A man of integrity | TSLN.com

A man of integrity

In 1960, a fresh-faced kid applied for a job he didn’t really want at Black Hills Packing Company in Rapid City, SD. He had a brand new Animal Science degree from South Dakota State University and had just completed four years in the Army/ROTC, specializing in CBR (Chemical, Biological and Radiological) warfare.

He had attained many goals while growing up, in college and the military. What he really wanted to do upon completion of his formal education was to ranch. Sadly, the economics of attaining that goal, due to high land prices, high interest rates, and low cattle prices, stood in the way.

When the young man left the interview with the venerable Jim Howard of Black Hills Pack, he was afraid he had blown the whole interview with a brash statement he made. Mr. Howard had commented on the youngster’s experience in auctioneering and rodeo listed on his resume, stating that he didn’t want to spend two years training and mentoring someone just so they would quit and go chasing after some other career. The young man had responded that after two years, if Mr. Howard liked him and he liked Mr. Howard, he would be there until he had Mr. Howard’s job.

When called back in and offered the job, the surprised young man reluctantly accepted. Hence began the career of one of the finest cattle buyers to ever eyeball a set of cattle, and Darrell Hoar, after 48 years, is still buying cattle.

Darrell was born and raised on a ranch near Provo, SD. He was the middle child in a family of five, with two brothers and two sisters. On the ranch, which was five miles from the Nebraska border and 12 miles from Wyoming, they raised everything they needed and the ranch was totally self supporting. His dad John was a careful operator and though they never had much money they always had plenty to eat.

For entertainment and education they were heavily involved in 4-H. The whole family was involved, including his mom and dad. The county fair, Western Jr. Livestock Show, and Central States Fair were all opportunities to socialize, learn new methods, and compete in a myriad of contests. Darrell thrived on the competition and set goals with the determination to achieve them.

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He excelled at public speaking because he applied himself wholeheartedly in learning how to do it right. In any goal Darrell set, he used that same tactic to succeed. He would study what he needed to do, do the research necessary, practice the fundamentals until he had them right, and then give it his all.

That same work ethic allowed him to excel in his studies at college and also in the military. He credits his college education for providing the tools for the job he still has today. It taught him the fundamentals of learning his job, how to structure his business practices, and demonstrated that he would stick to the job until it was done. The military taught him to discipline himself and to pay attention to detail.

His dad, John, is the man that Darrell admires the most. Though his dad didn’t have much to say, when he did talk, it was worth listening to. His advice and example were very important to Darrell. His dad believed that if your word and integrity were no good, you were also worthless. Three things he believed should be guarded closely: your education, your health, and most importantly, your reputation. Your handshake is your bond and a binding contract.

Jim Howard was like a second father to Darrell. He hired him fresh and green out of college and Darrell many years later served as a pallbearer at his funeral. Mr. Howard believed that you should treat everyone equally with fairness and honesty. He also believed that a handshake was a binding contract.

In 1960, a fresh-faced kid applied for a job he didn’t really want at Black Hills Packing Company in Rapid City, SD. He had a brand new Animal Science degree from South Dakota State University and had just completed four years in the Army/ROTC, specializing in CBR (Chemical, Biological and Radiological) warfare.

He had attained many goals while growing up, in college and the military. What he really wanted to do upon completion of his formal education was to ranch. Sadly, the economics of attaining that goal, due to high land prices, high interest rates, and low cattle prices, stood in the way.

When the young man left the interview with the venerable Jim Howard of Black Hills Pack, he was afraid he had blown the whole interview with a brash statement he made. Mr. Howard had commented on the youngster’s experience in auctioneering and rodeo listed on his resume, stating that he didn’t want to spend two years training and mentoring someone just so they would quit and go chasing after some other career. The young man had responded that after two years, if Mr. Howard liked him and he liked Mr. Howard, he would be there until he had Mr. Howard’s job.

When called back in and offered the job, the surprised young man reluctantly accepted. Hence began the career of one of the finest cattle buyers to ever eyeball a set of cattle, and Darrell Hoar, after 48 years, is still buying cattle.

Darrell was born and raised on a ranch near Provo, SD. He was the middle child in a family of five, with two brothers and two sisters. On the ranch, which was five miles from the Nebraska border and 12 miles from Wyoming, they raised everything they needed and the ranch was totally self supporting. His dad John was a careful operator and though they never had much money they always had plenty to eat.

For entertainment and education they were heavily involved in 4-H. The whole family was involved, including his mom and dad. The county fair, Western Jr. Livestock Show, and Central States Fair were all opportunities to socialize, learn new methods, and compete in a myriad of contests. Darrell thrived on the competition and set goals with the determination to achieve them.

