast-paced career along the way. And, if that was my goal, I thought I was on the right track. I had just earned myself a summer internship at USDA Agricultural Marketing Service in Washington, DC, and I could hardly wait for the end of the school year. It was hard to believe that I was going to work in the most powerful city in the world at the tender age of 19.

So, as I sat in that class, suffering from severe boredom and disinterest, I started wondering about my passions. Did I really care about this topic? Was this what I really wanted? Despite my visions for the future, it suddenly dawned on me that what I wanted was sitting right in front of me the entire time. I wanted agriculture. I wanted it to be more than a hobby; I wanted to focus my entire career around it. I realized that my professors had no clue about my interests in agriculture and they certainly wouldn’t tailor their lessons for one little country girl. I decided that if I wanted to have a career that mattered, it needed to be in the agriculture sector. I just wasn’t sure how I was going to set this idea into action.