He excelled at public speaking because he applied himself wholeheartedly in learning how to do it right. In any goal Darrell set, he used that same tactic to succeed. He would study what he needed to do, do the research necessary, practice the fundamentals until he had them right, and then give it his all.

That same work ethic allowed him to excel in his studies at college and also in the military. He credits his college education for providing the tools for the job he still has today. It taught him the fundamentals of learning his job, how to structure his business practices, and demonstrated that he would stick to the job until it was done. The military taught him to discipline himself and to pay attention to detail.

His dad, John, is the man that Darrell admires the most. Though his dad didn’t have much to say, when he did talk, it was worth listening to. His advice and example were very important to Darrell. His dad believed that if your word and integrity were no good, you were also worthless. Three things he believed should be guarded closely: your education, your health, and most importantly, your reputation. Your handshake is your bond and a binding contract.

Jim Howard was like a second father to Darrell. He hired him fresh and green out of college and Darrell many years later served as a pallbearer at his funeral. Mr. Howard believed that you should treat everyone equally with fairness and honesty. He also believed that a handshake was a binding contract.

In 1960, a fresh-faced kid applied for a job he didn’t really want at Black Hills Packing Company in Rapid City, SD. He had a brand new Animal Science degree from South Dakota State University and had just completed four years in the Army/ROTC, specializing in CBR (Chemical, Biological and Radiological) warfare.

He had attained many goals while growing up, in college and the military. What he really wanted to do upon completion of his formal education was to ranch. Sadly, the economics of attaining that goal, due to high land prices, high interest rates, and low cattle prices, stood in the way.

When the young man left the interview with the venerable Jim Howard of Black Hills Pack, he was afraid he had blown the whole interview with a brash statement he made. Mr. Howard had commented on the youngster’s experience in auctioneering and rodeo listed on his resume, stating that he didn’t want to spend two years training and mentoring someone just so they would quit and go chasing after some other career. The young man had responded that after two years, if Mr. Howard liked him and he liked Mr. Howard, he would be there until he had Mr. Howard’s job.

When called back in and offered the job, the surprised young man reluctantly accepted. Hence began the career of one of the finest cattle buyers to ever eyeball a set of cattle, and Darrell Hoar, after 48 years, is still buying cattle.

Darrell was born and raised on a ranch near Provo, SD. He was the middle child in a family of five, with two brothers and two sisters. On the ranch, which was five miles from the Nebraska border and 12 miles from Wyoming, they raised everything they needed and the ranch was totally self supporting. His dad John was a careful operator and though they never had much money they always had plenty to eat.

For entertainment and education they were heavily involved in 4-H. The whole family was involved, including his mom and dad. The county fair, Western Jr. Livestock Show, and Central States Fair were all opportunities to socialize, learn new methods, and compete in a myriad of contests. Darrell thrived on the competition and set goals with the determination to achieve them.

He excelled at public speaking because he applied himself wholeheartedly in learning how to do it right. In any goal Darrell set, he used that same tactic to succeed. He would study what he needed to do, do the research necessary, practice the fundamentals until he had them right, and then give it his all.

That same work ethic allowed him to excel in his studies at college and also in the military. He credits his college education for providing the tools for the job he still has today. It taught him the fundamentals of learning his job, how to structure his business practices, and demonstrated that he would stick to the job until it was done. The military taught him to discipline himself and to pay attention to detail.

His dad, John, is the man that Darrell admires the most. Though his dad didn’t have much to say, when he did talk, it was worth listening to. His advice and example were very important to Darrell. His dad believed that if your word and integrity were no good, you were also worthless. Three things he believed should be guarded closely: your education, your health, and most importantly, your reputation. Your handshake is your bond and a binding contract.

Jim Howard was like a second father to Darrell. He hired him fresh and green out of college and Darrell many years later served as a pallbearer at his funeral. Mr. Howard believed that you should treat everyone equally with fairness and honesty. He also believed that a handshake was a binding contract.

In 1960, a fresh-faced kid applied for a job he didn’t really want at Black Hills Packing Company in Rapid City, SD. He had a brand new Animal Science degree from South Dakota State University and had just completed four years in the Army/ROTC, specializing in CBR (Chemical, Biological and Radiological) warfare.

He had attained many goals while growing up, in college and the military. What he really wanted to do upon completion of his formal education was to ranch. Sadly, the economics of attaining that goal, due to high land prices, high interest rates, and low cattle prices, stood in the way.

When the young man left the interview with the venerable Jim Howard of Black Hills Pack, he was afraid he had blown the whole interview with a brash statement he made. Mr. Howard had commented on the youngster’s experience in auctioneering and rodeo listed on his resume, stating that he didn’t want to spend two years training and mentoring someone just so they would quit and go chasing after some other career. The young man had responded that after two years, if Mr. Howard liked him and he liked Mr. Howard, he would be there until he had Mr. Howard’s job.

When called back in and offered the job, the surprised young man reluctantly accepted. Hence began the career of one of the finest cattle buyers to ever eyeball a set of cattle, and Darrell Hoar, after 48 years, is still buying cattle.

Darrell was born and raised on a ranch near Provo, SD. He was the middle child in a family of five, with two brothers and two sisters. On the ranch, which was five miles from the Nebraska border and 12 miles from Wyoming, they raised everything they needed and the ranch was totally self supporting. His dad John was a careful operator and though they never had much money they always had plenty to eat.

For entertainment and education they were heavily involved in 4-H. The whole family was involved, including his mom and dad. The county fair, Western Jr. Livestock Show, and Central States Fair were all opportunities to socialize, learn new methods, and compete in a myriad of contests. Darrell thrived on the competition and set goals with the determination to achieve them.

He excelled at public speaking because he applied himself wholeheartedly in learning how to do it right. In any goal Darrell set, he used that same tactic to succeed. He would study what he needed to do, do the research necessary, practice the fundamentals until he had them right, and then give it his all.

That same work ethic allowed him to excel in his studies at college and also in the military. He credits his college education for providing the tools for the job he still has today. It taught him the fundamentals of learning his job, how to structure his business practices, and demonstrated that he would stick to the job until it was done. The military taught him to discipline himself and to pay attention to detail.

His dad, John, is the man that Darrell admires the most. Though his dad didn’t have much to say, when he did talk, it was worth listening to. His advice and example were very important to Darrell. His dad believed that if your word and integrity were no good, you were also worthless. Three things he believed should be guarded closely: your education, your health, and most importantly, your reputation. Your handshake is your bond and a binding contract.

Jim Howard was like a second father to Darrell. He hired him fresh and green out of college and Darrell many years later served as a pallbearer at his funeral. Mr. Howard believed that you should treat everyone equally with fairness and honesty. He also believed that a handshake was a binding contract.

In 1960, a fresh-faced kid applied for a job he didn’t really want at Black Hills Packing Company in Rapid City, SD. He had a brand new Animal Science degree from South Dakota State University and had just completed four years in the Army/ROTC, specializing in CBR (Chemical, Biological and Radiological) warfare.

He had attained many goals while growing up, in college and the military. What he really wanted to do upon completion of his formal education was to ranch. Sadly, the economics of attaining that goal, due to high land prices, high interest rates, and low cattle prices, stood in the way.

When the young man left the interview with the venerable Jim Howard of Black Hills Pack, he was afraid he had blown the whole interview with a brash statement he made. Mr. Howard had commented on the youngster’s experience in auctioneering and rodeo listed on his resume, stating that he didn’t want to spend two years training and mentoring someone just so they would quit and go chasing after some other career. The young man had responded that after two years, if Mr. Howard liked him and he liked Mr. Howard, he would be there until he had Mr. Howard’s job.

When called back in and offered the job, the surprised young man reluctantly accepted. Hence began the career of one of the finest cattle buyers to ever eyeball a set of cattle, and Darrell Hoar, after 48 years, is still buying cattle.

Darrell was born and raised on a ranch near Provo, SD. He was the middle child in a family of five, with two brothers and two sisters. On the ranch, which was five miles from the Nebraska border and 12 miles from Wyoming, they raised everything they needed and the ranch was totally self supporting. His dad John was a careful operator and though they never had much money they always had plenty to eat.

For entertainment and education they were heavily involved in 4-H. The whole family was involved, including his mom and dad. The county fair, Western Jr. Livestock Show, and Central States Fair were all opportunities to socialize, learn new methods, and compete in a myriad of contests. Darrell thrived on the competition and set goals with the determination to achieve them.

He excelled at public speaking because he applied himself wholeheartedly in learning how to do it right. In any goal Darrell set, he used that same tactic to succeed. He would study what he needed to do, do the research necessary, practice the fundamentals until he had them right, and then give it his all.

That same work ethic allowed him to excel in his studies at college and also in the military. He credits his college education for providing the tools for the job he still has today. It taught him the fundamentals of learning his job, how to structure his business practices, and demonstrated that he would stick to the job until it was done. The military taught him to discipline himself and to pay attention to detail.

His dad, John, is the man that Darrell admires the most. Though his dad didn’t have much to say, when he did talk, it was worth listening to. His advice and example were very important to Darrell. His dad believed that if your word and integrity were no good, you were also worthless. Three things he believed should be guarded closely: your education, your health, and most importantly, your reputation. Your handshake is your bond and a binding contract.

Jim Howard was like a second father to Darrell. He hired him fresh and green out of college and Darrell many years later served as a pallbearer at his funeral. Mr. Howard believed that you should treat everyone equally with fairness and honesty. He also believed that a handshake was a binding contract.